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Bagger, A., Norén, E., Boistrup, L. & Lundahl, C. (2019). Digitalized national tests in mathematics: a way of increasing and securing equity?. In: Jayasree Subramanian (Ed.), PROCEEDINGS OF THE TENTH INTERNATIONAL MATHEMATICS EDUCATION AND SOCIETY CONFERENCE: Hyderabad, India January 28th to February 2nd, 2019. Paper presented at The tenth International Mathematics Education and Society conference (MES10), Hyderabad, India, Jan 28th-Feb 2nd, 2019. Hyderabad, India
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digitalized national tests in mathematics: a way of increasing and securing equity?
2019 (English)In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE TENTH INTERNATIONAL MATHEMATICS EDUCATION AND SOCIETY CONFERENCE: Hyderabad, India January 28th to February 2nd, 2019 / [ed] Jayasree Subramanian, Hyderabad, India, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

On one hand, the Swedish governing discourse on equity in the context of digitizing education portrays modernization, progress and democracy as a foundation in the equity work. On the other hand, in the context of digitized tests, equity is rather framed within a neoliberal logic while related to all individuals’ possibilities of choosing a ‘good life’, and to compete on equal terms. Not all disadvantaged groups are the target, though. It is mainly boys who are supposed be given better grades, and, in addition, students with disabilities who are supposed to (as far as possible) be able to have the opportunity to show their knowledge during the test. Language or socioeconomically diverse settings are not mentioned with regard to digitized national tests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hyderabad, India: , 2019
Keywords
Equity, National tests, Mathematics, Quality, Policy
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71668 (URN)
Conference
The tenth International Mathematics Education and Society conference (MES10), Hyderabad, India, Jan 28th-Feb 2nd, 2019
Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Gorur, R., Hamilton, M., Lundahl, C. & Sundström Sjödin, E. (2019). Politics by other means?: STS and research in education. Discourse. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 40(1), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Politics by other means?: STS and research in education
2019 (English)In: Discourse. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, ISSN 0159-6306, E-ISSN 1469-3739, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Science and Technology Studies (STS) has been surprisingly slow to become widely known and deployed in the field of education. Yet STS has a rich array of concepts and analytical methods to offer to studies of: knowledge practices and epistemic cultures; the interrelationship between states and knowledge; regulatory practices, governance and institutions; and classrooms, pedagogy, teaching and learning. Most importantly, it provides a fresh perspective on how power operates in ordering societies, disciplining actors and promoting ideas and practices. In this paper, we provide an introduction to STS and elaborate what it offers education scholars. Using examples from the emerging body of STS work in the field of education, and in particular from the papers in this special issue, we argue that STS is not only useful, but an exciting and generative form of critique - one that is especially suited to investigating contemporary issues in education policies and practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Science and Technology Studies (STS), Actor-Network Theory (ANT), politics of the mundane, knowledge practices, education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71532 (URN)10.1080/01596306.2018.1549700 (DOI)000454587300001 ()2-s2.0-85059353888 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2019-01-17Bibliographically approved
Guror, R., Hamilton, M., Lundahl, C. & Sundström Sjödin, E. (Eds.). (2019). Special Issue: Politics by other means: STS and research in education. Taylor & Francis Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Special Issue: Politics by other means: STS and research in education
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Series
Discourse: Studies in the cultural politics of education, ISSN 0159-6306, E-ISSN 1469-3739 ; Vol. 40:1
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71794 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-23 Created: 2019-01-23 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, C. & Primus, F. (2019). The hidden work in international knowledge production - acknowledging the efforts of a managing editor in the 1980s. In: : . Paper presented at 63rd Annual Conference, Education for Sustainability (CIES 2019), San Francisco, USA, April 14-18, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The hidden work in international knowledge production - acknowledging the efforts of a managing editor in the 1980s
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In his influential book A social history of knowledge Peter Burke writes: “Intellectuals are masters of some kinds of knowledge, but other fields of expertise or ‘know-how’ are cultivated by such groups as bureaucrats, artisans, peasants, midwives and popular healers.” (Burke 2000: 14). The history of knowledge cannot just be understood from the perspective of successful scholars and great thinkers. This of course also applies to the knowledge of comparative education. To understand the complex process of knowledge production it is vital to include further and especially peripheral perspectives (Haraway 1988: 583f) who might not be visible at first sight.

