oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gustafsson, MargaretaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8658-3360
Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Wallin, A., Gustafsson, M., Anderzen Carlsson, A. & Lundén, M. (2019). Radiographers' experience of risks for patient safety incidents in the radiology department. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(7-8), 1125-1134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiographers' experience of risks for patient safety incidents in the radiology department
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 1125-1134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe potential risks for patient safety incidents in the radiology department from a radiographer's perspective.

BACKGROUND: A radiology department is a high-tech environment with high communication activity between different health care systems in combination with a large patient flow. Risks for patient safety incidents exist in every phase of a radiological examination. Due to the nature of the activity, a radiology department needs to have its own range of measures to prevent risks linked to radiology.

DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 17 radiographers during the period September 2015 to February 2016. The data was analyzed using conventional content analysis. This study followed the COREQ checklist criteria for the reporting of qualitative research.

RESULTS: The analysis yielded 20 different patient safety incidents that could result in the following six types of health care-associated harm: Patients could; (1) be exposed to unnecessary radiation; (2) receive an inaccurate diagnosis; (3) incur drug-induced damage; (4) suffer direct physical injury; or (5) their examination and treatment could be delayed or not carried out; or (6) their general health condition could deteriorate.

CONCLUSION: Lack of communication and knowledge, both internally and externally, can increase risks for patient safety incidents. The study describes a complex chain of activities that represent risks in the radiology department. It needs to be pointed out that it is not always the activities in the radiology department that cause the harm.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: To carry out preventive patient safety work, a comprehensive analysis of the entire care chain is required. Patient safety work should also focus on improvement of communication both internally, within the radiology department, and externally. Standardized methodological guidelines, consistent prescriptions of method from the radiologist, and a good working environment are internal success factors for patient safety at the radiology department.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Science Ltd., 2019
Keywords
Harm, Incidents, Medical Errors, Nursing, Patient Safety, Qualitative Research, Radiography, Radiology Department, Risk factors
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Nursing Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69120 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14681 (DOI)000460767400008 ()30257057 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054915952 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
Ewertsson, M., Gustafsson, M., Blomberg, K., Holmström, I. & Allvin, R. (2016). Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: a questionnaire study. New registered nurses’ use of technical skills and possibility for continued learning. In: : . Paper presented at AMEE –An international association for medical education. International Conference. Barcelona, Spain, 2016 27-31/8..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: a questionnaire study. New registered nurses’ use of technical skills and possibility for continued learning
Show others...
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54276 (URN)
Conference
AMEE –An international association for medical education. International Conference. Barcelona, Spain, 2016 27-31/8.
Available from: 2017-01-04 Created: 2017-01-04 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Isaksson, A.-K., Allvin, R., Bisholt, B., Ewertsson, M., Kullén Engström, A., . . . Gustafsson, M. (2016). Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision. Journal of Nursing Management, 24(1), 80-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim was to investigate occupational stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to the workplace and clinical group supervision.

Background: Being a newly graduated nurse is particularly stressful. What remains unclear is whether the workplace and clinical group supervision affect the stress.

Method: A cross-sectional comparative study was performed in 2012. Data were collected by means of a numerical scale measuring occupational stress, questions about workplace and clinical group supervision. One hundred and thirteen nurses who had recently graduated from three Swedish universities were included in the study.

Results: The stress was high among the newly graduated nurses but it differed significantly between workplaces, surgical departments generating the most stress. Nurses who had received clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress. The stress between workplaces remained significant also when participation in clinical group supervision was taken into account.

Conclusions: Newly graduated nurses experience great stress and need support, especially those in surgical departments. Nurses participating in clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress.

