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Kihlgren, Mona
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Kihlgren, M. & Skovdahl, K. (2008). Vårdinsatser vid BPSD: förhållningssätt och behandling. Information från Läkemedelsverket, 19(5), 28-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vårdinsatser vid BPSD: förhållningssätt och behandling
2008 (Swedish)In: Information från Läkemedelsverket, ISSN 1101-7104, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 28-33Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Läkemedelsverket, 2008
National Category
Nursing Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6945 (URN)
Available from: 2009-05-27 Created: 2009-05-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Häggström, E., Kihlgren, A., Kihlgren, M. & Sörlie, V. (2007). Relatives' struggle for an improved and more just care for older people in community care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(9), 1749-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relatives' struggle for an improved and more just care for older people in community care
2007 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1749-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to describe the relatives' experience concerning older family members living in special housing facilities.

BACKGROUND: During the 21st century, the relatives of older people and their efforts related to the care and nursing of older people have been observed. The interest in these relatives is because of factors such as demographic changes, where the number of older people has increased and the increasing gap between the resources that are available for geriatric care and the care needed for older people.

DESIGN: The present study has a descriptive design and is part of a project including 24 specific residences, called special housing facilities.

METHOD: The study focused on the narratives supplied by the relatives that were analysed using qualitative latent content analysis, an interpretative process where the researcher considers the content of the text.

RESULTS: The relatives' experience of having an older person in a special housing facility that emerged from the study, was expressed in one main theme: The relatives' struggle for an improved and just care for older people and four sub-themes: (i)'To trust in caregivers'; (ii) 'To be confirmed'; (iii) 'To trust in care'; (iv) 'To receive the kind of care that one considers one has the right to receive'.

CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that the relatives need more support and more opportunities, so that they can participate in the care. The study shows the relatives engagement in working for a just society's obligation towards the protection of older peoples rights and the staff's working conditions.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important that caregivers and management working with older people realize that they, together with them and their relatives, are a part of society and that all individuals are influenced by the discourse of that society.

Keywords
caregivers;latent content analysis;long-term care;older people;relationship;relatives
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35440 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.01704.x (DOI)17727593 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, U., Unosson, M. & Kihlgren, M. (2006). Experience of postoperative recovery before discharge: patients’ views. Journal of advanced perioperative care, 2(3), 97-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experience of postoperative recovery before discharge: patients’ views
2006 (English)In: Journal of advanced perioperative care, ISSN 1470-5664, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study focuses on a subgroup of a larger group of patients included in a double-blind, randomised trial with music, music in combination with therapeutic suggestions or control intervention during hysterectomy under general anaesthesia (Nilsson et al 2001).The purpose of this study was to describe patients' experiences of postoperative recovery before discharge from hospital, in two intervention-with-music groups in relation to experience of the patients in a control group.Thirty-one women who underwent abdominal hysterectomy under general anaesthesia were interviewed on their last postoperative day at the hospital. The interviews were analysed with thematic and manifest content analysis.The findings showed that patients experienced recovery in terms of a 'sense of caring', a 'sense of recovery' and a 'sense of coping: When comparing the three intervention groups there was no difference in patients' experiences of caring, recovery or coping.There was, however, a significant difference gained from the manifest content analysis in experience of fatigue, with the patients in the music group experiencing it more positively.The patients described caring in terms of being either cared for or not cared for, which created either positive or negative feelings such as security and calmness, or isolation and loneliness.'Sense of recovery' was shown as a physical and physiological recovery process in terms of pain, nausea and fatigue. In comparing frequencies of reported pain, nausea and fatigue in all three groups together it was found that pain was described positively more often than negatively while the opposite was true for nausea and fatigue.The women also revealed different ways of coping during the recovery process, such as trying to look at the problem objectively, positive thinking, distraction and use of supportive resources. In conclusion the results of the present study show that intraoperative music therapy can make the experience of postoperative fatigue more positive and this finding, together with the results from the main study (Nilsson et al 2001), gives a more complete view of patients' experiences of postoperative recovery after presence or absence of intervention.

