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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Hellfeldt, K., Olsson, K., Frogner, L. & Strand, S. (2023). Processutvärdering av GVI Örebro: en strategi för att minska och förebygga utvecklingen av grovt och dödligt våld kopplat till kriminella grupper. Örebro: Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap vid Örebro universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Processutvärdering av GVI Örebro: en strategi för att minska och förebygga utvecklingen av grovt och dödligt våld kopplat till kriminella grupper
2023 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap vid Örebro universitet, 2023. p. 108
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108798 (URN)9789187789885 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-10-09 Created: 2023-10-09 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved
Frogner, L., Hellfeldt, K., Ångström, A.-K., Andershed, A.-K., Källström, Å., Fanti, K. A. & Andershed, H. (2022). Stability and Change in Early Social Skills Development in Relation to Early School Performance: A Longitudinal Study of a Swedish Cohort. Early Education and Development, 33(1), 17-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stability and Change in Early Social Skills Development in Relation to Early School Performance: A Longitudinal Study of a Swedish Cohort
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2022 (English)In: Early Education and Development, ISSN 1040-9289, E-ISSN 1556-6935, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 17-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research Findings: This study aimed to investigate the developmental path of social skills in early childhood, the associated predictors, and its impact on later school performance. This prospective longitudinal study included 2,121 children, ages 3-5 at baseline, from the general population in a mid-sized Swedish municipality. Results show both stability and change in social skills. Stable low social skills increased the risk for poor school performance, while stable high social skills increased the chance for good school performance in primary school. With some notable gender differences, both individual and family factors were significant predictors of stable low and stable high paths of social skills during early childhood.

Practice or Policy: Whether the goal is to improve children’s social skills or their performance in school, this study provides important clues for prevention. We identified several potential targets for interventions to promote early social skills development, which may in turn promote positive school performance. It is also notable that there seem to be gender differences in which factors are important, indicating the need for gender-differentiated interventions. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
early childhood, preschool, primary school, school performance, social skills
National Category
Educational Sciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-89168 (URN)10.1080/10409289.2020.1857989 (DOI)000613379600001 ()2-s2.0-85100240267 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SOFIA Gillar Skolan
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2007-2440 2016-04664
Available from: 2021-02-01 Created: 2021-02-01 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Tuvblad, C., Sild, M., Frogner, L. & Booij, L. (2019). Behavioral Genetics of Aggression and Intermittent Explosive Disorder. In: Emil Coccaro, Michael McCloskey (Ed.), Intermittent Explosive Disorder: Etiology, Assessment, and Treatment (pp. 17-35). Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral Genetics of Aggression and Intermittent Explosive Disorder
2019 (English)In: Intermittent Explosive Disorder: Etiology, Assessment, and Treatment / [ed] Emil Coccaro, Michael McCloskey, Academic Press, 2019, p. 17-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aggression has been consistently shown to have a large genetic component based on findings from behavioral genetic studies. However, candidate gene and GWA studies on aggression have not identified a significant genetic marker. This does not mean that there are no genes relevant for aggression, but possibly indicates a complex interplay between various genetic components and environmental factors/triggers in aggression. Additionally, distinct forms of aggressive behavior (e.g., reactive, proactive, direct /physical, indirect/relational) may differ in their underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The extent to which environment affects epigenetic processes may depend on genotype, as well as other factors such as age, sex, and developmental history. The nonlinear occurrence of aggression over the lifetime (. Petersen, Bates, Dodge, Lansford, & Pettit, 2015) hints the involvement of developmental processes in the manifestation of aggression. Also, pathological aggression is highly comorbid with numerous psychiatric disorders and the concept of aggression is very heterogeneous, which further increases the complexity in the search for genetic and epigenetic markers. Notably, while most clinical studies focus on antisocial personality disorder, (epi)genetic research in psychiatric disorders that have aggression as a core symptom (such as IED) is scarce. Multidisciplinary collaborative research of genetic and epigenetic factors at various ages throughout the lifespan in well-characterized clinical and nonclinical study samples is needed to further shed light on the specific genetic and epigenetic contributions to (different types of) aggression including IED.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2019
Keywords
Behavioral genetic research design, Neurobiology of Aggression, Oxytocin, Population, Tryptophan hydroxylases
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72624 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-813858-8.00002-4 (DOI)2-s2.0-85081995505 (Scopus ID)9780128138588 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2020-04-06Bibliographically approved
Frogner, L., Gibson, C. L., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2018). Childhood Psychopathic Personality and Callous-Unemotional Traits in the Prediction of Conduct Problems. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 88(2), 211-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood Psychopathic Personality and Callous-Unemotional Traits in the Prediction of Conduct Problems
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, ISSN 0002-9432, E-ISSN 1939-0025, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 211-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study analyzed data from a prospective longitudinal study of Swedish preschoolers to examine whether psychopathic traits and concurrent conduct problems predict future conduct problems (CP) across 1- and 2-year follow-ups into early childhood. We tested the predictive ability of psychopathic traits while controlling for concurrent CP, and also by combining psychopathic traits with concurrent CP. A community sample of 1,867 preschoolers (47% girls) ages 3 to 5 years at baseline was recruited from a Swedish medium-sized municipality. Results from multivariate regression analyses showed that psychopathic traits alone (without co-occurring CP) did not consistently predict continuing childhood CP, but did so, among both boys and girls, in combination with concurrent conduct problems. It is important to note that, the combination of concurrent CP and the entire psychopathic personality, that is, a 3-dimensional psychopathic construct, was a stronger predictor of continuing childhood CP than the combination of concurrent CP and Callous-Unemotional (CU) traits among boys but not among girls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2018
