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Kerr, Margaret
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Publications (10 of 118) Show all publications
Hiatt, C., Laursen, B., Stattin, H. & Kerr, M. (2017). Best friend influence over adolescent problem behaviors: Socialized by the satisfied. Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), 46(5), 695-708
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Best friend influence over adolescent problem behaviors: Socialized by the satisfied
2017 (English)In: Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), ISSN 1537-4416, E-ISSN 1537-4424, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 695-708Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study was designed to examine best friend influence over alcohol intoxication and truancy as a function of relative perceptions of friendship satisfaction. The participants were 700 adolescents (306 boys, 394 girls) who were involved in same-sex best friendships that were stable from one academic year to the next. Participants completed self-report measures of alcohol intoxication frequency and truancy at 1-year intervals. Each member of each friendship dyad also rated his or her satisfaction with the relationship. At the outset, participants were in secondary school (approximately 13-14 years old) or high school (approximately 16-17 years old). More satisfied friends had greater influence than less satisfied friends over changes in intoxication frequency and truancy. Problem behaviors of less satisfied friends increased over time if the more satisfied friend reported relatively higher, but not relatively lower, initial levels of drinking or truancy. The results support the hypothesis that adolescent friends are not similarly influential. The power to socialize, for better and for worse, rests with the partner who has a more positive perception of the relationship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46925 (URN)10.1080/15374416.2015.1050723 (DOI)000408100100007 ()26135745 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

U.S. National Institute of Mental Health MH58116

U.S. National Science Foundation 0923745

Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2017-09-15Bibliographically approved
DeLay, D., Laursen, B., Bukowski, W. M., Kerr, M. & Stattin, H. (2016). Adolescent friend similarity on alcohol abuse as a function of participation in romantic relationships: Sometimes a new love comes between old friends. Developmental Psychology, 52(1), 117-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent friend similarity on alcohol abuse as a function of participation in romantic relationships: Sometimes a new love comes between old friends
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2016 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 117-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study tests the hypothesis that adolescents with romantic partners are less similar to their friends on rates of alcohol abuse than adolescents without romantic partners. Participants (662 girls, 574 boys) ranging in age from 12 to 19 years nominated friends and romantic partners, and completed a measure of alcohol abuse. In hierarchical linear models, friends with romantic partners were less similar on rates of alcohol abuse than friends without romantic partners, especially if they were older and less accepted. Follow-up longitudinal analyses were conducted on a subsample (266 boys, 374 girls) of adolescents who reported friendships that were stable across 2 consecutive years. Associations between friend reports of alcohol abuse declined after adolescents became involved in a romantic relationship, to the point at which they became more similar to their romantic partners than to their friends.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2016
Keywords
Adolescence; Alcohol abuse; Friendship; Homophily; Romantic relationships
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46923 (URN)10.1037/a0039882 (DOI)000367394900010 ()26595356 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84952862105 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development HD068421

U.S. National Science Foundation 0923745 0909733

Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
Amnå, E., Ekström, M., Kerr, M. & Stattin, H. (2015). Codebook: The Political Socialization Program (2015-01-26). Örebro: Örebro University: Youth & Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Codebook: The Political Socialization Program (2015-01-26)
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University: Youth & Society, 2015. p. 538
Keywords
civic engagement, political participation, political communication, development, adolescents, young adults, longitudinal
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies; Political Science; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42549 (URN)
Projects
Political Socialization and Human Agency: The Development of Civic Engagement from Adolescence to Young Adulthood
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M2008-0073
Available from: 2015-02-09 Created: 2015-02-09 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Richmond, A. D., Laursen, B., Kerr, M. & Stattin, H. (2015). Depressive symptoms anticipate changes in the frequency of alcohol intoxication among low-accepted adolescents. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 76(4), 585-593
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive symptoms anticipate changes in the frequency of alcohol intoxication among low-accepted adolescents
2015 (English)In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 585-593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: There is strong evidence that depression anticipates later drinking problems among adults. These associations have not been consistently documented during adolescence, perhaps because little attention has been given to individual differences in peer relationships, which are the primary setting for adolescent alcohol consumption. This study investigated associations between depressive affect and alcohol misuse as moderated by peer group acceptance.

Method: A community sample of 1,048 Swedish youth provided self-reports of depressive symptoms and intoxication frequency at annual intervals across the middle school years (seventh grade: M = 13.21 years old; eighth grade: M = 14.27 years old; ninth grade: M = 15.26 years old). Peer nominations provided a measure of individual acceptance.