National Category
Surgery Nursing
Research subject
Surgery; Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24531 (URN)
Available from: 2012-08-17 Created: 2012-08-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Mamhidir, A.-G., Ljunggren, G., Kihlgren, M., Kihlgren, A. & Wimo, A. (2006). Underweight, weight loss and related risk factors among older adults in sheltered housing: a Swedish follow-up study. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 10(4), 255-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Underweight, weight loss and related risk factors among older adults in sheltered housing: a Swedish follow-up study
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2006 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Underweight and weight loss are important factors in detecting malnutrition.

OBJECTIVE: To describe underweight, weight loss and related nutritional factors after 12 months among individuals 75 years or older and living in sheltered housing. A further aim was to identify possible risk factors associated with underweight and weight loss.

DESIGN: This is a part of a cross-sectional follow-up study from a county in Sweden, examining the disabilities, resources and needs of 719 older adults in sheltered housing units. Data were collected twice, with a 12-month interval using the Resident Assessment Instrument.

RESULTS: Among the 503 remaining chronically ill individuals with cognitive and functional disabilities, 35% were classified as underweight at the initial assessment and 38% at the second, a non-significant difference. A further analysis showed 39% had decreased weight, 27% remained stable and 28% gained weight. A weight loss of 5% occurred in 27% of the older adults and a loss of 10% occurred in 14%. Risk factors associated with being underweight and weight loss, using scales derived from the instrument were cognitive and functional decline. Dementia and Parkinson's disease, eating dependencies and constipation were the strongest risk factors when analyzed as single items.

CONCLUSION: A high percentage was underweight or exhibited weight loss and several risk factors were identified. Ensuring adequate nutritional status in individuals with a variety of diseases and declining health status is challenging. Increased combined efforts using a wide range of measures, nutritional programs and routines need to be regularly implemented.

Keywords
underweight; weight loss; risk factors; older adults; sheltered housing
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35438 (URN)000240255700005 ()16886095 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sørlie, V., Kihlgren, A. & Kihlgren, M. (2005). Meeting ethical challenges in acute nursing care as narrated by registered nurses. Nursing Ethics, 12(2), 133-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting ethical challenges in acute nursing care as narrated by registered nurses
2005 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 133-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Five registered nurses were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation by five researchers into the narratives of five enrolled nurses (study 1, published in Nursing Ethics 2004), five registered nurses (study 2) and 10 patients (study 3) describing their experiences in an acute care ward at one university hospital in Sweden. The project was developed at the Centre for Nursing Science at Orebro University Hospital. The ward in question was opened in 1997 and provides care for a period of up to three days, during which time a decision has to be made regarding further care elsewhere or a return home. The registered nurses were interviewed concerning their experience of being in ethically difficult care situations in their work. Interpretation of the theme 'ethical problems' was left to the interviewees to reflect upon. A phenomenological hermeneutic method (inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur) was used in all three studies. The most prominent feature revealed was the enormous responsibility present. When discussing their responsibility, their working environment and their own reactions such as stress and conscience, the registered nurses focused on the patients and the possible negative consequences for them, and showed what was at stake for the patients themselves. The nurses demonstrated both directly and indirectly what they consider to be good nursing practices. They therefore demand very high standards of themselves in their interactions with their patients. They create demands on themselves that they believe to be identical to those expected by patients.

Keywords
acute care; conscience; ethics; narrative; registered nurses; responsibility; stress; working environment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35436 (URN)10.1191/0969733005ne770oa (DOI)15791783 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Häggström, E., Skovdahl, K., Fläckman, B., Kihlgren, A. L. & Kihlgren, M. (2005). Work satisfaction and dissatisfaction: caregivers' experiences after a two-year intervention in a newly opened nursing home. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 14(1), 9-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work satisfaction and dissatisfaction: caregivers' experiences after a two-year intervention in a newly opened nursing home
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2005 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 9-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate, from the narratives of nine enrolled nurses and one nurses' aide directly involved in patient care, the deeper meaning of work satisfaction and dissatisfaction when working with the older people.

