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Latina, Delia
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Latina, D. & Stattin, H. (2018). Adolescents Who Self-Harm: The Patterns in Their Interpersonal and Psychosocial Difficulties. Journal of research on adolescence, 28(4), 824-838
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents Who Self-Harm: The Patterns in Their Interpersonal and Psychosocial Difficulties
2018 (English)In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 824-838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We proposed that having mutually hostile interactions with others is a strong environmental stress factor that, together with diverse psychosocial problems, characterizes adolescents who self-harm. Using cluster analysis, this study examined the naturally occurring patterns of hostility conditions and psychosocial difficulties in a normative sample of 2,029 adolescents (50% boys; Mage  = 13.89). Results showed that self-harming behavior was significantly higher among the subgroup of adolescents with mutually hostile interactions who exhibited both internalizing and externalizing problems than among adolescents with other interpersonal-psychosocial configurations. Also, this subgroup of adolescents reported high impulsivity, anger dysregulation, and low self-esteem. These findings support recent research that indicates that adolescents who self-harm also tend to expose others to hostility and display externalizing symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63996 (URN)10.1111/jora.12368 (DOI)000450616500006 ()29266559 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038437614 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Latina, D. (2018). The severity and spread of adjustment problems of adolescents involved in mutually hostile interactions with others. Journal of Adolescence, 63, 51-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The severity and spread of adjustment problems of adolescents involved in mutually hostile interactions with others
2018 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 63, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the literature, bully-victims report a wider range of adjustment problems than “pure” bullies or victims. This may not be confined to the school context, but might be found in other settings as well. Involvement in mutually hostile interactions across everyday settings may more reflect adolescents' characteristic way of handling conflicts with others. We used data from a longitudinal study of a community sample of adolescents (N = 992). Cluster analyses for specific everyday settings and across settings yielded clusters high on both exposing others and being exposed to hostility. Adolescents in these clusters, and particularly across settings, reported a wider range of externalizing, internalizing, and academic problems, than adolescents in other cluster groups. Longitudinal analyses showed support for bidirectional relationships between mutually hostile conditions and problematic adjustment. We conclude that adolescents' mutual hostility experiences are associated with profoundly problematic adjustment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Adolescents, hostility, mutual hostility, adjustment problems, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, school adjustment
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63905 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.10.007 (DOI)000425483800006 ()29272767 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038881561 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-01-07 Created: 2018-01-07 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Latina, D. (2017). Att vara både förövare och offer för andras aggressivitet i ungdomsåldern. Best Practice (30), 16-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att vara både förövare och offer för andras aggressivitet i ungdomsåldern
2017 (Swedish)In: Best Practice, ISSN 1329-1874, no 30, p. 16-18Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Joanna Briggs Institute, 2017
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62766 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Latina, D. (2016). Self-harm: interpersonal and holistic perspectives. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro university
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-harm: interpersonal and holistic perspectives
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Who are the adolescents who purposely cut or burn their wrists, arms, or some other parts of their body? The fundamental question I raise in this dissertation is whether or not the portrait of self-harming adolescents as being exposed to others’ hostility in their everyday life environments and experiencing internal adjustment problems, particularly depressive symptoms, correctly represents their symptomology. I want to answer three questions: 1) What can be done to interrupt the maladaptive link that leads adolescents who experience internalizing symptoms to perform self-harming behaviors? 2) Are adolescent self-harmers typically exposed to others’ hostility or are they also involved in hostile interactions with other people? and, 3) What are the critical interpersonal and adjustment features of adolescent selfharmers? The results show that: 1) Adolescent girls with high depressive symptoms who feel at ease communicating with their parents do not use selfharm as a coping strategy when facing negative emotional experiences to the same extent as girls with high depressive symptoms who do not experience communication with parents as easy; 2) Adolescents who are involved in mutually hostile relationships with people who they meet in their daily life express more self-harming behaviors than adolescents who are exposed to others’ hostility; and, 3) Living in mutually hostile interactions with other people and experiencing both internalizing and externalizing problems seem to be key features of adolescents who harm themselves. Taken together, the results of this dissertation go beyond the traditional representation of selfharmers, and offer a holistic way of identifying a problem scenario under which adolescents self-harm. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro university, 2016. p. 69
Series
Örebro Studies in Psychology, ISSN 1651-1328 ; 35
Keywords
self-harming behaviors, relational problems, psychosocial maladjustment, ease of communication with parents, holistic perspective
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47312 (URN)978-91-7529-114-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-02-12, Långhuset, Hörsal 3, Örebro universitet, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-01-04 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Latina, D. & Stattin, H. (2016). Toward a Re-Interpretation of Self-Harm: A Cross-Contextual Approach. Aggressive Behavior, 42(6), 522-532
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a Re-Interpretation of Self-Harm: A Cross-Contextual Approach
2016 (English)In: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 522-532Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A common view is that self-harmers are individuals who are exposed to or have been exposed to stressors and hostility in everyday settings. A strand of research has also found that self-harmers expose other people to their hostility. Extending these findings, this study examined whether adolescent self-harmers are simultaneously exposed and expose others to hostility in their everyday interpersonal contexts—at home, at school, and during leisure-time. The participants were 1,482 adolescents, ranging from 13 to 16 years of age, who attended different schools in a medium-sized city in central Sweden. The results show that the adolescents involved in mutually hostile relationships in their different interpersonal contexts exhibited higher self-harm than the adolescents who were exposed to others’ hostility or exposed other people to their hostility. Also, the more mutually hostile settings the adolescents were involved in, the more self-harm they reported. Overall, our findings suggest not only that selfharmers are exposed to hostility in their different interpersonal contexts, as has been typically assumed, but also that they simultaneously expose others to hostility in these contexts. This has implications for our understanding of young people who harm themselves and also for intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
Self-harming behaviors, adolescents, mutual hostility, interpersonal contexts
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48561 (URN)10.1002/ab.21647 (DOI)000385940300002 ()26880108 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84991082898 (Scopus ID)
Projects
CDR
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Latina, D., Giannotta, F. & Rabaglietti, E. (2015). Do friends' co-rumination and communication with parents prevent depressed adolescents from self-harm?. Journal of applied developmental psychology, 41, 120-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do friends' co-rumination and communication with parents prevent depressed adolescents from self-harm?
2015 (English)In: Journal of applied developmental psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, E-ISSN 1873-7900, Vol. 41, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the role of both ease of communication with parents and co-rumination with one's best friend in the link between depressive symptoms and self-harm in a sample of Italian adolescents. Furthermore, it analyzes the possible differences between boys and girls in this link. Questionnaires were administered at a six-month interval at 711 adolescents attending three different schools (Mage=15.53). Moderation and multiple-group analyses were conducted using a path approach. Results showed both ease of communication with parents and co-rumination with one's best friend decreasing the likelihood of engaging in self-harm. Depressed adolescents were less likely to develop self-harm when they perceived communication with parents as easy. Multiple-group analysis verified this relation only for girls. The findings highlight the importance of interpersonal relationships in decreasing the likelihood of engaging in self-harm, and stress the role of a positive family setting in helping particularly depressed girls not to self-harm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Self-harm; Adolescence; Communication with parents; Co-rumination with best friend; Depressive symptoms
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46886 (URN)10.1016/j.appdev.2015.10.001 (DOI)000366078700013 ()2-s2.0-84947444812 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

