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Jansson-Fröjmark, MarkusORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2059-1621
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Publications (10 of 58) Show all publications
Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Norell-Clarke, A. & Linton, S. J. (2016). The role of emotion dysregulation in insomnia: Longitudinal findings from a large community sample. British Journal of Health Psychology, 21(1), 93-113
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of emotion dysregulation in insomnia: Longitudinal findings from a large community sample
2016 (English)In: British Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-107X, E-ISSN 2044-8287, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 93-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this longitudinal investigation was to examine the association between emotion regulation and future insomnia (incidence and persistence).

DESIGN: A longitudinal study in the general population.

METHODS: A survey was sent out to 5,000 individuals in the community. To those who returned the baseline questionnaire (n = 2,333), two follow-up surveys, 6 and 18 months later, were sent out and then completed by 1,887 and 1,795 individuals, respectively. The survey contained information about demographic factors, insomnia symptomatology, the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, anxiety, and depression.

RESULTS: The findings suggested that emotion regulation at baseline was not associated with the incidence or persistence of insomnia. Overall, the effect sizes were very small to medium. When examining changes in emotion regulation over time, a different pattern emerged. Partial support was established for the notion that decreases in emotion regulation were related to incident and persistent insomnia, as a decrease in emotion regulation was associated with a higher likelihood of future insomnia. Yet, the effect sizes were very small to small.

CONCLUSION: This study does partly point towards a longitudinal association between emotion dysregulation and insomnia. This might have implications for the conceptualization and management of insomnia as well as for future research.

Statement of contribution:

What is already known on this subject?

  • Previous research has indicated that emotion dysregulation might be enhanced in patients with insomnia.
  • A number of limitations have however hindered progress in understanding how emotion dysregulation is related to insomnia, such as limited research on the topic and relying solely on cross-sectional data.

What does this study add?

  • The current investigation showed that emotion dysregulation is a risk factor for the development of incident and persistent insomnia.
  • This study also shows that increased emotion dysregulation over time heightens the risk of incident and persistent insomnia.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
insomnia; sleep; epidemiology; emotion regulation; Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, insomni, sömnproblem, emotionsreglering, emotioner
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47055 (URN)10.1111/bjhp.12147 (DOI)000367827800006 ()26347204 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84954374855 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research

Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Tillfors, M., Toll, C., Branting, M., Boersma, K. & Jansson-Fröjmark, M. (2015). Allowing or fighting social anxiety: The role of psychological flexibility in a non-clinical population. Journal for Person-Oriented Research, 1(3), 151-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allowing or fighting social anxiety: The role of psychological flexibility in a non-clinical population
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2015 (English)In: Journal for Person-Oriented Research, ISSN 2002-0244, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 151-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scandinavian Society for Person-Oriented Research, 2015
Keywords
Social anxiety, psychological inflexibility, depressive symptoms, rumination, non-clinical population
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48063 (URN)10.17505/jpor.2015.16 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-06 Created: 2016-02-06 Last updated: 2018-04-26Bibliographically approved
Sunnhed, R. & Jansson-Fröjmark, M. (2015). Cognitive Arousal, Unhelpful Beliefs and Maladaptive Sleep Behaviors as Mediators in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia: A Quasi-Experimental Study. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 39(6), 841-852
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive Arousal, Unhelpful Beliefs and Maladaptive Sleep Behaviors as Mediators in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia: A Quasi-Experimental Study
2015 (English)In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, ISSN 0147-5916, E-ISSN 1573-2819, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 841-852Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose with the investigation was to examine whether improvements in pre-sleep cognitive arousal, unhelpful beliefs about sleep, and maladaptive sleep behaviors mediate the outcomes in in-person CBT-I. Fifty-eight participants with insomnia were administered either cognitive behavioral therapy or belonged to a waitlist. At pre- and post-treatment, participants completed questionnaires and sleep diaries assessing cognitive arousal, unhelpful beliefs about sleep, maladaptive sleep behaviors, insomnia severity, dysfunction, and subjective sleep parameters. Outcome measures were re-administered at a 3-month follow-up. Decreases in cognitive arousal mediated the effect on dysfunction. Reductions in unhelpful beliefs mediated the treatment effect on insomnia severity and dysfunction. Decreases in bedtime variability mediated the outcome on insomnia severity, and reductions in time in bed had a mediating effect on total wake time. Neither rise time variability nor napping mediated the improvements. A reversed model, in which the outcomes were used as mediators, showed less fit with the current data, indicating that change in the psychological processes as mediators of improvement in the outcomes was the most plausible conclusion. These findings are clearly supportive of cognitive-behavioral models of insomnia by highlighting cognitive arousal, unhelpful beliefs about sleep, and maladaptive sleep behaviors as mediators in the treatment of insomnia. The results are also important for clinical work and for testing new approaches in future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2015
Keywords
Cognitive behavioral therapy, Insomnia, Mediation, Arousal, Beliefs, Behavior
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46831 (URN)10.1007/s10608-015-9698-0 (DOI)000363965400012 ()2-s2.0-84946471189 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Sparbankstiftelsen Nya

Available from: 2015-11-27 Created: 2015-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Norell-Clarke, A., Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Tillfors, M., Holländare, F. & Engström, I. (2015). Group cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: Effects on sleep and depressive symptomatology in a sample with comorbidity. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 74, 80-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: Effects on sleep and depressive symptomatology in a sample with comorbidity
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2015 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 74, p. 80-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To investigate the effects of group CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) on insomnia and depressive symptomatology in a comorbid sample through a randomised controlled trial with a 6 month follow-up.

