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Skovdahl, Kirsti
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Olsson, A., Engström, M., Åsenlöf, P., Skovdahl, K. & Lampic, C. (2015). Effects of tracking technology on daily life of persons with dementia: three experimental single-case studies. American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia, 30(1), 29-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of tracking technology on daily life of persons with dementia: three experimental single-case studies
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia, ISSN 1533-3175, E-ISSN 1938-2731, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate the effects of using tracking technology on independent outdoor activities and psychological well-being in 3 persons with dementia (PwDs) and their spouses.

Methods: Three experimental single-case studies with an A1B1A2B2 design. The intervention entailed access to a passive positioning alarm and technical support. Continual daily measures of independent outdoor activities among PwDs' and spouses' worries about these activities were made during all phases.

Results: Access to a tracking technology consistently increased the independent outdoor activities of 2 PwDs. One of the spouses consistently reported decreased worry during B phases, another's worry decreased only in B2, and the third showed little variability in worrying across all phases.

Conclusion: Tracking technology may support PwDs to engage in independent outdoor activities and decrease spouses' worries; however, randomized controlled group studies are needed to investigate whether these results can be replicated on a group level.

Keywords
Alzheimer’s, dementia, experimental single-case study, information and communication technology, outdoors, tracking technology
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Research subject
Nursing Science; Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36262 (URN)10.1177/1533317514531441 (DOI)000349294400004 ()24771764 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84922645603 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

University of Gävle

Örebro University

Dementia Association-The National Association for the Rights of the Demented

Knowledge Foundation

Available from: 2014-09-02 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Liedström, E., Kihlgren, A., Skovdahl, K. & Windahl, J. [. (2014). Being a Next of Kin: experiences of Burden and Quality of Life. Open Journal of Nursing, 4(4), 275-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a Next of Kin: experiences of Burden and Quality of Life
2014 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 275-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim and Objectives: To increase the understanding of next of kin’s life situation in the context of supporting persons who are long term ill, disabled and/or older by describing their experienced burden and quality of life and also the relationship between QoL, burden and socioeconomic variables.

Methods: Cross-sectional, descriptive and correlative design. Eighty-four next of kin answered two questionnaires: the Caregiver Burden Scale and the Subjective Quality of Life.

Results: Next of kin experienced a high burden in their life situation although they, at the same time, experienced a good quality of life. In the results gender differences were found. Females next of kin to a higher extent were disappointed, more emotionally involved, and they also estimated their economic situation as more unsatisfactory than the males next of kin.

Conclusion: Healthcare personnel meet next of kin, persons in need of care, within all healthcare and social care in society.Therefore it is important to have a general knowledge and ability to understand the next of kin’s life situation, thus making it possible to focus the nursing interventions on individual support regardless of the care receiver’s diagnosis.

Keywords
next of kin, informal caregiver, quality of life, burden, life situation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34658 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2014.44032 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-04-09 Created: 2014-04-09 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Dahlkvist, E., Nilsson, A., Skovdahl, K. & Engström, M. (2014). Is there a caring perspective in garden/patio design in elderly care?: a description and a comparison of residents' and staff members' perceptions of these outdoor spaces. Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 28(1), 85-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there a caring perspective in garden/patio design in elderly care?: a description and a comparison of residents' and staff members' perceptions of these outdoor spaces
2014 (English)In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 85-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article aims to describe the characteristics of and design elements in gardens/patios at 87 residential living homes for older people and to describe and compare residents’ and staff members’ perceptions of outdoor spaces. The aim was also to investigate factors related to residents' satisfaction with and stays in the garden/patio. The result showed that many gardens/patios had several recommended design elements and, at the same time, obvious deficiencies. The residents (n = 415) valued various aspects of the garden/patio more highly than did the staff (n = 667). Managers responsible for residential living homes for elderly people should take measures to ameliorate deficiencies and deficient elements in design and accessibility that are lacking so that the garden/patio can be used as an important health promotion resource in the care of elderly people. Residents and staff are important actors in such development work.