In Torsten Husén’s - one of the founding ‘fathers’ of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement(IEA) - archive regarding The Encyclopedia of International Education (IEE) we encountered the publisher’s managing editor Barbara Barrett. She is figuratively speaking a midwife - not at random typically a rather female role - in the history of comparative education. Barrett in many different ways helped giving birth to both IEE editions (1984, 1995) and thus contributed to the IEE’s knowledge production. Nevertheless, by not being part of the list of references, which are essential support of knowledge claims in academia (Latour 1987), she seems to be a forgotten female knowledge worker in the field of comparative education. Theoretically based on the ‘practice turn’ within the sociology of knowledge (Camic, Gross & Lamont 2011) this paper aims to give identity to knowledge workers like Barrett, who might be mentioned in a preface, but are rarely acknowledged further.

The archive offers 3852 pages of correspondence between the editors-in-chief, publisher’s staff like the managing editor, section editors and commissioned authors. Hereby it allows detailed insights in the social process of the IEE production. Not only by numbers - 447 pages of correspondence which are explicitly related to Barrett by the archive label - the fundamental role of the managing editor in the process becomes apparent but also through closer reading. By applying the Qualitative Content Analysis (Schreier 2012) it is possible to show a pattern of Barretts influence and give qualitative insights in the way she was administratively, socially and content-related involved in the knowledge production.

Thus, the study considers historical material with an ethnographic perspective.The origins of the powerful contemporary international research organizations, such as IEA, in education and their increasing influence in the shaping of national and transnational education governance lie in the construction of new research networks, associations and publications in post-war Europe (e.g. Hofstetter & Schneuwly, 2004). Approaches contributing to understanding the history of educational research since then emphasize for example the role of research institutes (and inter­national conferences or international networks in general (Lawn, 2008).Access to the unique archive of Professor Torsten Huséngives the opportunity to reconstruct circumstances and the production process of the IEE as an example of an publication in and cause for interational networks and associations in the second half of the twentieth century. The archive makes it possible toexplore knowledge production in retrospect. By analysing archive material, it is possible to recreate a kind of social science laboratory in retrospective which allows to trace networks between humans and non-humans, and their actions; here it is possible to retrace how they performed the IEE. Therefore, we can speak of ethnography being applied on historical texts (Nimmo 2011).

The study view IEE both as a network and an inscription and focus on Barretts role within it. IEE consists of several hundred individuals in different positions and practices in relation to each other, as well as of material conditions such as funding, typewriters, papers, letters, software, etc. This socio-material network materializes: it generates inscriptions such as headings and articles that follow particular standards. IEE as a network extends and expands across time, space and language – it travels through its members, who meet at conferences and symposia all over the world and correspond from a distance. Finally, the outcome, the encyclopedia itself, becomes part of new networks; it circulates around the world (Schreiwer and Martinez 2004), gathers allies, shapes thoughts and actions, gets quoted, and grows in strength – it even becomes a standard reference work. However, after some years, it becomes obsolete. 

The growth of a network of comparative education required actors and mediators that were able to translate between human and non-human entities from all over the world. Torsten Husén was such an actor, but so was Barbara Barrett, working in the shadows of the researchers. Partially she functioned as an intermediator enabling them to meet and correspond with each other and partially as a mediator, who negotiated, persuaded, forced and also translated between them. Without someone performing these functions in the network of the IEE, the end result would not have been the inscripted, materialized encyclopedia.

Bibliography

Burke, P. (2000):  A Social History of Knowledge: From Gutenberg to Diderot. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Camic, C., Gross, N. & Lamont, M. (eds.) (2011): Social knowledge in the making. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Haraway, D.(1988): Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective. Feminist Studies,vol.14 1988, No 3, p. 575-599.

Hofstetter, R & Schneuwly, B. (2004), Introduction: Educational Sciences in Dynamic and Hybrid Institutionalization, Paedagogica Historica 40(5/6): 569–589.

Husén, T. & Postlethwaite, T. N. (eds.) (1985): The International Encyclopedia of Education: Research and Studies. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Latour, B. (1987): Science in action: how to follow scientists and engineers through society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Lawn, M. (2008) (ed), An Atlantic Crossing? The Work of the International Examination Inquiry, Its Researchers, Methods and Influence. Oxford: Symposium Books.