BACKGROUND: Both nationally and internationally, there is little research documented regarding the working situation of the enrolled nurses and nurses' aides who make up the majority of care for older people today. With this in mind, it is important to focus on how these occupational groups experience their work with the older residents in municipal care, following a two-year intervention.

DESIGN: The study is part of a larger longitudinal study, with a quasi-experimental design within the municipal system of care for older people in Sweden. The investigation was carried out following a two-year intervention, which included: education, support and clinical supervision.

METHOD: The interviews were performed 12 and 24 months after start of the intervention and were analysed with a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by Ricoeur's philosophy.

RESULTS: The findings from these narratives illustrated a change compared with the findings from the first interviews, when the nursing home had just opened. There was a shift from a dominance of dissatisfaction with work, to a dominance of work satisfaction and this was expressed in the following themes: experience of a changed perspective, experience of open doors, and experience of closed doors. Each theme emerged from several different subthemes and each subtheme that had been expressed in the caregivers' narratives was interpreted.

CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that the caregivers' experience of work satisfaction in the workplace exceeded their experience of dissatisfaction and that the intervention, consisting of: education, support, and supervision might have facilitated this positive development where the older residents were prioritized. It also shows that communication and understanding between management and staff had increased as the nursing home had opened.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings can be used to help to prevent work dissatisfaction, and thereby increase work satisfaction for caregivers working in nursing homes.

Keywords
intervention, long-term care, supervision, work satisfaction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35435 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.00977.x (DOI)000226399300002 ()15656843 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-13544263457 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Skovdahl, K., Larsson Kihlgren, A. & Kihlgren, M. (2004). Dementia and aggressivenes: stimulated recall interveiws with care-givers after video-recorded interactions. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 13(4), 515-525
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dementia and aggressivenes: stimulated recall interveiws with care-givers after video-recorded interactions
2004 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 515-525Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In a previous study, nine caregivers and two residents with dementia showing aggressive behaviour, were video recorded. Caregivers who reported problems when dealing with such behaviour and caregivers, who did not, were included in this study.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to obtain insight into the reasoning of the caregivers who had reported problems when dealing with older people with dementia and aggressiveness and those who did not relative to their respective video-recorded interactions with these residents. A further aim was to gain insight by discussing their reasoning in relation to each other.

Method: Stimulated recall interviews were carried out with all the caregivers who had been video taped in the previous study. The text was analysed by thematic content analysis.

Findings: Two main ways of thinking and discussing the care situations emerged. The caregivers, who had reported problems in handling behavioural and psychiatric symptoms in dementia earlier, reasoned that they were more focused on their duties, this included being responsible for the resident receiving her weekly shower. For this group of caregivers, the well being of the resident was in focus, but their attention was concentrated on the resident's well being and comfort after their shower. However, these caregivers seemed therefore unwittingly to prevent a positive interaction with the resident. The other caregivers were able to reflect spontaneously and appeared to be self-critical. This caregiver group seemed to sustain a positive interaction with the resident both during and after the shower.

