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Colins, Olivier F.
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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Fanti, K. A., Kyranides, M. N., Georgiou, G., Petridou, M., Colins, O. F., Tuvblad, C. & Andershed, H. (2017). Callous-unemotional, impulsive-irresponsible, and grandiose-manipulative traits: Distinct associations with heart rate, skin conductance, and startle responses to violent and erotic scenes. Psychophysiology, 54(5), 663-672
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Callous-unemotional, impulsive-irresponsible, and grandiose-manipulative traits: Distinct associations with heart rate, skin conductance, and startle responses to violent and erotic scenes
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2017 (English)In: Psychophysiology, ISSN 0048-5772, E-ISSN 1469-8986, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 663-672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to examine whether callous-unemotional, grandiose-manipulative, and impulsive-irresponsible dimensions of psychopathy are differentially related to various affective and physiological measures, assessed at baseline and in response to violent and erotic movie scenes. Data were collected from young adults (N = 101) at differential risk for psychopathic traits. Findings from regression analyses revealed a unique predictive contribution of grandiose-manipulative traits in particular to higher ratings of positive valence for violent scenes. Callous-unemotional traits were uniquely associated with lower levels of sympathy toward victims and lower ratings of fear and sadness during violent scenes. All three psychopathy dimensions and the total psychopathy scale showed negative zero-order correlations with heart rate at baseline, but regression analyses revealed that only grandiose manipulation was uniquely predictive of lower baseline heart rate. Grandiose manipulation was also significantly associated with lower baseline skin conductance. Regarding autonomic activity, findings resulted in a unique negative association between grandiose manipulation and heart rate activity in response to violent scenes. In contrast, the impulsive-irresponsible dimension was positively related with heart rate activity to violent scenes. Finally, findings revealed that only callous-unemotional traits were negatively associated with startle potentiation in response to violent scenes. No associations during erotic scenes were identified. These findings point to unique associations between the three assessed dimensions of psychopathy with physiological measures, indicating that grandiose manipulation is associated with hypoarousal, impulsive irresponsibility with hyperarousal, and callous-unemotional traits with low emotional and fear responses to violent scenes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Callous-unemotional, Grandiose manipulation, Impulsive-irresponsible, Psychopathy, Heart rate, Skin conductance, Startle modulation
National Category
Psychology Neurology Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57669 (URN)10.1111/psyp.12837 (DOI)000399686900002 ()28169424 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85012253456 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Tuvblad, C., Fanti, K. A., Andershed, H., Colins, O. F. & Larsson, H. (2017). Psychopathic personality traits in 5 year old twins: the importance of genetic and shared environmental influences. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 26(4), 469-479
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic personality traits in 5 year old twins: the importance of genetic and shared environmental influences
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2017 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 469-479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is limited research on the genetic and environmental bases of psychopathic personality traits in children. In this study, psychopathic personality traits were assessed in a total of 1189 5-year-old boys and girls drawn from the Preschool Twin Study in Sweden. Psychopathic personality traits were assessed with the Child Problematic Traits Inventory, a teacher-report measure of psychopathic personality traits in children ranging from 3 to 12 years old. Univariate results showed that genetic influences accounted for 57, 25, and 74 % of the variance in the grandiose-deceitful, callous-unemotional, and impulsive-need for stimulation dimensions, while the shared environment accounted for 17, 48 and 9 % (n.s.) in grandiose-deceitful and callous-unemotional, impulsive-need for stimulation dimensions, respectively. No sex differences were found in the genetic and environmental variance components. The non-shared environment accounted for the remaining 26, 27 and 17 % of the variance, respectively. The three dimensions of psychopathic personality were moderately correlated (0.54-0.66) and these correlations were primarily mediated by genetic and shared environmental factors. In contrast to research conducted with adolescent and adult twins, we found that both genetic and shared environmental factors influenced psychopathic personality traits in early childhood. These findings indicate that etiological models of psychopathic personality traits would benefit by taking developmental stages and processes into consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg, Germany: Springer, 2017
Keywords
Psychopathic personality traits, heritability, teacher ratings, childhood
National Category
Psychology Psychiatry Pediatrics
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52725 (URN)10.1007/s00787-016-0899-1 (DOI)000398820500009 ()27683227 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988966620 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3831
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Corovic, J., Andershed, A.-K., Colins, O. F. & Andershed, H. (2017). Risk Factors and Adulthood Adjustment Outcomes for Different Pathways of Crime: Key Findings from the Swedish IDA Program.. In: A. Blokland & V. van der Geest (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook on Life-Course Criminology: (pp. 220-244). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Factors and Adulthood Adjustment Outcomes for Different Pathways of Crime: Key Findings from the Swedish IDA Program.
2017 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook on Life-Course Criminology / [ed] A. Blokland & V. van der Geest, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 220-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2017
Series
Routledge International Handbooks
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56971 (URN)978-1-138-81366-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-04-07 Created: 2017-04-07 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Klingzell, I., Fanti, K., Colins, O., Frogner, L., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2016). Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 47(2), 236-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions
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2016 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 236-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children with early onset of conduct problems (CP) are at risk for long lasting psychosocial problems, especially if CP co-occurs with callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Joint trajectories of CP and CU traits during early childhood were identified using data from the SOFIA study, following 2031 children longitudinally from ages 3-5 to 5-7 years. The results showed that children exhibiting stable high CP and CU traits were characterized by high levels of fearlessness, and psychopathic traits, including grandiose-deceitfulness, and impulsivity, need for stimulation. Children with decreasing or increasing CP and CU traits were characterized by decreases and increases respectively in their levels of fearlessness and psychopathic traits. Children high on CP and low on CU traits exhibited lower levels of these dimensions. Thus, stability and change of fearlessness and psychopathic traits are associated with stability and change in CP and CU traits, making these temperamental and personality traits promising target candidates for early intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Conduct problems; Callous-unemotional traits; Early childhood; Fearlessness; Psychopathic personality dimensions