Implications for nursing management: It is important to develop strategies that help to adapt the work situation so as to give nurses the necessary support. Clinical group supervision should be considered as an option for reducing stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
clinical group supervision; newly graduated nurses; occupational stress; workplace
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36208 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12274 (DOI)000368263600021 ()25421164 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-29 Created: 2014-08-29 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Ross, A., Ohlsson, U., Blomberg, K. & Gustafsson, M. (2015). Evaluation of an intervention to individualise patient education at a nurse-led heart failure clinic: a mixed-method study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(11-12), 1594-1602
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of an intervention to individualise patient education at a nurse-led heart failure clinic: a mixed-method study
2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 11-12, p. 1594-1602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objetives: The main aim of this study was to evaluate whether addressing the written questions of heart failure patients could individualise the education and increase patient satisfaction. A further aim was to describe the learning needs of patients with newly diagnosed heart failure.

Background: Despite well-designed patient education, daily problems and self-care sometimes seem difficult to manage for the patient with heart failure. The literature suggested that nurses should include individualised educational interventions.

Design: The study had an evaluative and descriptive design.

Methods: A mixed-method approach was used. A quasi-experimental method was used to compare patients in the control group (n = 41), who received regular education at the nurse-led heart failure clinic, with patients in the intervention group (n = 44), who received regular education but also education addressing questions they had written down at home before coming to the clinic. Two instruments were used to investigate, respectively, whether the intervention caused patients to experience a greater sense of involvement in their education and greater satisfaction. The patients' questions were subjected to manifest content analysis.

Results: There was no significant difference in satisfaction with the education between the control group and the intervention group. However, the intervention group did feel more strongly that the information they received was related to their personal situation. The patients' learning needs before education were categorised as: causes and meaning of illness, control and management of the disease, impact on daily living and future health.

Conclusion: Asking heart failure patients to write down their learning needs before the education increases their chances of receiving education based on their individual needs.

Relevance to clinical practice: The method is simple and cost-effective and could be a way to improve the patient education and facilitate person-centred care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Empowerment, heart failure, nursing, patient education, person-centred care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47054 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12760 (DOI)000355331300016 ()25753064 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84929703197 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Kullén Engström, A., Ohlsson, U., Sundler, A. J. & Bisholt, B. (2015). Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses: A mixed method study. Nurse Education Today, 35(12), 1289-1294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses: A mixed method study
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1289-1294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aimwas to describe and compare the clinical teacher's role in different models of clinical practice from the perspective of student nurses.

Design and Settings: The study took place in collaboration with two Swedish universities that applied different educational models in clinical practice. Amixed method approachwas used. The quantitative part had a comparative design and the qualitative part had a descriptive design.

Participants: The study group consisted of 114 student nurses (response rate 87%). Fifty-three of them had met clinical teachers employed at the university and not participating in the daily clinical work (University Nurse Teachers, UNTs), whilst 61 had met clinical teachers dividing their time between teaching and nursing (Clinical Nurse Teachers, CNTs). Eight students participated in the qualitative part of the study.

Methods: A questionnaire including the CLES + T scale was used to ascertain the students' perception of the clinical teacher's role, complemented by interviews directed towards an enrichment of this perception.

Results: Students meeting CNTs agreedmore strongly than those meeting UNTs that the teacher had the ability to help them integrate theory and practice. Whilst spontaneous meetings between students and CNTs occurred, students mostly met UNTs in seminars. Students meeting UNTs felt alone but did appreciate having someone outside the clinical environment to provide support if they did not get along with their preceptor.