Nimmo, R. 2011. “Actor-Network Theory and Methodology: Social Research in a More-Than-Human World.” Methodological Innovations Online 6(3): 108-119.

Schreier, Margrit (2012): Qualitative content analysis in practice. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications.

 

 

 

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71822 (URN)
Conference
63rd Annual Conference, Education for Sustainability (CIES 2019), San Francisco, USA, April 14-18, 2019
Note

Accepted to the CIES 2019 conference

Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, C. & Hultén, M. (2018). Betyg och bedömning i en marknadsutsatt skola. In: Fejes, A. & Dahlstedt, M. (Ed.), Skolan, marknaden och framtiden: . Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Betyg och bedömning i en marknadsutsatt skola
2018 (Swedish)In: Skolan, marknaden och framtiden / [ed] Fejes, A. & Dahlstedt, M., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62687 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-19 Created: 2017-11-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, C. (2018). Exhibit with emotions. In: : . Paper presented at International Standing Conference for the History of Education (ISCHE 40), Berlin, Germany, August 29 - September 1, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exhibit with emotions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Whereas early 19th century international comparisons were mainly found in travelling accounts, the second half of the 19th century offered new ways of comparison through international exhibitions (Dittrich, 2010). The international World’s fairs were among the “few genuinely international cultural institutions” of their time (ibid., 17). 

During the late 20th century Sweden participated with exhibitions at the World’s fairs, roughly, every third year, where industry and art products were put on display, but also products and information from the education system. How come Sweden started to participate at these early international comparisons? What arguments were used, what critical points were raised and what experiences grew out from this? 

Investigating the mediating role that the World’s fairs had on educational ideas and technologies implies a transnational perspective on history. Transnational history is about contacts among communities, polities and societies and their exchanges, interactions, integrations and de-coupling. Having a transnational perspective on history means acknowledging and assessing foreign contributions to design, taste, strategies, politics and future hopes (Saunier, 2013). We also need to acknowledge the emotions involved when it comes to internationalization.

In the case of education, the power of the World’s fair exhibitions has been related to the notion of accountability (Sobe & Boven, 2014) and to aesthetic normativity (Lundahl, 2016). In this paper governing with exhibitions is elaborated as an ‘appeal to emotion’ or argumentum ad passions. Appeals to emotions are about the manipulation of the recipient's emotions in order to win an argument, especially in the absence of factual evidence. This can include appeal to consequences, to fear, to flattery, to pity, to ridicule, to spite, to wishful thinking etc (Nico Frijda, Antony Manstead and Sasha Bem, 2000; Kimball, 2004). 

This paper is about the arguments used in when Sweden started to participate at the World’s fairs. More specifically it is about the parliamentary debates in Sweden where it was decided how much Sweden could afford to pay for participating with own exhibits at ten major World’s fairs (1851 – 1904), and the arguments used. The paper will show that the winning arguments were more often about nationalism than about international gains. Further, if rational ‘cost benefit’ arguments would have won, Sweden would most probably not have participated, rather, emotional arguments – often related to patriotism – tended to nullify every other kind of argument, allowing for participation. 

The paper highlights the importance to take into account appeal to emotions as a way of governing that sometimes actually can be more, or at least as, successful as commonly recognized governing strategies such as ‘governing by numbers’. 

References 

Dittrich, Klaus (2010), Experts Going Transnational: Education at World Exhibitions during the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century. University of Portsmouth.

Kimball, Robert H. “A Plea for Pity.” Philosophy and Rhetoric. Vol. 37, Issue 4. (2004): 301–316. Print.

Lundahl, C. (2016). Swedish Education Exhibitions and Aesthetic Governing at World's Fairs in the Late Nineteenth Century. Nordic Journal of Educational History3, no. 2 (2016): 3–30.

Frijda, Nico H., Antony SR Manstead, and Sacha Bem. "The influence of emotions on beliefs." Emotions and beliefs: How feelings influence thoughts (2000): 1-9.