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47883 (URN)10.1007/s10578-015-0560-0 (DOI)000371606700007 ()26115696 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Colins, O., Andershed, H., Hawes, S. W., Bijttebier, P. & Pardini, D. A. (2016). Psychometric Properties of the Original and Short Form of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits in Detained Female Adolescents. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 47(5), 679-690
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric Properties of the Original and Short Form of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits in Detained Female Adolescents
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2016 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 679-690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the psychometric properties of the self-report version of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits in 191 detained female adolescents (M = 15.76, SD = 1.02). Evidence supporting the validity of the ICU scores was generally weak, largely due to poor functioning of the Unemotional subscale. Results from confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated support for a recently proposed shortened version of the ICU consisting of two subscales (Callousness and Uncaring). Both subscales showed acceptable to good internal consistency. This short-form version also improved criterion validity, though some issues regarding its convergent validity need further consideration. In conclusion, this study suggests that a short-form version of the ICU that includes a subset of the original items may hold promise as an efficient and valid method for assessing CU traits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Springer, 2016
Keywords
Callous, Forensic, Female delinquents, Psychometric, Antisocial
National Category
Law and Society Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Research subject
Criminology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47895 (URN)10.1007/s10578-015-0601-8 (DOI)000382139900001 ()26493393 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84944908952 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Colins, O. & Andershed, H. (2016). The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short Version in a General Population Sample of Emerging Adults. Psychological Assessment, 28(5), 449-457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short Version in a General Population Sample of Emerging Adults
2016 (English)In: Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1040-3590, E-ISSN 1939-134X, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 449-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prior studies with children and adolescents have shown that Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short Version (YPI-S) scores are internally consistent and manifest expected relations with external variables of interest. In the present study, the factor structure and the internal consistency of YPI-S scores, and the convergent validity of the interpretation of YPI-S scores were tested in a sample of 2,500 emerging adults from the general population in Sweden (aged 20–24 years; 52.6% women). Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses support a 3-factor structure among both men and women that is similar to prior YPI-S studies conducted with children and adolescents. The YPI-S total score and the 3 factor scores were internally consistent. Correlations with external variables, including aggression and delinquency, support the convergent validity of the interpretation of YPI-S scores. Finally, the strength of these zero-order and partial correlations, overall, was not significantly different across gender. In conclusion, this study provides initial evidence that the YPI-S may hold promise as a brief and time-effective self-report tool for assessing psychopathic traits in emerging adults. The present findings also suggest that the YPI-S performs in a consistent manner across gender. Recommendations for future research with the YPI-S are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, USA: American Psychological Association (APA), 2016
Keywords
Gender, psychopathic traits, YPI-S, psychometric, self-report
National Category
Law and Society Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47893 (URN)10.1037/pas0000189 (DOI)000381698600006 ()26302107 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84939839021 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Fanti, K. A., Kyranides, M. N., Drislane, L. E., Colins, O. F. & Andershed, H. (2016). Validation of the Greek cypriot translation of the triarchic psychopathy measure. Journal of Personality Assessment, 98(2), 146-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Greek cypriot translation of the triarchic psychopathy measure
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Personality Assessment, ISSN 0022-3891, E-ISSN 1532-7752, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 146-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychopathy is conceived of as a pathological constellation of personality traits, manifested in aberrant behavioral, interpersonal, and emotional tendencies. This study examined within a Greek-speaking nonclinical sample (N = 419) associations between differing phenotypic dimensions of psychopathy (boldness, meanness, disinhibition) assessed via the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (TriPM) and self-report criterion measures of psychopathology, personality, and history of abuse and neglect. Consistent with predictions of the triarchic model of psychopathy, evidence was found for distinct correlates of the 3 phenotypic dimensions. Boldness was associated with both adaptive (immunity to anxiety/distress, fearlessness, low hostility) and maladaptive tendencies (grandiose manipulative traits, Machiavellian features including desire for control/status, and verbal aggression). Meanness was related to callous and unemotional traits, features of Machiavellianism (e.g., amoral manipulation and distrust of others), physical aggression, and absence of positive parenting. Disinhibition, by contrast, was characterized by anxiety and distress, exposure to violence, and retrospective accounts of abuse history, along with impulsive, irresponsible, and hostile tendencies. These findings indicate that the Greek-Cypriot translation of the TriPM effectively assesses the constructs of the triarchic model and extend what we know about their empirical correlates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48934 (URN)10.1080/00223891.2015.1077452 (DOI)000369856800004 ()26431272 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84956817763 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-07 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Van Damme, L., Colins, O. F., De Maeyer, J., Vermeiren, R. & Vanderplasschen, W. (2015). Girls' quality of life prior to detention in relation to psychiatric disorders, trauma exposure and socioeconomic status. Quality of Life Research, 24(6), 1419-1429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Girls' quality of life prior to detention in relation to psychiatric disorders, trauma exposure and socioeconomic status
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2015 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 1419-1429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Practice and research on detained girls has mainly been problem oriented, overlooking these minors' own perspective on and satisfaction with life. The aim of this study was to examine how girls evaluate multiple domains of quality of life (QoL) and how each domain is affected by psychiatric (co)morbidity, trauma, and socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods An abbreviated version of the World Health Organization (WHO) QoL Instrument was used to assess the girls' (N = 121; M age  = 16.28) QoL prior to detention. This self-report questionnaire consists of two benchmark items referring to their overall QoL and health, and 24 remaining items measuring their QoL regarding four domains (physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment). The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV was used to assess the past-year prevalence of psychiatric disorders and life-time trauma exposure.