Conclusions: In the case of UNTs, it is important that they keep their knowledge of clinical issues updated and visit the clinical placement not only for seminars but also to give students emotional support. In the case of CNTs, it is important that they are members of the faculty at the university, take part in the planning of the clinical courses and are able to explain the learning goals to the students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2015
Keywords
Nursing education; Clinical education; Mixed methods; Nurse teacher; Student nurse; Triangulation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44034 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2015.03.008 (DOI)000365372700025 ()25846197 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946490890 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Ramar för verksamhetsförlagd utbildning i sjuksköterskeutbildning
Available from: 2015-04-04 Created: 2015-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Blomberg, K. & Holmefur, M. (2015). Test-retest reliability of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale. Nurse Education in Practice, 15(4), 253-257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Test-retest reliability of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale
2015 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 253-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale evaluates the student nurses' perception of the learning environment and supervision within the clinical placement. It has never been tested in a replication study. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CLES + T scale. The CLES + T scale was administered twice to a group of 42 student nurses, with a one-week interval. Test-retest reliability was determined by calculations of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) and weighted Kappa coefficients. Standard Error of Measurements (SEM) and Smallest Detectable Difference (SDD) determined the precision of individual scores. Bland-Altman plots were created for analyses of systematic differences between the test occasions. The results of the study showed that the stability over time was good to excellent (ICC 0.88 - 0.96) in the sub-dimensions “Supervisory relationship”, “Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward” and “Role of the nurse teacher”. Measurements of “Premises of nursing on the ward” and “Leadership style of the manager” had lower but still acceptable stability (ICC 0.70 - 0.75). No systematic differences occurred between the test occasions. This study supports the usefulness of the CLES + T scale as a reliable measure of the student nurses’ perception of the learning environment within the clinical placement at a hospital.

Keywords
Clinical learning environment, Clinical education, Measurement issues and assessment, Measurement error, Nursing education, Student nurses, Psychometrics, Reliability, Test-retest reliability
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43839 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2015.02.003 (DOI)000358807100001 ()25814151 (PubMedID)
Projects
Lärande i professionsutbildning
Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Ewertsson, M., Gustafsson, M., Blomberg, K., Holmström, I. K. & Allvin, R. (2015). Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: A questionnaire study. Nurse Education Today, 35(12), 1169-1174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: A questionnaire study
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1169-1174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: One comprehensive part of nursing practice is performing technical skills and handling of medical equipment. This might be challenging for new registered nurses (RNs) to do in patient-safe way.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and compare the extent to which new RNs perform various technical skills and handle medical devices in different settings, and to investigate their possibility for continued learning in this respect. A further aim was to describe their perceptions of incident reporting related to technical skills and medical devices.

Design: A cross-sectional study with descriptive and comparative design.

Participants: RNs who recently graduated from a nursing programme at three Swedish universities and had worked as a RN for up to 1year were included in the study (n=113, response rate 57%).

Method: Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire.

Results: Half of the RNs reported that they performed several of the listed tasks every day or every week, regardless of workplace. These tasks were most frequently performed in surgical departments. The majority of the participants (76%) stated a need of continued practical training. However, less than half of them (48%) had access to a training environment. Several participants (43%) had been involved in incidents related to technical skills or medical devices, which were not always reported. Nearly a third of the participants (31%) did not use the existing guidelines when performing technical skills, and reflection on performance was uncommon.

Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of shared responsibilities between nurse educators and health care employers to provide learning opportunities for new RNs in technical skills, to maintain patient safety. To increase the safety culture where nursing students and new RNs understand the importance of using evidence-based guidelines and taking a reflective approach in the performance of technical tasks is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2015
Keywords
Clinical competence, Clinical laboratory, Equipment and supplies, Incident reports, Medical devices, New registered nurses, Nursing skills, Patient safety
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47060 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2015.05.006 (DOI)000365372700007 ()26059922 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946492078 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Bisholt, B., Ohlsson, U., Engström, A. K., Sundler, A. J. & Gustafsson, M. (2014). Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings. Nurse Education in Practice, 14(3), 304-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Nursing students perform their clinical practice in different types of clinical settings. The clinical learning environment is important for students to be able to achieve desired learning outcomes. Knowledge is lacking about the learning environment in different clinical settings.

AIM: The aim was to compare the learning environment in different clinical settings from the perspective of the nursing students.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was conducted.

METHOD: Data was collected from 185 nursing students at three universities by means of a questionnaire involving the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. An open-ended question was added in order to ascertain reasons for dissatisfaction with the clinical placement.

RESULTS: The nursing students' satisfaction with the placement did not differ between clinical settings. However, those with clinical placement in hospital departments agreed more strongly that sufficient meaningful learning situations occurred and that learning situations were multi-dimensional. Some students reported that the character of the clinical setting made it difficult to achieve the learning objectives.