Relevance to clinical practice: In this study a nurturing and supportive climate and competence seemed to be the conditions necessary to facilitate reflections and promote creativity in the caregivers such that they are able to develop possible ways of handling difficult situations like aggressiveness in residents with dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Blackwell Publishing, 2004
Keywords
Dementia, aggressiveness, stimulated recall interviews, caregivers, video-recorded interactions
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48450 (URN)10.1046/j.1365-2702.2003.00881.x (DOI)000221259500014 ()15086638 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-2442612905 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-02-22 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Sørlie, V., Kihlgren, A. L. & Kihlgren, M. (2004). Meeting ethical challenges in acute care work as narrated by enrolled nurses.. Nursing Ethics, 11(2), 179-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting ethical challenges in acute care work as narrated by enrolled nurses.
2004 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 179-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Five enrolled nurses (ENs) were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of registered nurses, ENs and patients about their experiences in an acute care ward. The ward opened in 1997 and provides patient care for a period of up to three days, during which time a decision has to be made regarding further care elsewhere or a return home. The ENs were interviewed concerning their experience of being in ethically difficult care situations and of acute care work. The method of phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was used. The most prominent feature was the focus on relationships, as expressed in concern for society's and administrators' responsibility for health care and the care of older people. Other themes focus on how nurse managers respond to the ENs' work as well as their relationships with fellow ENs, in both work situations and shared social and sports activities. Their reflections seem to show an expectation of care as expressed in their lived experiences and their desire for a particular level and quality of care for their own family members. A lack of time could lead to a bad conscience over the 'little bit extra' being omitted. This lack of time could also lead to tiredness and even burnout, but the system did not allow for more time.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35430 (URN)10.1191/0969733004ne682oa (DOI)15030025 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Forslund, K., Kihlgren, A. & Kihlgren, M. (2004). Operators' experiences of emergency calls. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 10(5), 290-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Operators' experiences of emergency calls
2004 (English)In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 290-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, the operators at emergency dispatch centres are responsible for allocating resources (e.g. ambulances, fire brigade, police) in response to calls. We analysed situations that the emergency operators experienced as difficult and their reflections on how they managed them. Interviews were conducted with all 16 emergency operators at a centre that serves a population of 275,000 and receives about 700,000 emergency calls annually. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analysis. Situations that operators experienced as difficult were characterized by uncertainty, communication difficulties and insufficient resources. Skills, knowledge and experience were regarded as important in the management of these situations, as were personal qualities such as sensitivity, insight, empathy and intuition. The emergency operators stated that they needed more guidance, feedback and education in their work. This would lead to an increased sense of certainty, which would lead to decreased stress and a better outcome for those in need.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35434 (URN)10.1258/1357633042026323 (DOI)15494088 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Häggström, E., Skovdahl, K., Fläckman, B., Kihlgren, A. L. & Kihlgren, M. (2004). To feel betrayed and to feel that you are betraying the older residents: caregivers' experiences at a newly opened nursing home. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 13(6), 687-696
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To feel betrayed and to feel that you are betraying the older residents: caregivers' experiences at a newly opened nursing home
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2004 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 687-696Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In Sweden and internationally, little research has focused on the working situation of Enrolled Nurses and Nurses' Aides who form the majority of workers in geriatric care today. With this in mind, it is important to focus on how these occupational groups experience their working situation with older residents in municipal care.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the deeper meaning of work satisfaction and work dissatisfaction at a newly opened nursing home for older residents. The study focused on the narratives supplied by the caregivers at the nursing home. The participants included: one Registered Nurse, sixteen Enrolled Nurses, and three Nurses' Aides. All were directly involved in patient care.

DESIGN: The present study is part of a larger longitudinal study within the municipal geriatric care system in Sweden, with a quasi-experimental design.

METHOD: The interviews were analysed with a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur.

RESULT: The caregivers experiences of work satisfaction and work dissatisfaction was expressed in four themes: (i) 'Experience of betrayal' describes how the staff felt let down in several ways; (ii) 'Experience of failing others' describes how the staff felt that they did not pay enough attention to older people, in several different ways; (iii) 'Experience of insufficiency' describes how the staff encountered overwhelming demands from several directions; (iv) 'Experience of work satisfaction' describes how the staff felt that they were given support in various ways. Each theme emerged from several subthemes that originated from the caregivers' narratives.

CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that the caregivers' experience of work dissatisfaction overshadows their experience of work satisfaction. It also suggests that their feelings of failing the older residents are connected to their own experiences of feeling betrayed.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings can be used when other nursing homes in municipal care are opened, as a means of preventing work dissatisfaction and increasing work satisfaction among future employees.

Keywords
long-term care, work dissatisfaction, work satisfaction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35433 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.00939.x (DOI)000223404800005 ()15317508 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-4544351464 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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