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Fägerstad, A., Lundgren, J., Arnrup, K. & Carlsson, E. (2019). Barriers and facilitators for adolescent girls to take on adult responsibility for dental care: a qualitative study. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 14(1), Article ID 1678971.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers and facilitators for adolescent girls to take on adult responsibility for dental care: a qualitative study
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1678971Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study aims to explore and describe experiences of the dental care system among adolescent dental patients with a recent history of missed dental appointments at public dental clinics (PDCs) in a Swedish county.

Methods: Twelve adolescent girls participated in the study. Data were collected by individual, semi-structured, open-ended interviews and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

Results: The study findings could be summed into the theme ?Triggers for adolescent girls to take on or not take on adult responsibility for dental care?. The experience of free dental care could be summarized in five main categories: Pain and discomfort; Attractive and healthy teeth; Feeling safe and secure; Taking on the responsibility; and Free of charge. These five categories consisted of 15 subcategories.

Conclusions: The results of this study should increase the knowledge on how to meet and treat adolescent girls in dental care. Knowing what will happen during the dental visit was highlighted by the participants as decisive to whether or not they would attend their dental appointments. Therefore, we should as far as possible ensure that our patients feel safe at their dental visits and by trying to avoid painful treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Dental care, dental attendance, adolescent, content analysis
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77601 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1678971 (DOI)000490054100001 ()31608818 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85073161662 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Sweden  

Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden 

Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Wilde-Larsson, B., Carlsson, E. & Persenius, M. (2018). Older people's perceptions of the quality of oral care in short-term care units: A cross-sectional study. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 13(2), Article ID e12185.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older people's perceptions of the quality of oral care in short-term care units: A cross-sectional study
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e12185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is a lack of knowledge about oral care among older people living in short-term care (STC) units and how the quality of oral care provided by nursing staff is perceived by the older people.

Aim: To (i) describe person-related conditions among older people in STC, (ii) describe and compare perceptions of the quality of oral care (including perceptions of care received and the subjective importance of such care), within and between older people who have the ability to perform oral self-care and those who are dependent on help with oral care and (iii) examine the relationship between person-related conditions and the quality of oral care.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 391 older people in STC units in Sweden based on self-reported questionnaire and clinical assessments.

Results: The older people were assessed as having normal oral health (2%), moderate oral health problems (78%) or severe oral health problems (20%). When comparing older people's perceptions of quality of oral care in terms of perceived reality and subjective importance, significant differences appeared within and between groups. Psychological well-being had a significant relationship with perception of the quality of oral care (both perceived reality and subjective importance), and gender and oral health status had a significant relationship with subjective importance.

Conclusions: Older people's perceptions of areas for improvement regarding quality of oral care is a new and important knowledge for nursing staff in STC units. Older people want personalised information regarding oral health and oral care. Registered Nurses who take the responsibility in nursing care for older people's oral health may avoid unnecessary suffering by older people caused by oral health problems.

Implications for practice: Older people's perspective is an important component for quality work and might lead to improvements in the quality of oral care in STC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
nursing, older people, oral health, person-centred care, quality of care
National Category
Geriatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68063 (URN)10.1111/opn.12185 (DOI)000434118100008 ()29363883 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040973929 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

Funding Agencies:

Kamprad Family Foundation for Entrepreneurship, Research and Charity  NCT02825927 

Örebro County Region  NCT02825927 

Regional Research Board Uppsala-Örebro  NCT02825927 

Available from: 2018-07-25 Created: 2018-07-25 Last updated: 2018-07-25Bibliographically approved
Prenkert, M., Carlsson, E., Svantesson, M. & Anderzén-Carlsson, A. (2017). Healthcare-professional patients’ conceptions of being ill and hospitalised: a phenomenographic study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(11-12), 1725-1736
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare-professional patients’ conceptions of being ill and hospitalised: a phenomenographic study
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 11-12, p. 1725-1736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and Objectives: To describe the variation of conceptions of being ill and hospitalised, from the perspective of health-care-professional-patients.

Background: Previous literature focuses on either physicians' or nurses' experiences of being a patient, without aiming at determining a variation of ways of understanding that phenomena. Nor have we been able to identify any study reporting other health-care-professionals' experiences.

Design: This study has an inductive descriptive design.

Methods: Qualitative interviews with health care professionals (n=16), who had been hospitalised for at least two days. Phenomenographic data analysis was conducted.

Results: The feelings of security were based on knowledge, insight and trust, and acceptance of the health care system. Being exposed and totally dependent due to illness provoked feelings of vulnerability and insecurity. The patients used their knowledge to achieve participation in the care. The more severe they perceived their illness to be, the less they wanted to participate and the more they expressed a need for being allowed to surrender control. The patients' ideal picture of care was sometimes disrupted and based on their experience they criticised care and made suggestions that could contribute to general care improvements.