Keywords
design elements, garden/patio, residential living homes for older people
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36267 (URN)10.1080/02763893.2013.858094 (DOI)2-s2.0-84897731588 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 1 September 2014

Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Liedström, E., Skovdahl, K., Isaksson, A.-K., Windahl, J. [. & Kihlgren, A. (2014). Understanding the next of kin’s experience of their life situation in informal care giving of older persons. Clinical Nursing Studies, 2(1), 53-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the next of kin’s experience of their life situation in informal care giving of older persons
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2014 (Swedish)In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The experience of their life situation of next of kin in informal caregiving needs to be followed as they may need support to maintain their own health and cope with continuing in their caregiving role. Many of these individuals, often the older person’s spouse, are elderly themselves. The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of the next of kin’s experience of their life situation in connection with their informal caregiving of older persons. The study had a qualitative approach, with an inductive explorative design. Informal conversational interviews were conducted. Twelve next of kin were interviewed, nine of them twice. In all, 21 interviews were performed, and subsequently subjected to latent content analysis. The theme that emerged from the data was “A balance or imbalance in next of kin’s daily life.” The three subthemes were: (1) Balance and imbalance in the relationship with the older person, other family members, and friends; (2) Balance and imbalance in the relationship with the staff from municipal care; and (3) Balance and imbalance in demands, affecting the caregiver’s own health. Communication with mutual respect was described as a tool for creating good relations. The results of this study highlight the strained life experiences of next of kin while caring for older persons. There is a need to give more attention to the next of kin’s life situation and to find the means to support them. To reduce worry and stress, health care staff need to understand the next of kin’s experience of their life situation, and good relations need to be created among all involved in the care.

Keywords
next of kin, informal caregiver, life situation, older person, municipal care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34191 (URN)10.5430/cns.v2n1p53 (DOI)
Projects
Doktorandprojekt
Available from: 2014-03-11 Created: 2014-03-11 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Olsson, A., Engström, M., Lampic, C. & Skovdahl, K. (2013). A passive positioning alarm used by persons with dementia and their spouses: a qualitative intervention study. BMC Geriatrics, 13(11), 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A passive positioning alarm used by persons with dementia and their spouses: a qualitative intervention study
2013 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Increasingly, information and communication technology is being used to support persons with dementia living at home and their relatives. The aim of the present intervention study was to describe and explore the use and experiences of using a passive positioning alarm, over time, in daily life among persons with dementia and their spouses.

Methods

Using an ethnographically inspired approach, five couples, each including a person with Alzheimer's disease and his/her spouse living in their own home, were repeatedly observed and interviewed regarding their experiences of using a passive positioning alarm. Interview text transcripts and field notes were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results

The main findings show changes over time, where testing and checking the passive positioning alarm successively led to trust in the alarm and in one own's ability to use it. These components were a prerequisite for the couples to perceive the value of the alarm.

Conclusions

A passive positioning alarm for persons with dementia and their spouses needs to be packaged as a "service" with flexibility for each user and based on user needs, abilities, knowledge and skills. Using a passive positioning alarm can be a valuable support that allows persons with dementia to be alone outdoors and can increase safety and security for them and their spouses. The present study contributes to our understanding of what prerequisites need to be in place and what barriers need to be dealt with before successful implementation can occur.

Keywords
Alzheimer's disease, Information and communication technology (ICT), Interview, Participant observation, Passive positioning alarm, Spouse, Tracking
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29004 (URN)10.1186/1471-2318-13-11 (DOI)000317416300001 ()
Available from: 2013-05-14 Created: 2013-05-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pajalic, Z., Skovdahl, K., Westergren, A. & Persson, L. (2013). How the professionals can identify needs for improvement and improve Food Distribution service for the home-living elderly people in Sweden: an action research project. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 3(8), 29-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How the professionals can identify needs for improvement and improve Food Distribution service for the home-living elderly people in Sweden: an action research project
2013 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Making changes to municipal social care and service has been found to be challenging to realise and highly multifaceted. The aim of this study was to describe how the professionals can identify needs for improvement and improve Food Distribution (FD) service for the home-living elderly people in Sweden.