L'Oreal Italy S.p.A.

Available from: 2015-11-30 Created: 2015-11-30 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Ortega, E., Giannotta, F., Latina, D. & Ciairano, S. (2012). Cultural adaptation of the strengthening families program 10-14 to Italian families. Child and Youth Care Forum, 41(2), 197-212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural adaptation of the strengthening families program 10-14 to Italian families
2012 (English)In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 197-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The family context has proven to be a useful target in which to apply prevention efforts aimed at child and adolescent health risk behaviors. There are currently a variety of cultural adaptation models that serve to guide the international adaptation of intervention programs.

The cultural adaptation process and program reception of the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 (SFP 10-14) was described in this article. The implementation context is one in which strong family bonds and high family communication are the norm.

We described our cultural adaptation process comparing our efforts to the recommended stages of the main current cultural adaptation models. We pilot tested and implemented the adapted version of our program with a total of 35 families in the city of Turin Italy.

This study showed that the SFP 10-14 may indeed be quite suitable for Italian families given the particularities of Italian society regarding strong family bonds and extended social networks. We described the language translation, cultural adaptation process for program materials, staff training, onsite supervision, and the process evaluation feedback that were undertaken as part of the adaptation efforts.

The field of prevention could greatly benefit from the identification of tools and techniques that are applicable to populations with diverse social and cultural backgrounds. The family is extremely important for Italians and represents a rich context in which prevention efforts could be addressed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2012
Keywords
Family, Italy, Risk behaviors, Prevention, Cultural adaptation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22551 (URN)10.1007/s10566-011-9170-6 (DOI)000301859800006 ()2-s2.0-84858620385 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-04-16 Created: 2012-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Latina, D. & Stattin, H.Adolescents who self-harm: A holistic perspective on their interpersonal and adjustment problems.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents who self-harm: A holistic perspective on their interpersonal and adjustment problems
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47739 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Latina, D. & Stattin, H. Toward a reinterpretation of self-harm: A cross-contextual approach.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a reinterpretation of self-harm: A cross-contextual approach
(English)Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47738 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
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