Methods: 64 participants were recruited through advertisements and randomised to receive CBT-I or an active control (relaxation training: RT) during four group sessions. Insomnia Severity Index and BDI-II were the primary outcome measures, assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment and at 6 month follow-up. Insomnia and depressive diagnoses, and functional impairment were assessed before and after treatment, whereas sleep diary data was gathered continuously from one week before treatment until after treatment.

Results: CBT-I was more efficient than RT in reducing insomnia severity and equally effective in reducing depressive symptoms, although CBT-I was associated with a higher proportion of remitted persons than RT, regarding both insomnia and depression diagnoses. Also, CBT-I was associated with less functional impairment, shorter sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset but both treatments had equal improvements of sleep quality, early morning awakenings and total sleep time.

Conclusion: Group CBT-I is an efficient form of insomnia-treatment for people with insomnia comorbid with depressive symptomatology. The mixed results regarding depression outcomes warrants replication and further studies into treatment mechanisms. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Insomnia, Depression, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Relaxation, Co-morbidity, RCT
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46833 (URN)10.1016/j.brat.2015.09.005 (DOI)000364269400010 ()26433466 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84943149291 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stiftelsen Professor Bror Gadelius Minnesfond

Psykiatrifonden

Research Committee of Örebro County Council, Sweden

Available from: 2015-11-27 Created: 2015-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Norell-Clarke, A., Tillfors, M., Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Holländare, F. & Engström, I. (2014). An investigation of dysfunctional beliefs as a mediator of cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia in a sample with insomnia and depression. Paper presented at 22nd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, Tallinn, Estonia, September 16-20, 2014. Journal of Sleep Research, 23, 217-217
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An investigation of dysfunctional beliefs as a mediator of cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia in a sample with insomnia and depression
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 23, p. 217-217Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43942 (URN)000349960600588 ()
Conference
22nd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, Tallinn, Estonia, September 16-20, 2014
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Norell-Clarke, A., Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Tillfors, M., Harvey, A. G. & Linton, S. J. (2014). Cognitive processes and their association with persistence and remission of insomnia: Findings from a longitudinal study in the general population. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 54, 38-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive processes and their association with persistence and remission of insomnia: Findings from a longitudinal study in the general population
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2014 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 54, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Insomnia is a common health problem that affects about 10% of the population. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the association between cognitive processes and the persistence and remission from insomnia in the general population.

Methods: In a longitudinal design, 2333 participants completed a survey on night time and daytime symptoms, and cognitive processes. Follow-up surveys were sent out six months and 18 months after the first assessment. Participants were categorised as having persistent insomnia, being in remission from insomnia or being a normal sleeper.

Results: Cognitive processes distinguished between people with persistent insomnia and normal sleepers. Specifically, worry, dysfunctional beliefs, somatic arousal, selective attention and monitoring, and safety behaviours increased the likelihood of reporting persistent insomnia rather than normal sleep. For people with insomnia, more worry about sleep at baseline predicted persistent insomnia but not remission later on. Lower selective attention and monitoring, and use of safety behaviours over time increased the likelihood of remission from insomnia. In general, these results remained, when psychiatric symptoms and medical complaints were added to the models.

Conclusions: The findings support that certain cognitive processes may be associated with persistence and remission of insomnia. Clinical implications are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Insomnia, Worry, Safety behaviours, Selective attention, Dysfunctional beliefs, Physiological arousal
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34997 (URN)10.1016/j.brat.2014.01.002 (DOI)000334009000006 ()24513668 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84893596229 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-05-09 Created: 2014-05-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Norell-Clarke, A. & Linton, S. (2014). The role of emotion dysregulation in insomnia: longitudinal findings from a large community sample. Paper presented at 22nd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, Tallinn, Estonia, September 16-20, 2014. Journal of Sleep Research, 23, 133-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of emotion dysregulation in insomnia: longitudinal findings from a large community sample
2014 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 23, p. 133-134Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43941 (URN)000349960600346 ()
Conference
22nd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, Tallinn, Estonia, September 16-20, 2014
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Jansson-Fröjmark, M. (2014). The work and social adjustment scale as a measure of dysfunction in chronic insomnia: reliability and validity. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 2(42), 186-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The work and social adjustment scale as a measure of dysfunction in chronic insomnia: reliability and validity
2014 (English)In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, ISSN 1352-4658, E-ISSN 1469-1833, Vol. 2, no 42, p. 186-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Dysfunction is an integral part of chronic insomnia. Despite this, very little effort has yet been made to design and psychometrically validate an insomnia-specific measure of dysfunction.

