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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Bergh, A., Arneback, E. & Tryggvason, Á. (2020). On teachers professional ambivalence´when colleagues express racism. In: : . Paper presented at AERA, American Educational Research Association, San Fransisco, USA, April 17-21, 2020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On teachers professional ambivalence´when colleagues express racism
2020 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper sheds light on how teachers act and reflect on their actions in response to expressions of racism among colleagues. The empirical data consists of qualitative interviews with 27 high school teachers in Sweden, but, in order to dig deeper into the experiences of teachers, this paper focuses on three teachers (Tove, Fatima and Hannah). The result points at a professional ambivalence on how to act, since there is no common ground among teachers for how to act when colleagues express racism. To act against racism comes at high costs and very much depends on each teacher’s previous experiences of life and work. Consequently, each teacher is provided a unique space and resource base for reflection and action.

Keywords
professionalism, teacher, anti-racist action, colleagues, Sweden
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78476 (URN)
Conference
AERA, American Educational Research Association, San Fransisco, USA, April 17-21, 2020
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-12-06 Created: 2019-12-06 Last updated: 2019-12-06
Tryggvason, Á. & Öhman, J. (2019). Deliberation and agonism: Two different approaches to the political dimension of environmental and sustainability education. In: Katrien Van Poeck, Leif Östman and Johan Öhman (Ed.), Sustainable Development Teaching: Ethical and Political Challenges (pp. 115-124). Milton Park and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deliberation and agonism: Two different approaches to the political dimension of environmental and sustainability education
2019 (English)In: Sustainable Development Teaching: Ethical and Political Challenges / [ed] Katrien Van Poeck, Leif Östman and Johan Öhman, Milton Park and New York: Routledge, 2019, p. 115-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Discussions about environmental and sustainability issues in classrooms can bring different political visions, opinions and conflicts to the fore. From a pluralistic perspective on environmental and sustainability education (ESE), such political differences and conflicts can be seen as a suitable starting point for teaching, rather than as an obstacle to overcome. But how can teachers approach this political dimension of ESE? This chapter outlines deliberation and agonism as two different approaches to the political dimension of ESE. With a deliberative approach, the role of rational and respectful communication is underscored as is the ideal to reach for consensus in classroom discussions. With an agonistic approach, the role of emotions, and how they are intertwined with political visions in sustainability issues, are highlighted. From an agonistic perspective, the teacher should not aim for a consensus in classroom discussions, but instead aim at enabling conflicts and pluralism to have a democratic outlet in discussions. A main point of this chapter is that deliberation and agonism should be seen as two different approaches to the political dimension in ESE, as they draw on different ideas about classrooms and conflicts and have different educational consequences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Milton Park and New York: Routledge, 2019
Series
Routledge studies in sustainability
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74393 (URN)9780815357537 (ISBN)9781351124348 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-24 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Tryggvason, Á. (2019). How to End a Discussion: Consensus or Hegemony?. Democracy & Education, 27(2), 1-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to End a Discussion: Consensus or Hegemony?
2019 (English)In: Democracy & Education, ISSN 1085-3545, E-ISSN 2164-7992, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By taking the vantage point of agonistic pluralism, the aim is to enter into dialogue with Samuelsson’s theoretical development of consensus as an educational aim for classroom discussions. The response highlights three points of interest in the deliberative conception of consensus. The first point relates to the problem of exclusion, which Samuelsson clearly framed as something that concerns deliberative theory and agonistic theory. The second point is about the relation between conflict and consensus and the kind of conflict that is compatible with Samuelsson’s idea of consensus. The concluding part of this response is an exploration of how the agonistic concept of hegemony could function as an alternative aim for ending classroom discussions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Graduate School of Education and Counseling at Lewis & Clark in Portland, Oregon, 2019
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77424 (URN)
Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Tryggvason, Á. & Mårdh, A. (2019). Political emotions in environmental and sustainability education. In: Katrien Van Poeck, Leif Östman and Johan Öhman (Ed.), Sustainable Development Teaching: Ethical and Political Challenges (pp. 234-242). Milton Park and New York, NY, USA: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political emotions in environmental and sustainability education
2019 (English)In: Sustainable Development Teaching: Ethical and Political Challenges / [ed] Katrien Van Poeck, Leif Östman and Johan Öhman, Milton Park and New York, NY, USA: Routledge, 2019, p. 234-242Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Environmental and sustainability education (ESE) has a political dimension and is intertwined with questions of emotions and conflicts. When discussing sustainability issues in the classroom, heated emotions and conflicts between students can arise. But discussions about sustainability issues can also lack both engagement and emotional involvement from the students, even when the teacher brings up what s/he thinks is a burning sustainability issue. A crucial question is then how to approach emotions in ESE in a non-instrumental way and where the political dimension of emotions can be put to the fore. This chapter outlines two strategies to teach with and through political emotions in environmental and sustainability education. The first strategy is simplification, which simplifies the complexity and the conflictual aspect of sustainability issues. When a classroom discussion is characterised by an emotional indifference or a lack of engagement, simplification is a strategy to approach this indifference. The second strategy is circulation, which is a way to maintain the intensity of emotions, or to (re)orientate them toward other objects and issues. When emotions run high in a discussion, circulation is a strategy to approach these emotions as productive elements of a vibrant environmental and sustainability education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Milton Park and New York, NY, USA: Routledge, 2019
Series
Routledge studies in sustainability
Keywords
Sustainable development, teaching, emotions, political dimension, simplification, circulation, conflict, consensus, Sara Ahmed, Chantal Mouffe
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74718 (URN)9780815357537 (ISBN)9781351124348 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Tryggvason, Á. (2018). Democratic Education and Agonism: Exploring the Critique from Deliberative Theory. Democracy & Education, 26(1), 1-9, Article ID 1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Democratic Education and Agonism: Exploring the Critique from Deliberative Theory
2018 (English)In: Democracy & Education, ISSN 1085-3545, E-ISSN 2164-7992, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to the current political challenges facing democratic societies, including an apparent presence of populist rhetoric, the question of how political discussions should take place in democratic education is as urgent as ever. In the last two decades, one of the most prominent approaches to this question has been the use of deliberative theory. However, the deliberative approach has been criticized from an agonistic perspective for neglecting the role of emotions in political discussions. Deliberative theorists have in turn responded to this critique and argued that the agonistic approach tends to put too much emphasis on students’ emotions and identities in political discussions. Recently, as a contribution to this debate, the idea of assimilating agonism with deliberation has been suggested as a way of overcoming the differences between agonism and deliberative theory.