Results: Detained girls perceived their QoL almost as good as the 12- to 20-year-olds from the WHO's international field trial on all but one domain (i.e., psychological health). They were most satisfied with their social relationships and least satisfied with their psychological health. Psychiatric disorders, trauma, and low SES were distinctively and negatively related to various domains of QoL. The girls' psychological health was most adversely affected by psychosocial and socioeconomic problems, while these variables had an almost negligible impact on their satisfaction with their social relationships.

Conclusions: The particularity of each domain of QoL supports a multidimensional conceptualization of QoL. Regarding treatment, psychological health appears as a domain of major concern, while social relationships might serve as a source of resilience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, 2015
Keywords
Females, psychiatric disorder, quality of life, socioeconomic status, trauma, WHOQOL-BREF, young offenders
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44144 (URN)10.1007/s11136-014-0878-2 (DOI)000355822000012 ()25429824 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84912569308 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Krabbendam, A. A., Colins, O. F., Doreleijers, T. A., van der Molen, E., Beekman, A. T. & Vermeiren, R. R. (2015). Personality disorders in previously detained adolescent females: a prospective study. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 85(1), 63-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality disorders in previously detained adolescent females: a prospective study
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, ISSN 0002-9432, E-ISSN 1939-0025, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This longitudinal study investigated the predictive value of trauma and mental health problems for the development of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) in previously detained women. The participants were 229 detained adolescent females who were assessed for traumatic experiences and mental health problems (mean age = 15.5 years). Three to 6 years later (M = 4.5; SD = 0.6), ASPD and BPD were diagnosed with a semistructured interview. Forty percent of the women had a personality disorder (i.e., ASPD 15.8%, BPD 9.2%, or both ASPD and BPD 15.2%). Posttraumatic stress, depressive symptoms, and dissociation during detention increased the risk for BPD in adulthood. Surprisingly, neither conduct problems nor substance dependence predicted ASPD; these findings require further study because they add to the controversy surrounding ASPD in females. The high prevalence rates of personality disorders indicate the need for intervention programs that target these unwanted outcomes.