Results: Growth curve analyses revealed differences in the extent to which initial levels of depressive symptoms predicted the slope of increase in intoxication frequency. Higher levels of depressive symptoms at the outset anticipated sharp increases in intoxication frequency from seventh to ninth grades for low-accepted youth but not for average- or high-accepted youth.

Conclusions: Poor peer relations and depressive affect are vulnerabilities that set the stage for escalating adolescent alcohol misuse. Across the middle school years, when most youth have their first experiences with alcohol, peer difficulties exacerbated the tendency of depressed youth to drink to excess.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45287 (URN)000356911200011 ()26098034 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

U.S. National Institute of Mental Health MH58116

U.S. National Science Foundation 0923745 0909733

Available from: 2015-07-23 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Dickson, D. J., Laursen, B., Stattin, H. & Kerr, M. (2015). Parental Supervision and Alcohol Abuse Among Adolescent Girls. Pediatrics, 136(4), 617-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental Supervision and Alcohol Abuse Among Adolescent Girls
2015 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 136, no 4, p. 617-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Inadequate parent supervision during the early adolescent years forecasts a host of conduct problems, including illicit alcohol consumption. Early pubertal maturation may exacerbate problems, because girls alienated from same-age peers seek the company of older, more mature youth. The current study examines overtime associations between parent autonomy granting and adolescent alcohol abuse during a developmental period when alcohol consumption becomes increasingly normative, to determine if early maturing girls are at special risk for problems arising from a lack of parent supervision.

METHODS: At annual intervals for 4 consecutive years, a community sample of 957 Swedish girls completed surveys beginning in the first year of secondary school (approximate age: 13 years) describing rates of alcohol intoxication and perceptions of parent autonomy granting. Participants also reported age at menarche.

RESULTS: Multiple-group parallel process growth curve models revealed that early pubertal maturation exacerbated the risk associated with premature autonomy granting: Alcohol intoxication rates increased 3 times faster for early maturing girls with the greatest autonomy than they did for early maturing girls with the least autonomy. Child-driven effects were also found such that higher initial levels of alcohol abuse predicted greater increases in autonomy granting as parent supervision over children engaged in illicit drinking waned.

CONCLUSIONS: Early maturing girls are at elevated risk for physical and psychological adjustment difficulties. The etiology of escalating problems with alcohol can be traced, in part, to a relative absence of parent supervision during a time when peer interactions assume special significance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American academic Pediatrics, 2015
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46447 (URN)10.1542/peds.2015-1258 (DOI)000362944300046 ()26391935 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84942885559 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilNIH (National Institute of Health)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development HD33006

US National Science Foundation 0909733

Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Mörtberg, E., Tillfors, M., Van Zalk, N. & Kerr, M. (2014). An atypical anxious-impulsive pattern of social anxiety disorder in an adult clinical population. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 55(4), 350-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An atypical anxious-impulsive pattern of social anxiety disorder in an adult clinical population
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 350-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An atypical subgroup of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) with impulsive rather than inhibited traits has recently been reported. The current study examined whether such an atypical subgroup could be identified in a clinical population of 84 adults with SAD. The temperament dimensions harm avoidance and novelty seeking of the Temperament and Character Inventory, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale were used in cluster analyses. The identified clusters were compared on depressive symptoms, the character dimension self-directedness, and treatment outcome. Among the six identified clusters, 24% of the sample had atypical characteristics, demonstrating mainly generalized SAD in combination with coexisting traits of inhibition and impulsivity. As additional signs of severity, this group showed low self-directedness and high levels of depressive symptoms. We also identified a typically inhibited subgroup comprising generalized SAD with high levels of harm avoidance and low levels of novelty seeking, with a similar clinical severity as the atypical subgroup. Thus, higher levels of harm avoidance and social anxiety in combination with higher or lower levels of novelty seeking and low self-directedness seem to contribute to a more severe clinical picture. Post hoc examination of the treatment outcome in these subgroups showed that only 20 to 30% achieved clinically significant change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
Social anxiety disorder; anxious-impulsive subgroup; depressive symptoms; personality
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33477 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12117 (DOI)000339617500009 ()24716675 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904120137 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-01-30 Created: 2014-01-30 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Mörtberg, E., Tillfors, M., van Zalk, N. & Kerr, M. (2014). An atypical anxious-impulsive pattern of social anxiety disorder in an adult clinical population. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 55(4), 350-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An atypical anxious-impulsive pattern of social anxiety disorder in an adult clinical population
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 350-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An atypical subgroup of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) with impulsive rather than inhibited traits has recently been reported. The current study examined whether such an atypical subgroup could be identified in a clinical population of 84 adults with SAD. The temperament dimensions harm avoidance and novelty seeking of the Temperament and Character Inventory, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale were used in cluster analyses. The identified clusters were compared on depressive symptoms, the character dimension self-directedness, and treatment outcome. Among the six identified clusters, 24% of the sample had atypical characteristics, demonstrating mainly generalized SAD in combination with coexisting traits of inhibition and impulsivity. As additional signs of severity, this group showed low self-directedness and high levels of depressive symptoms. We also identified a typically inhibited subgroup comprising generalized SAD with high levels of harm avoidance and low levels of novelty seeking, with a similar clinical severity as the atypical subgroup. Thus, higher levels of harm avoidance and social anxiety in combination with higher or lower levels of novelty seeking and low self-directedness seem to contribute to a more severe clinical picture. Post hoc examination of the treatment outcome in these subgroups showed that only 20 to 30% achieved clinically significant change.