Methods: This study is part of a larger project with an action research approach focusing on to municipal FD to older people living in their own home in Sweden. The professionals involved in FD invited the first author to assist them in this process. The study participants were comprised of the following groups: “The Identification focus group” that identified need for improvement of FD (n= 5); “The Action focus group” that planned and choose suitable ‘action’ for improvement (n=5); “The First Evaluation group” (n=4) that evaluated the content of planned improvement and finally “The Second Evaluation group” (n=29) that evaluated the changes following improvement. The data was gathered and analysed by Story Dialogue Method.

Results: The need to update and increase the FD recipient’s knowledge in nutrition by sending them informative letters was found to be an important area to focus on. The information letters (n=1700) were distributed to the all FD recipients in six municipalities in southern Sweden during April 2011. The results were evaluated during May 2011. The overall general estimation was that the content of the letters indicated that this was a suitable method for gaining information to make a nutrition competence update. Following this, “The Action focus group” decided: firstly, to continue preparing and distributing information letters to all FD recipients to be sent out twice a year, and secondly: to make the information letters accessible on the websites of the six municipalities and county councils involved.

Conclusions: This study showed that systematic work inspired by an action research approach with motivated and involved participants can be beneficial and a starting point for the process of change in municipal service and care practice. The major conclusion of the study was that systematic reflection over everyday practice can be the vehicle for the future change of practice. The research process and the findings have implications for nursing, care of the elderly and gerontology.

Keywords
Action research, Evaluation, Improvement, Food distribution, Story dialogue method
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Nursing
Research subject
Nutrition; Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29028 (URN)10.5430/jnep.v3n8p29 (DOI)
Note

Zada Pajalic is also affiliated to The School of Health and Society, The PROCARE Group & The Network for Eating and Nutrition, Kristianstad University,Sweden

Available from: 2013-05-15 Created: 2013-05-15 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Olsson, A., Lampic, C., Skovdahl, K. & Engström, M. (2013). Persons with early-stage dementia reflect on being outdoors: a repeated interview study. Aging & Mental Health, 17(7), 793-800
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persons with early-stage dementia reflect on being outdoors: a repeated interview study
2013 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 793-800Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe how persons with early-stage dementia reflect on being outdoors. Method: Data were collected through repeated interviews with a purposive sample of 11 persons with early-stage dementia in Sweden during the period 2009-2010 and were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Informants described being outdoors as a confirmation of the self. Confirmation of their ability to maintain desired activities, despite the dementia disease, was important to the informants. However, some confirmations were not positive; the realisation that one could no longer perform certain activities could be devastating. Two sub-themes emerged: shifting between still being part of it all' and a sense of grief and loss and striving to keep on despite perceived barriers. Past, but no longer possible, outdoor activities were greatly missed and the informants longed to be able to perform these activities once again. To resolve possible difficulties associated with being outdoors, the informants used various adaptation strategies. Despite the described barriers, being outdoors was of great value to them. Conclusion: Independent outdoor activities seem to contribute to the well-being and feelings of self-worth among persons with early-stage dementia who want to be and are able to be outdoors. If a person with dementia, despite cognitive limitations, wants and is able to engage in outdoor activities, it is important for relatives and health-care staff to encourage and facilitate this, for example, by discussing adaptation strategies to deal with orientation problems.

Keywords
activities, early-stage dementia, nursing, outdoors, social construction theory
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-30783 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2013.801065 (DOI)000323476600003 ()23701394 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-13 Created: 2013-09-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Alnes, R. E., Kirkevold, M. & Skovdahl, K. (2013). The influence of the learning climate on learning outcomes from Marte Meo counselling in dementia care. Journal of Nursing Management, 21(1), 130-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of the learning climate on learning outcomes from Marte Meo counselling in dementia care
2013 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 130-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:   To identify factors that affected the learning outcomes from Marte Meo counselling (MMC).

