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Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Björkman, L., Hagberg, J., Schollin, J. & Ohlin, A. (2017). Can the use of isopropanol impregnated caps cause alcohol leakage into intravenous lines?. In: : . Paper presented at Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2017 Meeting, San Francisco, CA, USA, May 6-9, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can the use of isopropanol impregnated caps cause alcohol leakage into intravenous lines?
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67263 (URN)
Conference
Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2017 Meeting, San Francisco, CA, USA, May 6-9, 2017
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Björkman, L. & Ohlin, A. (2015). Scrubbing the hub of intravenous catheters with an alcohol wipe for 15 sec reduced neonatal sepsis. Acta Paediatrica, 104(3), 232-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scrubbing the hub of intravenous catheters with an alcohol wipe for 15 sec reduced neonatal sepsis
2015 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 232-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether scrubbing the hub of intravenous catheters with an alcohol wipe for 15 sec could reduce the incidence of neonatal sepsis in a level-three neonatal intensive care unit.

Methods: We studied the incidence of neonatal sepsis caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) for 16.5 months before the initiative was launched on May 15, 2012 and then for a further 8.5 months after it was introduced. The hub routine was applied to all intravenous catheters.

Results: During the control period before the initiative was launched, there were nine cases of CoNS sepsis compared with no cases after it was introduced, resulting in a decrease in sepsis incidence from 1.5% to 0% with a risk reduction of 1.5% (0.53-2.58%) (p = 0.06). In the preterm infant population, the incidence of sepsis decreased from 3.6% to 0% (1.1-6.0%) (p = 0.11).

Conclusion: Scrubbing the hub of intravenous catheters with an alcohol wipe for 15 sec seemed to be an efficient way of preventing sepsis caused by CoNS in newborn infants. However, the evidence for the benefits will remain weak until a large randomised trial has been completed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Infection, Intravenous catheters, Neonatal sepsis, Prevention
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43932 (URN)10.1111/apa.12866 (DOI)000350062400012 ()25399485 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84923181512 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ohlin, A., Björkman, L., Serenius, F., Schollin, J. & Källén, K. (2015). Sepsis as a risk factor for neonatal morbidity in extremely preterm infants. Acta Paediatrica, 104(11), 1070-1076
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sepsis as a risk factor for neonatal morbidity in extremely preterm infants
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2015 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 11, p. 1070-1076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study evaluated sepsis as a risk factor for neonatal morbidities and investigated the association between specific pathogens and neonatal morbidities.

Methods: This was a nationwide Swedish prospective cohort study, consisting of the 497 extremely premature children, who were born before 27weeks of gestation between 2004 and 2007 and survived their first year of life. Neonatal sepsis was evaluated as a risk factor for neonatal morbidity using multiple logistic linear regression analyses.

Results: We found that 326 (66%) of the infants had at least one sepsis episode and coagulase-negative staphylococci was the most common pathogen. Definite sepsis, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.6, was associated with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, but not clinical sepsis (OR 1.1). Definite sepsis was also associated with a prolonged hospital stay (OR 1.6). Sepsis was not significantly associated with a higher risk of retinopathy of prematurity or intraventricular haemorrhage.

Conclusion: Extremely preterm infants face a great risk of acquiring neonatal sepsis, with coagulase-negative staphylococci being the most common pathogen in this population. Definite sepsis seemed to be a risk factor for severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged hospital stay, but the associations were weaker than in previous studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Morbidity, Neonatal, Prematurity, Risk factor, Sepsis
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46694 (URN)10.1111/apa.13104 (DOI)000363866200018 ()26118325 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84945493792 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2006-3858
Note

Funding Agencies:

Lilla Barnets Fond

Evy and Gunnar Sandbergs Foundation

Birgit and Håkan Ohlssons Foundation

Available from: 2015-11-23 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0958-7341

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