Conclusions: Health-care-professional patients' have various conceptions of being ill and hospitalised. Based on the general nature of the many needs expressed, we believe that the some insights provided in this study can be transferred so as to also be valid for lay patients. Possibly, an overhaul of routines for discharge planning and follow-up, and adopting a person-centred approach to care, can resolve some of the identified shortcomings. Finally, the results can be used for the purpose of developing knowledge for health-care professions and for educational purposes.

Relevance to clinical practice: The results can be used for the purpose of develop-ing knowledge for healthcare professions and for educational purposes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Health care professionals, patient safety, phenomenography, qualitative studies, quality of life
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52724 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13604 (DOI)000400992400028 ()27685871 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019022838 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-11 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2017-09-05Bibliographically approved
Svantesson, M., Carlsson, E., Prenkert, M. & Anderzen-Carlsson, A. (2016). 'Just so you know, the patient is staff': healthcare professionals' perceptions of caring for healthcare professional-patients. BMJ Open, 6(1), Article ID e008507.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Just so you know, the patient is staff': healthcare professionals' perceptions of caring for healthcare professional-patients
2016 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e008507Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore healthcare professionals' conceptions of the care of patients who are also healthcare professionals.

Design: Explorative, with a qualitative, phenomenographic approach.

Participants and setting: 16 healthcare personnel within different professions (doctors, nurses, assistant nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists) were interviewed about the care of 32 patients who were themselves members of different healthcare professions, in one healthcare organisation in Sweden.

Results: The care of patients who are healthcare professionals was conceived in five different ways, as: usual, dutiful, prioritised and secure, insecure and responsive. An initial conception was that their care was usual, just as for any other patient, and also a perceived duty to treat them and to protect their right to be a patient-as any other patient. Exploring further, informants described that these patients did receive secure and prioritised care, as the informants experienced making a greater commitment, especially doctors giving privileges to doctor-patients. A conception of insecure care infused the informants' descriptions. This comprised of them feeling intimidated in their professional role, feeling affected by colleagues' stressful behaviour and ambiguity whether the healthcare professional-patient could be regarded as a competent professional. The deepest way of understanding care seemed to be responsive care, such as acknowledging and respecting the patient's identity and responding to their wishes of how treatment was to be met.

Conclusions: Caring for healthcare professionals seems to trigger different ethical approaches, such as deontology and ethics of care. According to ethics of care, the findings may indeed suggest that these patients should be cared for just as any other patients would be, but only if this means that they are cared for as persons, that is, they are given 'person-centred care'. This would imply balancing between acknowledging the vulnerable patient in the colleague and acknowledging the identity of the colleague in the patient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group, 2016
National Category
General Practice
Research subject
Family Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48945 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008507 (DOI)000369993900023 ()26787244 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro County Region Research Committee OLL-393461  OLL-238541  6930 GBP

Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, E., Anderzén Carlsson, A., Prenkert, M. & Svantesson, M. (2016). Ways of understanding being a healthcare professional in the role of family member of a patient admitted to hospital: A phenomenographic study. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 53, 50-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ways of understanding being a healthcare professional in the role of family member of a patient admitted to hospital: A phenomenographic study
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 53, p. 50-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Healthcare professionals' experience of being family member of a patient can contribute to knowledge development and organizational learning in further ways than the experiences of general family members. However, there is little research on healthcare professionals' experience being on 'the other side of the bed'.

Objective: To describe how healthcare professionals understand the role of being a healthcare professional and a family member of a patient admitted to hospital.

Design: Qualitative with a phenomenographic approach.

Setting: Three Swedish hospitals.

Participants: All healthcare professionals in three hospitals were invited. Twenty-one volunteered for the study and 18 met the inclusion criteria; to have one year of professional experience and to have visited the family member in hospital daily during hospitalization. Family members in maternity or psychiatric care were excluded.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Transcripts were analyzed with a phenomenographic method to describe variation and commonality in the ways of understanding the phenomenon under study.

Results: Four dominant ways of understanding the phenomenon were identified; the informed bystander, the supervisor, the advocate and the carer. The four ways of understanding were hierarchically related with "The informed bystander" being least involved in the care of the family member and "The carer" more or less taking over the patient's care because of inappropriate, unsafe or omitted care. Common for all ways of understanding the phenomenon, except "The informed bystander", was the difficult balance between their loyalty toward the family member and their colleagues among the staff. "The informed bystander" and "The supervisor" are ways of understanding the phenomenon under study that, to our knowledge, has not been described before.