CONCLUSION: In the planning of the clinical placement, attention must be paid to whether the setting offers the student a meaningful learning situation where the appropriate learning outcome may be achieved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Clinical learning environment, clinical placement, nurse education research, nursing students
National Category
Nursing Learning
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35074 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2013.11.005 (DOI)000349568100015 ()24355802 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84902169054 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Ramar för verksamhetsförlagd utbildning i sjuksköterskeutbildningen
Available from: 2014-05-19 Created: 2014-05-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sundler, A. J., Björk, M., Bisholt, B., Ohlsson, U., Engström, A. K. & Gustafsson, M. (2014). Student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: a questionnaire survey. Nurse Education Today, 34(4), 661-666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: a questionnaire survey
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim was to investigate student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to how the supervision was organized.

Background: The clinical environment plays an essential part in student nurses' learning. Even though different models for supervision have been previously set forth, it has been stressed that there is a need both of further empirical studies on the role of preceptorship in undergraduate nursing education and of studies comparing different models.

Method: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was carried out with a mixed method approach. Data were collected from student nurses in the final term of the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden by means of a questionnaire.

Results: In general the students had positive experiences of the clinical learning environment with respect to pedagogical atmosphere, leadership style of the ward manager, premises of nursing, supervisory relationship, and role of the nurse preceptor and nurse teacher. However, there were significant differences in their ratings of the supervisory relationship (p < 0.001) and the pedagogical atmosphere (p 0.025) depending on how the supervision was organized. Students who had the same preceptor all the time were more satisfied with the supervisory relationship than were those who had different preceptors each day. Students' comments on the supervision confirmed the significance of the preceptor and the supervisory relationship.

Conclusion: The organization of the supervision was of significance with regard to the pedagogical atmosphere and the students' relation to preceptors. Students with the same preceptor throughout were more positive concerning the supervisory relationship and the pedagogical atmosphere. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Clinical education; Clinical learning environment; Clinical placement; Preceptors; Questionnaire; Student nurses; Supervision
National Category
Nursing Learning
Research subject
Nursing Science; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36211 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2013.06.023 (DOI)000333781600031 ()23850574 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84895100809 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-08-29 Created: 2014-08-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Bisholt, B., Engström, A. K., Ohlsson, U., Sundler, A. J. & Gustafsson, M. (2014). Swedish nursing students' experience of stress during clinical practice in relation to clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the clinical education. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23(15-16), 2264-2271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish nursing students' experience of stress during clinical practice in relation to clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the clinical education
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15-16, p. 2264-2271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe nursing students' experience of stress during clinical practice and evaluate the risk of stress in relation to the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the clinical education.

BACKGROUND: Stress during clinical practice is well documented, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning whether the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the education make a difference.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional study with evaluative design.

METHODS: Data were collected by means of a numerical rating scale for the assessment of stress and questions about the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the education. One hundred and eighty-four students who had completed their final year on the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden were included.

RESULTS: Nearly half of the students (43%) experienced high level of stress during clinical practice. Measured by decision in the tree analysis, the absolute risk of stress was 57% in students with placements in hospital departments, as compared to 13% in students with placements in other clinical settings. The risk of stress increased to 71% if the students with placement in a hospital took the national clinical final examination. Performance of practice in a hospital department overcrowded with patients was also associated with increased risk of stress. The organisation of supervision and number of students at the clinical placement had an effect on the experience of stress, but did not prove to be risk factors in the analysis.

CONCLUSIONS: The risk of stress in nursing students during their clinical practice differs depending on clinical setting characteristics. The taking of the national clinical final examination could be a source of stress, but this requires further investigation.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important that supervisors are aware that students in hospital departments overcrowded with patients are at risk of stress and may have increased need of support.

Keywords
clinical education, clinical placements, nursing education, nursing students, risk factors, stress
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35073 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12506 (DOI)000339431800020 ()24393384 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904433691 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-05-19 Created: 2014-05-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8658-3360

Search in DiVA

Show all publications