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the educational debate between agonism and deliberative theory by exploring the deliberative critique from the vantage point of agonism. I claim that the deliberative critique of agonism is unfounded and based on a misreading of Mouffe’s agonistic theory. Furthermore, I argue that the attempt to assimilate agonism with deliberation is not compatible with Mouffe’s agonistic theory

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Portland, Oregon, USA: Lewis & Clark College, Graduate School of Education and Counseling, 2018
Keywords
Education, agonism, deliberative theory, political emotions, democracy
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67106 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
Bergh, A., Arneback, E. & Tryggvason, Á. (2018). Do Teachers have a Responsibility to act when Colleagues Express Racism?. In: : . Paper presented at AERA Annual Meeting (AERA 2018), New York, USA, April 13-17, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Teachers have a Responsibility to act when Colleagues Express Racism?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66253 (URN)
Conference
AERA Annual Meeting (AERA 2018), New York, USA, April 13-17, 2018
Available from: 2018-03-29 Created: 2018-03-29 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Tryggvason, Á. (2018). Om det politiska i samhällskunskap: Agonism, populism och didaktik. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Om det politiska i samhällskunskap: Agonism, populism och didaktik
2018 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Democratic education can be seen as being constituted by a political dimension in two senses. In one sense, democratic education is political because it has a politically formulated goal to educate citizens. In another sense, the practice of democratic education is in itself political, in that it constitutes a space in which students encounter different visions of and opinions about what society should be like. In the intersection of these two meanings of “the political” we find the teacher. How can teachers navigate and approach “the political” in their classrooms? Which conceptions of conflicts, emotions and identities are useful when approaching the political as an educational problem?