Conclusions: This study describes how being a family member of a patient can be understood in four different ways when the family member is a healthcare professional. The findings show similarities to previous studies on general family members as well as nurse-family members of patients in critical care. The need for professional communication, support and coordination will be substantially different if the family member understands his/her role as an informed bystander compared to if they perceive themselves as a carer. The role conflict and ambivalence toward building relationships described are aspects that need further exploration, as does the experience of being forced to care for a family member. Our findings contribute with new knowledge developing patient- and family-centered care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Family, patient care, phenomenography, qualitative methods
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47265 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2015.10.004 (DOI)000366873100006 ()26508538 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-31 Created: 2015-12-31 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Persenius, M., Hall-Lord, M.-L., Wilde-Larsson, B. & Carlsson, E. (2015). Clinical nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality indicators in Swedish stroke wards: a national survey. Journal of Nursing Management, 23(6), 705-715
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality indicators in Swedish stroke wards: a national survey
2015 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 705-715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To describe nursing leaders’ perceptions of nutrition quality in Swedish stroke wards.

Background A high risk of undernutrition places great demand on nutritional care in stroke wards. Evidence-based guidelines exist, but healthcare professionals have reported low interest in nutritional care. The Donabedian framework of structure, process and outcome is recommended to monitor and improve nutrition quality.

Method Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, a web-based questionnaire regarding nutritional care quality was delivered to eligible participants.

Result Most clinical nursing leaders reported structure indicators, e.g. access to dieticians. Among process indicator s, regular assessment of patients’ swallowing was most frequently reported in comprehensive stroke wards compared with other stroke wards. Use of outcomes to monitor nutrition quality was not routine. Wards using standard care plans showed significantly better results.

Conclusion Using the structure, process and outcome framework to examine nutrition quality, quality-improvement needs became visible. To provide high-quality nutrition, all three structure , process and outcome components must be addressed.

Implications for nursing management The use of care pathways, standard careplans, the Senior Alert registry, as well as systematic use of outcome measures could improve nutrition quality. To assist clinical nursing leaders in managing all aspects of quality, structure, process and outcome can be a valuable framework.

Keywords
Cross sectional study; Management; Nutritional organisation; Quality indicators; Senior Alert registry; Stroke patients
National Category
Nursing Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nursing Science; Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38719 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12199 (DOI)000360840300003 ()26340320 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84940925759 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Research Committee of Örebro County Council

Swedish Stroke Association

Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-18 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, S. & Carlsson, E. (2013). 'The situation and the uncertainty about the coming result scared me but interaction with the radiographers helped me through': a qualitative study on patients' experiences of magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(21-22), 3225-3234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'The situation and the uncertainty about the coming result scared me but interaction with the radiographers helped me through': a qualitative study on patients' experiences of magnetic resonance imaging examinations
2013 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 21-22, p. 3225-3234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectivesTo describe patients' expectations before and experiences during a head-first magnetic resonance imaging scan. BackgroundPrevious studies have reported that patients experience fear and anxiety leading to discomfort before, during and after magnetic resonance imaging scans. Frequent problems persist in producing high-quality images due to motion artefacts. These results imply a need for improvement of patient conditions to allow for the added benefit of better diagnostic quality. Provision of extended written information has not appeared to reduce patients' stress, while interaction with staff has been described as the most important factor for reducing such feelings. Design and methodsA qualitative, phenomenological approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and data were analysed with systematic text condensation. ResultsThe experiences of the ten participants were encapsulated by the main theme: The situation and the uncertainty about the coming result scared me but interaction with the radiographers helped me through'. Subthemes were Prescan preparation', Mastering threats to self-control' and Personal achievements by completing the scan'. ConclusionsOur study has provided a deeper understanding of the expectations before, and experiences during, a head-first magnetic resonance imaging scan. Valuable insight into patients' apprehension about written and verbal information was obtained. The patients reported how they coped with the unfamiliar and stressful magnetic resonance imaging scanning procedure. A trustful dialogue with the radiographer was described as being crucial for patients' ability to manage fear, discomfort and feelings of loss of self-control. We suggest a need for individualised information based on patient participation. Relevance to clinical practiceRadiographers, as well as nurses caring for patients who will undergo magnetic resonance imaging examinations, should recognise the difficulties inherent in written information. It is also of importance to adjust the patient-radiographer interaction to address patients' expressions of worries about the scanning procedure or the following result.

Keywords
magnetic resonance imaging, patient participation, qualitative research, radiographer
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Research w. Social Science Orientation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32359 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12416 (DOI)000325610300027 ()
Note

Funding agency: Orebro county council, Orebro, Sweden

Available from: 2013-11-18 Created: 2013-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, E., Ehnfors, M., Eldh, A. C. & Ehrenberg, A. (2012). Accuracy and continuity in discharge information for patients with eating difficulties after stroke. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 21(1-2), 21-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accuracy and continuity in discharge information for patients with eating difficulties after stroke
2012 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 1-2, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To describe the accuracy and continuity of discharge information for patients with eating difficulties after stroke.

Design: Prospective, descriptive.

