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de Boise, S. (2020). Men, masculinities and music. In: Lucas Gottzén, Ulf Mellström, Tamara Shefer (Ed.), Routledge International Handbook of Masculinity Studies: (pp. 414-424). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Men, masculinities and music
2020 (English)In: Routledge International Handbook of Masculinity Studies / [ed] Lucas Gottzén, Ulf Mellström, Tamara Shefer, London: Routledge, 2020, p. 414-424Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2020
Keywords
Music, masculinities, intersectionality, personality, queer, music industries
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Musicology; Sociology; Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80080 (URN)10.4324/9781315165165 (DOI)9781315165165 (ISBN)9781138056695 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Lindblad, K. & de Boise, S. (2020). Musical engagement and subjective wellbeing amongst men in the third age. Nordisk tidskrift for musikkterapi - Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 29(1), 20-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Musical engagement and subjective wellbeing amongst men in the third age
2020 (English)In: Nordisk tidskrift for musikkterapi - Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, ISSN 0803-9828, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 20-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This article explores the wellbeing benefits of musical engagement for men in the third age. Older men face specific health challenges such as loneliness, isolation and a heightened risk for suicide, tied to gendered norms around emotional control, and a reluctance to seek professional help. There is substantial evidence of the positive health and wellbeing outcomes from older people’s engagement in music, but no studies on older men, music and wellbeing.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 Swedish men aged 66–76, with different demographic backgrounds and engagement with music. Interviews were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis.

Results: Analysis resulted in four themes: “emotions and embodiment”, “adjusting to growing older”, “developing and maintaining friendships” and “maintaining contact as a caregiver”. Regardless of musical genre or whether singing, playing, dancing or listening to music, the men used music to come into contact with their bodies and emotions, as well as improving relationships and social contacts. In particular, men as caregivers to sick partners benefited from sharing music with their partner, thus improving the quality of the relationship.

Discussion: This study shows that engagement with music fills deep psychological and social/emotional needs for the participants, in both “being” with the music and “doing” musical activities, where also talking about music is highlighted as an important part of the musical engagement. The results have implications for the field of music therapy, in that it foregrounds music therapists’ potentially important role in developing opportunities for older men to engage with music.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Men, ageing, wellbeing, music, emotions, masculinity
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology; Gender Studies; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75777 (URN)10.1080/08098131.2019.1646791 (DOI)000480950000001 ()2-s2.0-85070917599 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Äldre män, musik och hälsa
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2020-01-13
de Boise, S. (2019). Editorial: is masculinity toxic?. Norma, 14(3), 147-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: is masculinity toxic?
2019 (English)In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 147-151Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Toxic masculinity, critical studies on men and masculinities, psychology, power
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80079 (URN)10.1080/18902138.2019.1654742 (DOI)2-s2.0-85071660247 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
de Boise, S. (2019). Gender Mainstreaming in the Music Industries: Perspectives from Sweden and the UK. In: Catherine Strong and Sarah Raine (Ed.), Towards Gender Equality in the Music Industry: Education, Practice and Strategies for Change (pp. 117-130). London: Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Mainstreaming in the Music Industries: Perspectives from Sweden and the UK
2019 (English)In: Towards Gender Equality in the Music Industry: Education, Practice and Strategies for Change / [ed] Catherine Strong and Sarah Raine, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, p. 117-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019
Keywords
gender equality, gender mainstreaming, balance, music industries
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology; Gender Studies; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78326 (URN)9781501345500 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-02 Created: 2019-12-02 Last updated: 2019-12-02Bibliographically approved
de Boise, S. (2019). Tackling gender inequalities in music: A comparative study of policy responses in the UK and Sweden. The International Journal of Cultural Policy, 25(4), 486-499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tackling gender inequalities in music: A comparative study of policy responses in the UK and Sweden
2019 (English)In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 486-499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cross-disciplinary research has highlighted the persistence of gender inequalities across music scenes. However, the way in which cultural policy shapes responses to gender inequalities in music has been relatively underexplored. This article draws on research from Swedish and UK contexts, supporting analysis with reference to 9 key-stakeholder interviews from both. Comparing perspectives from ‘more’ and ‘less’ gender-equal contexts, with sufficiently different cultural policy traditions, the article explores how responses to gender inequalities in music are influenced by ‘cultural democratic’ and ‘arm’s length’ approaches. It demonstrates that, as a result of these traditions, there is a comparatively more interventionist approach in Sweden at a national level, whereas the lack of central government response in the UK has encouraged more market-oriented solutions. It suggests that this ‘arm’s length’ approach necessitates different grassroots organisational strategies in order to affect change but notes that these, alongside austerity agendas, are insufficient in the long term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Music policy, gender inequalities, interventionist, arm’s length, market-oriented
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology; Sociology; Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58133 (URN)10.1080/10286632.2017.1341497 (DOI)000466861500006 ()2-s2.0-85021102268 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
de Boise, S. (2019). The Performing Rights of Man: The Global Music Industries and Transnational Hegemonies of Men (1ed.). In: Jeff Hearn, Ernesto Vasquez del Aguila, Marina Hughson (Ed.), Unsustainable Institutions of Men: Transnational Dispersed Centres, Gender Power, Contradictions (pp. 155-171). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Performing Rights of Man: The Global Music Industries and Transnational Hegemonies of Men
2019 (English)In: Unsustainable Institutions of Men: Transnational Dispersed Centres, Gender Power, Contradictions / [ed] Jeff Hearn, Ernesto Vasquez del Aguila, Marina Hughson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 155-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Advances in Feminist Studies and Intersectionality
Keywords
masculinities, music industries
National Category
Gender Studies Sociology Musicology
Research subject
Gender Studies; Musicology; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71266 (URN)9781138093003 (ISBN)9781315107141 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
de Boise, S. (2018). Book Review: Masculinities in Contemporary American Culture: An Intersectional Approach to the Complexities and Challenges of Male Identity [Review]. Men and Masculinities, 21(5), 759-761
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review: Masculinities in Contemporary American Culture: An Intersectional Approach to the Complexities and Challenges of Male Identity
2018 (English)In: Men and Masculinities, ISSN 1097-184X, E-ISSN 1552-6828, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 759-761Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70489 (URN)10.1177/1097184X18761515 (DOI)000450319200011 ()
Note