Keywords
callous-unemotional traits; conduct problems; early childhood; psychopathic traits
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53547 (URN)10.1037/ort0000205 (DOI)000427477500010 ()27786502 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84994236781 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Frogner, L., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2018). Psychopathic Personality Works Better than CU Traits for Predicting Fearlessness and ADHD Symptoms among Children with Conduct Problems. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 40(1), 26-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic Personality Works Better than CU Traits for Predicting Fearlessness and ADHD Symptoms among Children with Conduct Problems
2018 (English)In: Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, ISSN 0882-2689, E-ISSN 1573-3505, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 26-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children with early-onset conduct problems (CP) are at great risk for future behavior problems, and this risk seems to increase when CP co-occur with psychopathic traits. Even though studies are indicating that the entire psychopathic personality construct may be more useful in designating a meaningful subgroup of children with CP, research on psychopathic traits and CP in childhood have mainly focused on the role of callous unemotional (CU) traits. Prospective longitudinal data of 1867 3- to 5-year-olds (47% girls) followed annually for two years was used to compare groups of children with different combinations of CP and psychopathic traits on fearlessness and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Children with CP and psychopathic personality had higher baseline and stable levels of ADHD symptoms than children with CP only or children with CP and concurrent CU traits, while baseline levels of fearlessness did not differ. They were also more likely to display stable levels of the risky combination of CP and ADHD symptoms. Results were similar for boys and girls. Findings indicate that there are reasons to consider other traits and behaviors as specifiers for subgroups of children with CP over and above CU traits, in order to optimize both diagnostic practice and treatment outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Callous-unemotional traits, Conduct problems, Early childhood, Fearlessness, Psychopathic traits
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66269 (URN)10.1007/s10862-018-9651-0 (DOI)000427993800004 ()29576681 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043391139 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2007-2440
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Colins, O., Veen, V., Veenstra, M., Frogner, L. & Andershed, H. (2018). The Child Problematic Traits Inventory in a Dutch General Population Sample of 3- to 7-Year-Old Children. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 34(5), 336-343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Child Problematic Traits Inventory in a Dutch General Population Sample of 3- to 7-Year-Old Children
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 336-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Child Problematic Traits Inventory (CPTI) is a new teacher rated instrument to assess psychopathic personality traits in children. This is the first study to test the psychometric properties of the Dutch CPTI. Teachers completed the CPTI for 287 3- to 7-year old-children. Results from confirmatory factor analysis supported the proposed 3-factor structure of the CPTI. The CPTI total score and three factor scores were internally consistent and showed the expected correlations with external criterion measures that have been linked to psychopathic personality, including conduct problems, proactive and reactive aggression, and temperament. This study also provides novel evidence that CPTI factor scores were positively related to an alternative measure of callous-unemotional traits, thereby supporting the criterion validity of the CPTI scores. In conclusion, this study replicates and extends prior tests of the CPTI in Sweden and suggests that the Dutch version of the CPTI holds promise as a teacher rated tool for assessing psychopathic traits in childhood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hogrefe, 2018
Keywords
Psychopathy, assessment, Child Problematic Traits Inventory (CPTI), children, conduct problems, callous-unemotional
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53944 (URN)10.1027/1015-5759/a000347 (DOI)000458407400007 ()2-s2.0-85047503220 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Andershed, H., Frogner, L. & Andershed, A.-K. (2017). Psychopathic personality works better than CU traits for predicting fearlessness and ADHD symptoms in children with conduct problems. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic personality works better than CU traits for predicting fearlessness and ADHD symptoms in children with conduct problems
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Children with early-onset conduct problems (CP) are at great risk for future behavior problems, and this risk seems to increase when CP co-occur with psychopathic traits. Even though studies are indicating that the entire psychopathic personality construct may be more useful in designating a meaningful subgroup of children with CP, research on psychopathic traits and CP in childhood have mainly focused on the role of callous unemo-tional (CU) traits. Prospective longitudinal data of 1,867 3- to 5-year-olds (47% girls) followed annually for two years was used to compare groups of children with different combinations of CP and psychopathic traits on fearlessness and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symp-toms. Children with CP and psychopathic personality had higher baseline and stable levels of fearlessness and ADHD symptoms than children with CP only or children with CP and concurrent CU traits. They were also more likely to display stable levels of the very risky combination of CP and ADHD symptoms. Results were similar for boys and girls. Findings indicate that there are reasons to consider other traits and behaviors as specifiers for subgroups of children with CP over and above CU traits, in order to optimize both diagnostic practice and treatment outcomes.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62181 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2023-01-30Bibliographically approved
Bergstrøm, H., Frogner, L., Colins, O. F., Fanti, K. A., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2017). Psychopathic traits during early childhood: Stable over time or rapidly changing?. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic traits during early childhood: Stable over time or rapidly changing?