Aims: The purpose was to examine the psychometric properties of the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS) as a measure of dysfunction in chronic insomnia.

Method: Seventy-three patients with chronic insomnia from three subsamples participated. All the patients completed the WSAS, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and sleep diaries over one week.

Results: An exploratory factor analysis suggested a one-factor solution for the WSAS, determining dysfunction, accounting for 73.7% of the variance. The internal consistency of the WSAS was α = .91. The test-retest reliability for the WSAS items was high at .90-.99 and for the entire scale .99. A cut-off at 17 points was established, discriminating those with subclinical versus moderate or severe clinical insomnia (88% sensitivity and 78% specificity). Evidence of convergent and criterion validity was documented via (1) a significant, positive association between the WSAS and ISI and (2) a higher WSAS score among those with severe clinical insomnia, relative to those with moderate clinical and subthreshold insomnia, as well as a higher WSAS score among those with moderate clinical insomnia relative to those with subthreshold insomnia. The WSAS was also shown to be a treatment-sensitive measure for insomnia patients.

Conclusions: The WSAS appears as a reliable and valid measure of dysfunction in chronic insomnia. Additional advantages are its shortness, easiness, and treatment-sensitivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014
Keywords
Insomnia; dysfunction; impairment; scale
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28907 (URN)10.1017/S135246581200104X (DOI)000332448300005 ()23402523 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84893493309 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-05-03 Created: 2013-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Bermas, M. & Kjellén, A. (2013). Attentional bias in insomnia: the dot-probe task with pictorial stimuli depicting daytime fatigue/malaise. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37(3), 534-546
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attentional bias in insomnia: the dot-probe task with pictorial stimuli depicting daytime fatigue/malaise
2013 (English)In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, ISSN 0147-5916, E-ISSN 1573-2819, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 534-546Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals with primary insomnia (PI) have an attentional bias towards insomnia-specific stimuli, relative to normal sleepers (NS). Also, the aim was to determine if the attentional bias was characterized by vigilance or disengagement. A between-groups, matched design was employed. Forty-two individuals completed the study (PI = 21; NS = 21). Participants completed a dot-probe task with stimuli comprising insomnia-specific (fatigue/malaise) and neutral pictures. It was hypothesized that individuals with PI would show greater attentional bias to insomnia-specific stimuli compared with NS. An overall bias effect was noted. This effect was however not due to vigilance; taking into account the reaction times on neutral trials, the PI group and the NS group did not display significantly different results in reaction times to insomnia-specific pictures. On the contrary, the results suggest that the overall bias effect was due to disengagement; the PI group had significantly longer reaction times than the NS group when shifting away from the insomnia-specific pictures, relative to neutral-neutral picture presentations. The findings suggest that individuals with insomnia are not more vigilant than normal sleepers to insomnia-specific stimuli, but instead have greater difficulties in shifting away from such stimuli.

Keywords
Insomnia, Attention, Cognitive bias, Vigilance, Disengagement
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29757 (URN)10.1007/s10608-012-9486-z (DOI)000318817000013 ()
Available from: 2013-06-27 Created: 2013-06-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, N. S., Harvey, A. G., MacDonald, S., Jansson-Fröjmark, M. & Linton, S. J. (2013). Sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms in adolescence: the role of catastrophic worry. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 42(8), 1223-1233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms in adolescence: the role of catastrophic worry
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1223-1233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression is a common and debilitating disorder in adolescence. Sleep disturbances and depression often co-occur with sleep disturbances frequently preceding depression. The current study investigated whether catastrophic worry, a potential cognitive vulnerability, mediates the relationship between adolescent sleep disturbances and depressive symptoms, as well as whether there are gender differences in this relationship. High school students, ages 16–18, n = 1,760, 49 % girls, completed annual health surveys including reports of sleep disturbance, catastrophic worry, and depressive symptoms. Sleep disturbances predicted depressive symptoms 1-year later. Catastrophic worry partially mediated the relationship. Girls reported more sleep disturbances, depressive symptoms, and catastrophic worry relative to boys. The results, however, were similar regardless of gender. Sleep disturbances and catastrophic worry may provide school nurses, psychologists, teachers, and parents with non gender specific early indicators of risk for depression. Several potentially important practical implications, including suggestions for intervention and prevention programs, are highlighted. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Adolescence; Sleep; Depression; Catastrophizing; Worry; Gender
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29023 (URN)10.1007/s10964-012-9811-6 (DOI)000321973800009 ()22968332 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84880514938 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-05-14 Created: 2013-05-14 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2059-1621

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