Keywords
Social anxiety disorder, anxious-impulsive subgroup, depressive symptoms, personality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36162 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12117 (DOI)000339617500009 ()
Available from: 2014-09-03 Created: 2014-08-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
van Zalk, M. H. & Kerr, M. (2014). Developmental trajectories of prejudice and tolerance toward immigrants from early to late adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 43(10), 1658-1671
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental trajectories of prejudice and tolerance toward immigrants from early to late adolescence
2014 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 1658-1671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescence is an important period for the development of relationships between immigrants and non-immigrants, yet little is known about how problematic personality traits affect adolescents' relationships with and attitudes toward immigrants. This work identified the roles of intergroup relationships and one dimension of problematic personality traits, namely callous-unemotional traits, in the development of adolescents' tolerance and prejudice. Three annual measurements of a large community sample (N = 1,542) of non-immigrant adolescents (M (age) = 15.31 at first measurement; 50.2 % girls) were used to show that tolerance and prejudice toward immigrants represent two dimensions with distinct developmental trajectories from early to late adolescence. Callous-unemotional traits predicted fewer decreases in prejudice toward immigrants, yet were not directly associated with tolerance. Intergroup friendships predicted stronger increases in tolerance, which, in turn, predicted decreases in prejudice toward immigrants. Thus, tolerance and prejudice toward immigrants seem to be differentially influenced by social experiences and problematic personality traits.

Keywords
Prejudice, Tolerance, Intergroup friendships, Callous-unemotional traits
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37867 (URN)10.1007/s10964-014-0164-1 (DOI)000342156500005 ()2-s2.0-84906036045 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-10Bibliographically approved
Van Zalk, M. H., Van Zalk, N., Kerr, M. & Stattin, H. (2014). Influences Between Online-Exclusive, Conjoint and Offline-Exclusive Friendship Networks: The Moderating Role of Shyness. European Journal of Personality, 28(2), 134-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influences Between Online-Exclusive, Conjoint and Offline-Exclusive Friendship Networks: The Moderating Role of Shyness
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Personality, ISSN 0890-2070, E-ISSN 1099-0984, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 134-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prior research has indicated that shy adolescents are more motivated to form friendships online than to form friendships offline. Little is known about whether having friendships found exclusively online may impact self-esteem and forming offline friendships for these adolescents. This study therefore aimed to provide insight into the moderating role of shyness in the longitudinal interplay between friendships in online and offline contexts in early adolescence. Adolescents and their friends (193 girls, 196 boys; M-age = 13.29) were followed with three consecutive measurements with intervals of eight months. Results showed that particularly for shy adolescents, having friends exclusively online predicted increases in self-esteem. Self-esteem, in turn, was found to predict forming more friendships found both offline and online and forming more friendships found exclusively offline. Thus, findings supported the social compensation perspective that shy adolescents may benefit from having friends exclusively online, as these friendships may increase self-esteem, thereby facilitating the formation of friendships found partially and completely offline. Copyright (c) 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
friendships, online relationships, shyness, self-esteem
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34998 (URN)10.1002/per.1895 (DOI)000334033500003 ()
Available from: 2014-05-09 Created: 2014-05-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Darling, N., Tilton-Weaver, L. & Kerr, M. (2014). Monitoring and routine disclosure: difference within and across families. In: L. Tilton-Weaver (Chair), A second look: Understanding parental monitoring and disclosure across time and contexts.  : . Paper presented at 14th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), Cesme, Turkey, September 3-6, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring and routine disclosure: difference within and across families
2014 (English)In: L. Tilton-Weaver (Chair), A second look: Understanding parental monitoring and disclosure across time and contexts.  , 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-40258 (URN)
Conference
14th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), Cesme, Turkey, September 3-6, 2014
Available from: 2015-01-07 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
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