This thesis formulates an agonistic perspective on the political in social science education. In four articles, the thesis explores agonism and populism in relation to social science education. In focus are questions about the role that emotions, conflicts and identities should play in democratic education. Three of the four articles are theoretical investigations into the problems and potentialities of agonism and populism. The fourth article is empirically based on interviews with social science teachers and classroom observations. By synthesizing the results from these four articles, an agonistic perspective on the political in social science education is formulated. The agonistic perspective consists of four concepts: political emotions, hegemony, political presence and simplification. With these concepts, the agonistic perspective provides a theoretically informed starting point for teachers to reflect on and approach “the political” in social science education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2018. p. 138
Series
Örebro Studies in Education, ISSN 1404-9570 ; 58Örebro Studies in Educational Sciences with an Emphasis on Didactics ; 17
Keywords
Social Science Education, Democratic Education, Agonism, Populism, The Political, Political Emotions
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69664 (URN)978-91-7529-269-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-12-14, Örebro universitet, Forumhuset, Hörsal F, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Mårdh, A. & Tryggvason, Á. (2017). Democratic Education in the Mode of Populism. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 36(6), 601-613
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Democratic Education in the Mode of Populism
2017 (English)In: Studies in Philosophy and Education, ISSN 0039-3746, E-ISSN 1573-191X, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 601-613Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper seeks to bring John Dewey’s pragmatist philosophy of democratic education and the public into dialogue with Ernesto Laclau’s theory of populism. Recognizing populism as an integral aspect of democracy, rather than as its antithesis, the purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical account of populism as being of educational relevance in two respects. First, it argues that the populist logic specifies a set of formal elements by which democratic education could operate as a collective enterprise. Second, it asserts that the notion of populism supplements any congenial understanding of democratic education by bringing political demands, conflicts and affects to the fore. Finally, the paper discusses the risks and possibilities inherent in visualizing populism as an educational modus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Populism, Democratic education, The public, Demands, Affect, Antagonism
National Category
Pedagogy Philosophy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54881 (URN)10.1007/s11217-017-9564-5 (DOI)000412461800001 ()2-s2.0-85009848651 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

LUN (The Board of Teacher Education) at Örebro University

Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
Bergh, A. & Tryggvason, Á. (2017). Har lärare ett ansvar att agera när kollegor ger uttryck för rasism?. In: : . Paper presented at Rasism och välfärd, symposiet "Att motverka rasism inom skolväsendet", Uppsala, Sweden, October 11-13, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Har lärare ett ansvar att agera när kollegor ger uttryck för rasism?
2017 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Uttryck av rasism är utmanande frågor som lärare möter och hanterar i och omkring undervisningen. Läroplanen är tydlig med att lärare har ett ansvar att motverka alla former av rasism i skolan. Men hur agerar lärare när kollegor ger uttryck för rasism? Den här presentationen utforskar ett ansvar som många gånger är osäkert och riskfyllt.

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64991 (URN)
Conference
Rasism och välfärd, symposiet "Att motverka rasism inom skolväsendet", Uppsala, Sweden, October 11-13, 2017
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved
Arneback, E., Bergh, A. & Tryggvason, Á. (2017). Help, my colleague expresses racism!: On professional ambivalence and moral responsibility. In: : . Paper presented at EtihCo Conference: What may be learnt in ethics? Present and future conceptions of ethical competence, Gothenburg, Sweden, December 11-13, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Help, my colleague expresses racism!: On professional ambivalence and moral responsibility
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This contribution is based on an ongoing study on teachers' anti-racist actions. The project is based on John Dewey's moral philosophy with an interest in teachers' experiences of racism and anti-racism in education. In the 25 teacher interviews conducted so far, teachers express that they have a moral responsibility to counteract racism among the pupils. But what should they do when a colleague expresses racism?

Our study shows that this is a common experience among the informants, visible in colleagues’ racist jokes, speech and actions. In situation like this, there seems to be an uncertainty about their moral responsibility leading to professional ambivalence. On the one hand, the teachers feel that they are obligated to the values in the curriculum, on the other hand, they are uncertain about whether the moral responsibility could be applied in relation to colleagues.

The interviewed teachers act in relate to this ambivalence in different ways. Some describe their moral responsibility as general and choose to counteract all kinds of racism in school, even among colleagues. Other states that this is beyond their moral responsibility as a teacher, and choose not to act or to inform the principal. The choice not to act has in previous research also been explained in terms of loyalty between colleagues. The uncertainty that occurs among the informants shows how the boundaries of moral responsibility becomes erased when moving from classroom to staff room.

National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64099 (URN)
Conference
EtihCo Conference: What may be learnt in ethics? Present and future conceptions of ethical competence, Gothenburg, Sweden, December 11-13, 2017
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0327-9989

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