BACKGROUND:   Although MMC has shown promising results regarding learning outcomes for staff working in dementia-specific care units, the outcomes differ.

METHOD:   Twelve individual interviews and four focus group interviews with staff who had participated in MMC were analysed through a qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS:   The learning climate has considerable significance for the experienced benefit of MMC and indicate that this learning climate depends on three conditions: establishing a common understanding of the content and form of MMC, ensuring staff's willingness to participate and the opportunity to do so, and securing an arena in the unit for discussion and interactions.

CONCLUSION:   Learning outcomes from MMC in dementia-specific care units appear to depend on the learning climate in the unit. Implication for nursing management  The learning climate needs attention from the nursing management when establishing Marte Meo intervention in nursing homes. The learning climate can be facilitated through building common understandings in the units regarding why and how this intervention should take place, and by ensuring clarity in the relationship between the intervention and the organization's objectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
counselling, dementia, learning climate, Marte Meo, nursing homes
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36264 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2834.2012.01436.x (DOI)000313989600014 ()23339503 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84872685445 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Aalesund University College 

Norwegian Public Health Association (NOPHA)

Norwegian Dementia Association 

Available from: 2014-09-02 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved
Pajalic, Z., Persson, L., Westergren, A. & Skovdahl, K. (2012). Evaluation for change, the decision maker’s involvement in the development of food distribution to home living elderly people. In: : . Paper presented at International Conference Interprofessional Partnership, Improvement for Global Health Outcomes, Thailand.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation for change, the decision maker’s involvement in the development of food distribution to home living elderly people
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
Action research, decision-makers, food distribution in Swedish context, “top-down” perspective
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Work
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-26234 (URN)
Conference
International Conference Interprofessional Partnership, Improvement for Global Health Outcomes, Thailand
Available from: 2012-10-17 Created: 2012-10-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Pajalic, Z., Persson, L., Skovdahl, K. & Westergren, A. (2012). Facilitating change, the decision-maker’s views of municipality organized food distribution to elderly people living at home and suggestions for development: a participatory action research study. Public Administration Research, 1(1), 14-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating change, the decision-maker’s views of municipality organized food distribution to elderly people living at home and suggestions for development: a participatory action research study
2012 (English)In: Public Administration Research, ISSN 1927-517X, E-ISSN 1927-5188, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study is the final part of a larger project with an action research approach focusing on food distribution (FD) within municipal service and care for elderly persons, living at home  (≥ 65 years), from various perspectives. The aim was to describe the decision-makers’ the politicians and top level administrative manager’s views on the FD service, and to give feedback from the results of earlier studies based on information given by FD receivers, the perspectives of involved professionals, and the results of an intervention study and further to report the decision-makers suggestions for which areas should be taken into consideration as starting points to improve the FD process and practice. Data was gathered in two steps: step 1, through individual interviews (n=12) with the decision-makers during the spring of 2009, step 2a through feedback from previous studies, received during the autumn of 2011 and step 2b from discussions based on the feedback. The interview data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicated a discrepancy between the reality and the political visions. It was shown that decision-maker’s needed to make decisions despite their uncertain knowledge of the complexity of the FD programme. They considered what has been, what is, and will be, when setting goals. Their goal was that elderly person’s rights and needs should be fulfilled. This included freedom of choice and individual consideration. In addition, it meant, meeting elderly people’s medical and social needs. Three areas were found to require facilitation for change related to FD: 1) the monitoring of the elderly’s health and wellbeing while providing FD, 2) the increasing of professional competence, and 3) the creation of a forum for inter-professional communication. The findings in this study have implications for nursing, gerontology and public administration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Toronto, Canada: Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2012
Keywords
Action research, decision-makers, facilitation, food distribution, municipality
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-26276 (URN)10.5539/par.v1n1p14 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-19 Created: 2012-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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