Methods: The study investigated a sample of 15 triads, each including one patient with stroke along with his patient record and discharge summary and two nursing staff in the municipal care to whom the patient was discharged. Data were collected by observations of patients' eating, record audits and interviews with nurses. Data were analysed using content analysis and descriptive statistics.

Results: Accuracy of recorded information on patients' eating difficulties and informational continuity were poor, as was accuracy in the transferred information according to nursing staff's perceptions. All patients were at risk of undernutrition and in too poor a state to receive rehabilitation. Nevertheless, patients' eating difficulties were described in a vague and unspecific language in the patient records. Co-ordinated care planning and management continuity related to eating difficulties were largely lacking in the documentation. Despite their important role in caring for patients with eating difficulties, little information on eating difficulties seemed to reach licensed practical nurses in the municipalities.

Conclusions: Comprehensiveness in the documentation of eating difficulties and accuracy of transferred information were poor based on record audits and as perceived by the municipal nursing staff. Although all patients were at risk of undernutrition, had multiple eating difficulties and were in too poor a state for rehabilitation, explicit care plans for nutritional problems were lacking.

Relevance to clinical practice: Lack of accuracy and continuity in discharge information on eating difficulties may increase risk of undernutrition and related complications for patients in continuous stroke care. Therefore, the discharge process must be based on comprehensive and accurate documentation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
continuity of care, eating difficulties, information transfer, nursing, record audit, stroke
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-21638 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03648.x (DOI)000297953700004 ()21564355 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-83355166869 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Committee of Örebro County Council

Available from: 2012-02-14 Created: 2012-02-14 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, E., Ehnfors, M., Eldh, A. C. & Ehrenberg, A. (2012). Information transfer and continuity of care for stroke patients with eating difficulties from the perspectives of nursing staff in Swedish elderly care. In: Nursing informatics ... : proceedings of the ... International Congress on Nursing Informatics: . Paper presented at 11th International Congress of Nursing Informatics, Motreal, Canada, June 23-27, 2012. (pp. 61-64).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information transfer and continuity of care for stroke patients with eating difficulties from the perspectives of nursing staff in Swedish elderly care
2012 (English)In: Nursing informatics ... : proceedings of the ... International Congress on Nursing Informatics, 2012, p. 61-64Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Continuity of care is a key issue in the care for elderly people, for example, those having experienced stroke, particularly with regards to informational and managerial continuity based on patient record data. The study aim was to explore municipal nursing staff's (n=30) perceptions of discharge information provided to them for stroke patients with eating difficulties. Structured interviews were used and data were analysed by content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results showed that nursing staff perceived informational continuity and accuracy of information on patients' eating difficulties as poor and that little information on eating difficulties reached licensed practical nurses, who instead relied on their own assessments of patients' eating ability. Co-ordinated care planning and management continuity were largely lacking, increasing the risk for undernutrition and related complications for the patients.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41320 (URN)24199052 (PubMedID)
Conference
11th International Congress of Nursing Informatics, Motreal, Canada, June 23-27, 2012.
Available from: 2015-01-14 Created: 2015-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Eldh, A. C. & Carlsson, E. (2011). Seeking a balance between employment and the care of an ageing parent. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 25(2), 285-293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seeking a balance between employment and the care of an ageing parent
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 285-293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rationale: A growing number of middle-aged people are engaged in informal care of their parents while employed. To provide support as employers, co-workers or staff, health care professionals need insight into the experiences of people managing these responsibilities. Aim: To elucidate the experience of providing informal care to an ageing parent while managing the responsibilities of a working life. Methods: Narrative interviews were performed with 11 persons with experience of the phenomenon. Transcribed interviews were analysed with phenomenological hermeneutics. Ethics: Informed consent was given prior to the interviews. The study was approved by a research ethics committee. Findings: Providing informal care to an ageing parent while also pursuing a working life implies seeking balance: a balance between providing support to the parent's needs and one's responsibilities at work. Being employed supports this balance as it provides both fulfilment and refuge. Being capable of managing both roles grants a sense of satisfaction, supporting one's sense of balance in life. The balance can be supported by sharing the responsibility of caring for the ageing parent with others. Study limitations: Despite perceived saturation and an effort to provide for the possibility to consider internal consistency, the findings should be considered as a contribution to the understanding of the phenomenon, as experienced by individuals in their life world. Conclusions: It is essential to recognise the impact that providing care for an ageing parent may have on the lives of a growing number of people, particularly if they have employment responsibilities. Acknowledgement by others supports one's ability to attain balance; as co-workers and managers, we can acknowledge the efforts of an informal caregiver and as health care staff recognise the valuable contribution made by people in mid-life who provide informal care for their ageing parents.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-18703 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00824.x (DOI)000290589300011 ()
Available from: 2011-09-29 Created: 2011-09-29 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0714-0167

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