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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Nystrand, C., Hultkrantz, L., Vimefall, E. & Feldman, I. (2020). Economic Return on Investment of Parent Training Programmes for the Prevention of Child Externalising Behaviour Problems. Administration and Policy in Mental Health, 47(2), 300-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Economic Return on Investment of Parent Training Programmes for the Prevention of Child Externalising Behaviour Problems
2020 (English)In: Administration and Policy in Mental Health, ISSN 0894-587X, E-ISSN 1573-3289, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 300-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Economic models to inform decision-making are gaining popularity, especially for preventive interventions. However, there are few estimates of the long-term returns to parenting interventions used to prevent mental health problems in children. Using data from a randomised controlled trial evaluating five indicated parenting interventions for parents of children aged 5-12, we modeled the economic returns resulting from reduced costs in the health care and education sector, and increased long-term productivity in a Swedish setting. Analyses done on the original trial population, and on various sized local community populations indicated positive benefit-cost ratios. Even smaller local authorities would financially break-even, thus interventions were of good value-for-money. Benefit-cost analyses of such interventions may improve the basis for resource allocation within local decision-making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2020
Keywords
Benefit–cost analysis, Mental health, Parenting
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77460 (URN)10.1007/s10488-019-00984-5 (DOI)000491455800001 ()31630323 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-10,128
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
Vimefall, E., Persson, M., Sara, O. & Hultkrantz, L. (2019). Is Prevention of Suicides Less important than Prevention of Other Fatalities?: A comparison of the Value of Statisitcal Life for Suicide vs Trafic Fatality Reduction. In: Massimo Moscarelli (Ed.), Fourteenth Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry ‘The Value of Mental Health Services’ Venice - March 29-31, 2019: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at 14th Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry - The Value of Mental Health Services, Venice, Italy, March 29-31, 2019 (pp. 35-35). John Wiley & Sons, 22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Prevention of Suicides Less important than Prevention of Other Fatalities?: A comparison of the Value of Statisitcal Life for Suicide vs Trafic Fatality Reduction
2019 (English)In: Fourteenth Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry ‘The Value of Mental Health Services’ Venice - March 29-31, 2019: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Massimo Moscarelli, John Wiley & Sons, 2019, Vol. 22, p. 35-35Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Series
The Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X
Keywords
Suicide prevention, Willingness to pay, Value of Statistical life
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76942 (URN)
Conference
14th Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry - The Value of Mental Health Services, Venice, Italy, March 29-31, 2019
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-10128
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
Andrén, D. & Vimefall, E. (2019). Well-being and the Willingness to Pay for an Intervention Aimed to Decrease Depression. In: Fourteenth Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry ‘The Value of Mental Health Services’ Venice - March 29-31, 2019: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at Fourteenth Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry - The Value of Mental Health Services, Venice, Italy, March 29-31, 2019. John Wiley & Sons, 22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Well-being and the Willingness to Pay for an Intervention Aimed to Decrease Depression
2019 (English)In: Fourteenth Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry ‘The Value of Mental Health Services’ Venice - March 29-31, 2019: Book of Abstracts, John Wiley & Sons, 2019, Vol. 22Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Series
The Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X
Keywords
Well-being, Willingness to Pay, Intervention, Depression
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76823 (URN)
Conference
Fourteenth Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry - The Value of Mental Health Services, Venice, Italy, March 29-31, 2019
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
Nystrand, C., Hultkrantz, L., Vimefall, E., Sampaio, F. & Feldman, I. (2018). Indicated Parenting Interventions and Long Term Outcomes: A Health Economic Modeling Study. In: : . Paper presented at ISPOR 8th Asia-Pacific Conference, Tokyo, Japan, September 8-11, 2018 (pp. S76-S76). Elsevier, 21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicated Parenting Interventions and Long Term Outcomes: A Health Economic Modeling Study
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Economic evaluations of early interventions for children are augmenting in numbers and a larger focus is put on the longer-term economic returns. However, little is known about the labour market returns from preventive parenting programs. This study estimates the benefits and costs of five parenting interventions: Comet, Connect, the Incredible Years (IY), Cope and bibliotherapy, compared to a waitlist control, for the prevention of persistent externalizing behavior problems in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Series
Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70400 (URN)10.1016/j.jval.2018.07.571 (DOI)000458697200419 ()
Conference
ISPOR 8th Asia-Pacific Conference, Tokyo, Japan, September 8-11, 2018
Note

Camilla Nystrand presenterade abstractet på konferensen.

Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Vimefall, E., Hultkrantz, L., Persson, M. & Olofsson, S. (2018). Willingness To Pay for Depression Prevention. In: : . Paper presented at Sjunde nationella hälsoekonomiska konferensen (SHEA), Lund, Sweden, March 14-15, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Willingness To Pay for Depression Prevention
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66688 (URN)
Conference
Sjunde nationella hälsoekonomiska konferensen (SHEA), Lund, Sweden, March 14-15, 2018
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2018-04-20Bibliographically approved
Vimefall, E. (2018). Willingness to pay for depression prevention. In: : . Paper presented at 12th European Conference on Health Economics, EuHEA Conference 2018, Maastricht, The Netherlands, July 11-14, 2018. Örebro
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Willingness to pay for depression prevention
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: , 2018
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70033 (URN)
Conference
12th European Conference on Health Economics, EuHEA Conference 2018, Maastricht, The Netherlands, July 11-14, 2018
Projects
Analys av kausala långsiktiga samhällsekonomiska effekter av prevention och tidiga insatser för barn och ung Om projektet
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2014-10128
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved
Vimefall, E. (2018). Willingness To Pay for Suicidal Prevention. In: : . Paper presented at Sjunde nationella hälsoekonomiska konferensen (SHEA), Lund, Sweden, March 14-15, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Willingness To Pay for Suicidal Prevention
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66687 (URN)
Conference
Sjunde nationella hälsoekonomiska konferensen (SHEA), Lund, Sweden, March 14-15, 2018
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2018-04-20Bibliographically approved
Vimefall, E., Hultkrantz, L., Olofsson, S. & Persson, M. (2018). Willingness to pay for suicidal prevention. In: : . Paper presented at 12th European Conference on Health Economics, EuHEA Conference 2018, Maastricht, The Netherlands, July 11-14, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Willingness to pay for suicidal prevention
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: In 1997 the Swedish Parliament decided on a “vision zero” long-term target for reduction of fatalities and severe injuries caused by traffic accidents. In 2008 a similar zero vision was adopted for suicides. While the former decision has been very successful, resulted in a slimming of the number of traffic fatalities by close to a half percentages, the number of suicides has been more or less constant since the latter decision was made. A possible explanation could be that the general public, and therefore also the many people that need to be involved to accomplish a broad and ambitious target of this kind, give less priority to the reduction of death that is in some sense caused by voluntary action than death brought about by an accident. The objective of this study is to compare the valuation of statistical life (VSL) of a representative sample of Swedish adult residents in traffic accident and suicide prevention contexts.

Method: We make within-sample comparisons of responses to a pair of consecutive contingent-valuation WTP questions to a web panel of 800 individuals in the age of 18-80. The respondent are asked to state their WTP for interventions that are expected to save 100 (200) lives by prevention of traffic accidents or suicides, respectively. Respondents are also asked whether they think it is more important to reduce the number of deaths due to traffic accidents or due to suicides.

Results: 68 percent state that they think it is equally important to save lives by prevention of suicides as by traffic accidents. For 18 percent suicide prevention is more important and for 13 percent reduction of traffic safety is more important. The same picture emerges from the WTP responses. 35 percent state equal WTP values and the differences between the average VSL are not statistically significant (preliminary results).

Discussion: This finding indicates that the same VSL should be used in both areas, implying that funds for prevention of fatalities should be directed to the area with the lowest cost per saved life. To our knowledge the only previous studies on WTP for suicide prevention are Sueki (2015, 2016) that reported a lower average WTP to reduce mortality risk from suicide than from reducing mortality from other causes. However, these studies were framed within a private good context, which is problematic in the specific case of suicide since the respondent has to think of herself as a current “planner” restricting herself future “doer”. In our study, we therefore frame both kind of prevention measures as public goods, which avoids this cognitive task and also can be related to quite commonly made economic trade-offs in budget planning by state and local governments, traffic administrations, hospital boards, etc.

National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70034 (URN)
Conference
12th European Conference on Health Economics, EuHEA Conference 2018, Maastricht, The Netherlands, July 11-14, 2018
Projects
Analys av kausala långsiktiga samhällsekonomiska effekter av prevention och tidiga insatser för barn och ung
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2014-10128
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved
Hultkrantz, L., Karpaty, P. & Vimefall, E. (2017). Education-earnings linkage for assessing societal benefits of interventions for children and youth in Sweden. Psychosocial Intervention, 26(3), 171-179
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education-earnings linkage for assessing societal benefits of interventions for children and youth in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Psychosocial Intervention, ISSN 1132-0559, E-ISSN 2173-4712, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Some long-term societal benefits of early psychosocial interventions supporting children and youth at various developmental risks can be estimated with school results as a mediatory. In this paper we develop causal education-earnings links for educational achievement thresholds at the end of the nine-year compulsory school (CS) and the three-year upper secondary school (USS) in Sweden. Gross earnings are calculated with age profiles estimated on micro-level register data for the whole population. We also estimate the indirect costs of education (forgone earnings) with this data and find that they can be ignored. For the base case, we calculate the expected net present value of meeting minimum requirements for transition from CS to a national USS-program to €112,000 (SEK 1.1 million) and for graduation from such a program to €163,000 (SEK 1.6 million).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Child development; Cost-benefit; Program evaluation, Desarrollo infantil; Coste-beneficio; Evaluación del programa
National Category
Economics Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59114 (URN)10.1016/j.psi.2017.06.001 (DOI)000428615700006 ()2-s2.0-85026541877 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
Hultkrantz, L. & Vimefall, E. (2017). Social Investment Funds in Sweden: Status and Design Issues. Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, 21(3), 85-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Investment Funds in Sweden: Status and Design Issues
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2001-7405, E-ISSN 2001-7413, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 85-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Long-term investments in individual and social human capital such as preschool, school, family support, early-intervention for youth at risk and other programmes that are part of the welfare services provided by local government in Sweden are generally managed with one-year-ahead budget planning. In the light of criticism that the resulting resource allocation is biased due to short-sightedness, silo mentality and risk aversion, in recent years more than a fifth of Swedish municipalities have established “social investment funds” for promoting investment and innovation views on such measures. This article provides a background on the motives and current status of these funds at the national level and describes in more detail the design and project funding in two cases. Two critical design issues are discussed; whether investment returns should be paid back to the fund and whether assessment should be made of societal benefits other than costs avoided.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: School of Public Administration, University of Gothenburg, 2017
Keywords
Social investments; Investing in children; Cost-benefit analysis; Social impact bonds; Municipalities
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54917 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR2014:10128
Available from: 2017-01-24 Created: 2017-01-24 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9571-2315

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