Thomas Keith. 2017. Masculinities in Contemporary American Culture: An Intersectional Approach to the Complexities and Challenges of Male Identity. New York: Routledge. 442 pp. $65.95 (paperback), ISBN 9781138818071

Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
de Boise, S. (2018). Gender Inequalities and Higher Music Education: Comparing the UK and Sweden. British Journal of Music Education, 35(1), 23-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Inequalities and Higher Music Education: Comparing the UK and Sweden
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Music Education, ISSN 0265-0517, E-ISSN 1469-2104, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whilst the impact of gender inequalities has been studied in relation to music education,especially in the UK, relatively little has been written about their impact on higher musiceducation (HME). This article compares data on HME programs and courses, in the UK andSweden, from 2010 to 2014. It looks at similarities and differences in the numbers of menand women who applied to HME subjects, compared to those who were offered a place ontheir chosen program or course, in both nations. Through this it demonstrates that whilst aSwedish HME appears to show less institutional discrimination against women, there arestill similar transnational divisions in men’s and women’s HME subject choices. Howeverthe article uses these data to build on existing critiques around a need for intersectionalunderstandings of gender inequalities, before arguing that a critique of neoliberalism isessential to tackling gender inequalities in HME.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
gender inequality, gender inequalities, music education, higher music education
National Category
Musicology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Musicology; Musicology esp. Musical Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61945 (URN)10.1017/S0265051717000134 (DOI)000430061900003 ()2-s2.0-85032175976 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Department of Education

Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
de Boise, S. (2018). The personal is political … just not always progressive: Affective interruptions and their promise for CSMM. Norma, 13(3-4), 158-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The personal is political … just not always progressive: Affective interruptions and their promise for CSMM
2018 (English)In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 13, no 3-4, p. 158-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM), a well-established argument has been that white, heterosexual, middle-class men practice emotional repression as a means of maintaining social power. Whilst CSMM have often overlooked emotions, there is an increasing body of work which argues that men both have an active understanding of their emotional lives and that men’s emotional lives have significantly changed. Crucially, emotions are important for exploring how men’s practice connects to structure; what has been called ‘the problem of social embodiment’. However, recent perspectives on emotions and masculinities may over-emphasise the gender-progressive effects of men discussing emotions, tending to overlook how ‘semi-’ and ‘non-conscious’ forms of men’s embodiment shape far less progressive trends and even how discourses around ‘softening masculinity’ may support various forms of misogynstic behaviour. This article argues that critical feminist ‘turns to affect’ can help foreground the problem of social embodiment in CSMM in less deterministic ways, without neglecting intersectional questions of power. To illustrate potential uses for affect in CSMM, the article adopts Wetherell’s concepts of ‘affective practice’ in combination with Ahmed’s notion of ‘happy objects’ through an exploration of three key case studies: online masculinist rage; ‘nice guy’ discourse and nationalist politics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Emotion, affective practice, critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM), softening masculinity
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Gender Studies; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57661 (URN)10.1080/18902138.2017.1325098 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019183404 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-15 Created: 2017-05-15 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
de Boise, S. (2017). Addressing Gender Inequalities in Music: Sweden as a Comparative Case Study. In: : . Paper presented at International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM Norden), Popular Music in the Nordic Countries, Oslo, Norway, September 14, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing Gender Inequalities in Music: Sweden as a Comparative Case Study
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increasing media attention has been given to gender inequalities within the music industries, and across genres, in global Northern nations. Whilst noting that gender inequalities exist in different genres is not new, their persistence, as well as identifying successes in strategies to change them, require further exploration.In this respect, Sweden, a country with an international reputation for comparatively greater equality between binary genders, as well as popular music ‘folkbildning’ traditions, provides an important case study.This paper will address how notions of gender equality are constructed in activist and policy measures in Sweden. It notes how these influence and, in turn, are influenced by material resources which shape strategies in different ways. Drawing from 10 interviews with key-stakeholders in the UK and Sweden, as well as comparative policy analysis, the paper argues that both ‘cultural democratic’ and ‘gender mainstreaming’ traditions help to counter entrenched sexism and misogyny across genres. At the same time, it also advocates the need to extend and develop these in order to integrate more firmly intersectional understandings of equality as both an ethical and aesthetic concern.

Keywords
Music, cultural policy, cultural democracy, Sweden
National Category
Musicology Gender Studies
Research subject
Musicology; Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64588 (URN)
Conference
International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM Norden), Popular Music in the Nordic Countries, Oslo, Norway, September 14, 2017
Available from: 2018-01-26 Created: 2018-01-26 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9067-9496

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