Saunier, P-Y (2013). Transnational history. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Noah W. Sobe and David T. Boven, ”Nineteenth-century World’s Fairs as accountability systems: Scopic Systems, Audit Practices and Educational Data,” Education Policy Analysis Archives, 22no. 118 (2014)

 

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71825 (URN)
Conference
International Standing Conference for the History of Education (ISCHE 40), Berlin, Germany, August 29 - September 1, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
Bergh, A., Englund, T., Lundahl, C., Nordin, A., Sundberg, D. & Wahlström, N. (2018). Forskningssammanställning kring läroplansteori, läroplansutveckling och läroplansutvärdering. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forskningssammanställning kring läroplansteori, läroplansutveckling och läroplansutvärdering
Show others...
2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2018. p. 79
Keywords
Läroplansteori, läroplansutveckling, läroplansutvärdering
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74791 (URN)
Note

Forskningssammanställning beställd av Skolverket.

Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-07-25Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, C. & Serder, M. (2018). “I have read some articles on the subject” – selective truths in the education debate. In: : . Paper presented at American Educational Research Association (AERA 2018), New York City, NY, USA, April 13-17, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“I have read some articles on the subject” – selective truths in the education debate
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of post-truths – or, rather, a version that we call selective truths – in educational debate. Specifically, we look at how references to PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) and/or to educational research are used as arguments for various reforms. We investigate this in two sets of data: press media and Parliamentary debates between 2000 and 2018. Our main findings are (1) that educational research has become less interesting to public debate, only to be replaced with references to PISA; (2) that, PISA is referred to, for almost any educational cause, in a highly selective way. 

Keywords
PISA, Educational research, media analyses, policy analyses
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71796 (URN)
Conference
American Educational Research Association (AERA 2018), New York City, NY, USA, April 13-17, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-23 Created: 2019-01-23 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Tveit, S. & Lundahl, C. (2018). New modes of policy legitimation in education: (Mis)using comparative data to effectuate assessment reform. European Educational Research Journal (online), 17(5), 631-655
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New modes of policy legitimation in education: (Mis)using comparative data to effectuate assessment reform
2018 (English)In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 631-655Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Identifying three modes of policy legitimation in education, illustrated by shifts in Swedish educational assessment and grading policies over the past decades, the article demonstrates significant trends with regards to national governments’ policymaking and borrowing. We observe a shift away from collaboracy—defined as policy legitimation located in partnership and networks of stakeholders, researchers and other experts—towards more use of supranational agencies (called agency), such as the OECD, the European Union and associated networks, as well as the use of individual consultants and private enterprises (called consultancy) to legitimate policy change. Analysing assessment and grading policies reported in Eurydice, the paper discusses functional equivalence of grading policies and validity problems related to the construction and use of policy comparisons. Illuminating the Swedish government and a consultant’s role in reviewing and recommending grading policies, the paper discusses new ‘fast policy’ modes of policy legitimation utilising comparative data to effectuate assessment reform.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Agency, collaboracy, consultancy, educational assessment, legitimacy, grading, policymaking, policy legitimation
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53737 (URN)10.1177/1474904117728846 (DOI)000441974900003 ()2-s2.0-85051763514 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-1952
Available from: 2016-12-04 Created: 2016-12-04 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, C. (2018). The ‘Beauty’ of PISA – the Politics of How PISA Scores Are Used to Represent Public Education: In session What does it mean? The role of assessment and data in public opinion. In: : . Paper presented at American Educational Research Association (AERA 2018): The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education, New York City, NY, USA, April 13-17, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ‘Beauty’ of PISA – the Politics of How PISA Scores Are Used to Represent Public Education: In session What does it mean? The role of assessment and data in public opinion
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, I offer a new perspective on the intended and unintended effects of international large-scale assessments like PISA, and investigate the image of PISA as an aesthetic artefact. Using Jacques Rancière’s diptych The Aesthetics of Politics and The Politics of Aesthetics, I analyse more than 4,000 digital images retrieved from systematic Google searches in 12 different countries. The results show clear differences between low- and high-performing countries concerning the images selected to present PISA results. There is clearly a ‘pictorial discourse’ that works in tandem with the dominant educational policies. I argue that this kind of ‘aesthetic governing’ involves the possibility of touching people in other, and maybe even more profound ways, compared to rational arguments.

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62691 (URN)
Conference
American Educational Research Association (AERA 2018): The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education, New York City, NY, USA, April 13-17, 2018
Available from: 2017-11-19 Created: 2017-11-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8173-7474

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