Keywords
Abuse; Axis II; Cluster B personality disorders; Forensic; Gender; Precursors; Psychopathology
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Social Work; Psychiatry; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44145 (URN)10.1037/ort0000032 (DOI)000349075600008 ()25420142 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84925832812 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Colins, O., Andershed, H. & Pardini, D. A. (2015). Psychopathic traits as predictors of future criminality, intimate partner aggression, and substance use in young adult men. Law and human behavior, 39(6), 547-558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic traits as predictors of future criminality, intimate partner aggression, and substance use in young adult men
2015 (English)In: Law and human behavior, ISSN 0147-7307, E-ISSN 1573-661X, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 547-558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the prospective relation between Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) scores and various negative outcomes in a community sample of young men. Official criminal records and self-reported outcomes, including criminality, physical and relational aggression against intimate partners, and excessive substance use, were obtained on average 5.4 years (records) and 3.5 years (self-reports) after the YPI assessment. Results showed that psychopathic traits measured with the YPI (approximately at age 25) did not significantly contribute to the prediction of future official criminal charges and self-reported crime, physical aggression against intimate partners, and excessive alcohol and marijuana use, after controlling for several covariates. However, results also showed that men with higher scores on the YPI were more likely to commit future acts of relational aggression against their partner, even after controlling for prior relational aggression. This novel finding needs replication, though, and—for now—does not jeopardize the overall conclusion that psychopathic traits as measured with the YPI hardly predict over and above prior criminality and aggression. Altogether, the findings of the present study and their consistency with past research suggest that one should rethink the role of psychopathy measures for risk assessment purposes, at least when these measures do not index prior criminality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2015
Keywords
antisocial, men, prediction, prospective, psychopathy
National Category
Law and Society Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47894 (URN)10.1037/lhb0000148 (DOI)000369406600002 ()26301710 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute on Drug Abuse DA034608-01  DA411018

National Institute of Mental Health MH48890  MH50778

Pew Charitable Trusts, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention 96-MU-FX-0012

Pennsylvania Department of Health SAP 4100043365

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
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