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Although research has shown psychopathic traits to be moderately to highly stable in late childhood and adolescence, little is known about stability in early childhood, specifically in preschool age. The current study was designed to fill this knowledge gap by assessing stability of psychopathic traits in a large community sample (n = 2,121) of three- to five-year-olds (47% girls) across a two-year time span. The sample displayed stable levels of Grandiose-Deceitful (GD), Callous-Unemotional (CU) and Impulsivity, Need for Stimulation (INS) traits. However, the degree of stability varieda cross these three traits dimensions, and by level of analysis, age, and gender. Rank-order stability ranged from low to very high, but effect sizes indicated less stability than on the mean level, where changes were detected but with small effect sizes, thus demonstrating high stability. This trend emerged for both genders, across development, and age. At an individual level, the great majority of the sample displayed stable levels of psychopathic traits to a large extent, with small gender and age differences. The current study is one of the first that investigates stability in children as young as three years old, and it highlights the possibility of measuring psychopathic traits in early childhood.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62182 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2023-01-30Bibliographically approved
Hellfeldt, K., Frogner, L., Andershed, A.-K., Källström, Å. & Andershed, H. (2017). Understanding preschool precursors to early school adjustment. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding preschool precursors to early school adjustment
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Positive early school adjustment has been suggested to provide an important base for future school performance. In fact, positive adjustment to school has emerged as one of the key factors for educational performance and lower rates of psychosocial and conduct problems. Thus, it is essential that we come to a better understanding of why some children exhibit positive early school adjustment while others do not. School adjustment is a comprehensive term, describing how children adapt both socially, behaviorally and academically, including aspects such as (i) children’s connectedness to school, i.e., liking school, (ii) children’s school involvement, i.e., school avoidance and task engagement and, (iii) children’s school performance, i.e., academic achievement. This presentation will give the outline for, and some preliminary descriptive results from a research project aimed at advancing knowledge and identifying the various developmental pathways of potential influential factors on school adjustment; early childhood risk and protective factors that are related to early positive and negative school adjustment. Potential risk and protective factors that will be studied include various preschool/school factors, family and parent-child factors, peer factors, and specific individual factors of the child. The study uses data from four waves of the SOFIA-study, an ongoing prospective longitudinal research program including all children born between 2005 and 2007 attending preschools during the spring of 2010 (>2,000 children) in a midsized Swedish municipality. The knowledge produced in this project can be used to develop strategies and interventions to promote early positive school adjustment, and to prevent early negative school adjustment.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62183 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2022-09-28Bibliographically approved
Klingzell, I., Fanti, K., Colins, O., Frogner, L., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2016). Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 47(2), 236-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions
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2016 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 236-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children with early onset of conduct problems (CP) are at risk for long lasting psychosocial problems, especially if CP co-occurs with callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Joint trajectories of CP and CU traits during early childhood were identified using data from the SOFIA study, following 2031 children longitudinally from ages 3-5 to 5-7 years. The results showed that children exhibiting stable high CP and CU traits were characterized by high levels of fearlessness, and psychopathic traits, including grandiose-deceitfulness, and impulsivity, need for stimulation. Children with decreasing or increasing CP and CU traits were characterized by decreases and increases respectively in their levels of fearlessness and psychopathic traits. Children high on CP and low on CU traits exhibited lower levels of these dimensions. Thus, stability and change of fearlessness and psychopathic traits are associated with stability and change in CP and CU traits, making these temperamental and personality traits promising target candidates for early intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Conduct problems; Callous-unemotional traits; Early childhood; Fearlessness; Psychopathic personality dimensions
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47883 (URN)10.1007/s10578-015-0560-0 (DOI)000371606700007 ()26115696 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84933574227 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2024-01-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0590-8600

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