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Ranjbar, P., Stranneby, D. & Borg, E. (2018). Hudens multivibratoriska diskriminationsförmåga för kommunikation med Braille. In: : . Paper presented at TeMa Hörsel 2018, Örebro, Sweden, 13-15 March, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hudens multivibratoriska diskriminationsförmåga för kommunikation med Braille
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Medical Engineering Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73209 (URN)
Conference
TeMa Hörsel 2018, Örebro, Sweden, 13-15 March, 2018
Available from: 2019-03-18 Created: 2019-03-18 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Ranjbar, P., Stranneby, D. & Borg, E. (2018). Ready-Ride: A tactile communications aid to improve the mobility of persons with deafblindness in a riding arena. International Journal of Engineering Technology and Scientific Innovation, 3(1), 56-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ready-Ride: A tactile communications aid to improve the mobility of persons with deafblindness in a riding arena
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Engineering Technology and Scientific Innovation, ISSN 2456-1851, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Persons with severe visual impairment (VI), blindness (B) and deafblindness (DB) have difficulties in mobility and thereby poor leisure time. Activities as horseback riding become difficult especially for persons with DB who communicate with an assistant/instructor via tactile sign language and need to stop and get information/feedback.

Ready-Ride, a tactile communications system can improve the mobility of the persons with B and DB by making distance communication possible. It consists of transmitter with four buttons which communicates via Bluetooth with a receiver connected to four vibrators via cables. The button(s) are used to activate the specific vibrator(s). The messages can consist of simple "right" or "left" or more complex codes for any needed instruction.

Ready-Ride has been evaluated in the riding arena by persons with B and DB who consider it as mobile, easy to use and no need for long introduction or installation of any software/hardware. The vibrations are intuitive, easy to detect and distinguish. The system gives the rider information tactually without disturbing other persons or horses nearby. Using Ready-Ride they got more time to ride and the quality was increased since they could communicate while riding and get immediate feedback directly.

One of the riders with DB has been using the system during a long period, in average one lesson a week and participated in different competitions with good results. She says that the use of Ready- Ride is crucial for continued riding, "Ready-Ride is a MUST BEE".

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IJETSI, 2018
Keywords
Blind, Deafblind, Riding, Riding arena, Tactile aid, Vibration
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69956 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
Ranjbar, P., Stranneby, D. & Borg, E. (2018). Ready-Ride, Ready-Move and VibroBraille Three Tactile Aids to Improve the Mobility of Persons with Deafness, Blindness or Deafblindness. In: : . Paper presented at European Congress of Adapted Physical Activity (EUCAPA), Worcester, England, 3-5 July, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ready-Ride, Ready-Move and VibroBraille Three Tactile Aids to Improve the Mobility of Persons with Deafness, Blindness or Deafblindness
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Medical Engineering Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73210 (URN)
Conference
European Congress of Adapted Physical Activity (EUCAPA), Worcester, England, 3-5 July, 2018
Available from: 2019-03-18 Created: 2019-03-18 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Ranjbar, P., Stranneby, D., Borg, E. & Akner-Koler, C. (2017). Haptic technical aids Distime, Monitor, Good vibrations, Ready-Ride and VibroBraille for improvement of Time perception, Environmental perception, music perception, mobility and communication for persons with deafblindness: Tactile aids. In: Tactile aids: . Paper presented at The 9th DbI European conference on Deafblindness in Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark, September 5-8, 2017. Ahlborg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haptic technical aids Distime, Monitor, Good vibrations, Ready-Ride and VibroBraille for improvement of Time perception, Environmental perception, music perception, mobility and communication for persons with deafblindness: Tactile aids
2017 (English)In: Tactile aids, Ahlborg, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There are approx. 1300 people with deafblindnes (DB) in Sweden where about 100 of them are with complete deafness (D) and blindness (B). The number will reach about 30000 if we also include people older than 65 with severe visual impairment (VI) and hearing impairment (HI) and several million worldwide.  Difficulties in time perception, environmental perception, music perception, mobility, social participation and communication are examples of their frequent problems. Five haptic technical aids are developed to reduce these problems. Distime is an application in a smart phone to inform the user about the planned activities by choosing different information channel depending on the sense that works and her/his ability. The activities can be presented as sound or vibrations for users with B; as images, movies and also as vibrations for those with D and vibrations for those with DB. Monitor informs users with D and DB about ongoing events with the aim to increase their environmental perception. Using an specific algorithm for environmental sounds, it converts the audible sounds produced by events to sensible vibrations which can be sensed and interpreted as events. Good Vibrations uses an specific algorithm for music and converts the audible music to vibrations which can be felt with the aim to increase music perception for users with severe HI, D/DB as well as for users with normal hearing who want extra enhanced experience of the music. Ready-Ride is a positioning and communication aid to improve the mobility of riders with severe VI, B or DB. It is used for distance communication between a trainer and a rider with VI where the trainer can send information about the rider’s position give commands or feedback about the riding. VibroBraille informs users with B/DB about the short notifications received from different applications in her/his cell phone. It converts the text to its corresponding Braille pattern where the active points are vibrating.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ahlborg: , 2017
National Category
Engineering and Technology Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Medical Disability Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62747 (URN)
Conference
The 9th DbI European conference on Deafblindness in Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark, September 5-8, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Ranjbar, P., Stranneby, D., Akner Koler, C. & Borg, E. (2017). Identification of vibrotactile morse code on abdomen and wrist. International Journal of Engineering, Technology and Scientific Innovation, 1(4), 351-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of vibrotactile morse code on abdomen and wrist
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Engineering, Technology and Scientific Innovation, ISSN 2456-1851, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 351-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Morse code has been used as a communications system at a distance to transmit text through tone or light pulses. This comparative study aims to test and evaluate the vibrotactile identification of Morse coded signals communicating instructions for movement. The pulses were presented on abdomen and wrist among 14 males (40-85 yr) experienced in acoustic Morse code and the rate of pulses was 12 words per minute using a Vibration Motor mounted in a plastic holder. There identification results were statistically significantly better on wrist compared to abdomen. Words were identified significantly better on the wrist as compared to abdomen but the identification results of the letters were equally good in both placements. There was a negative correlation between age and the pooled identification results tested on wrist PCC r=-0.45 (p<0.02). The participants rank ordered the wrist, over the abdomen, as the best place for positioning the vibrator. The results support haptic/tactile interaction research in positioning and communication system. Our future plans are to apply the results to the project "Ready Ride" for instructions for horseback riding for people with deafblindness as well as activity and movement for elderly people with impaired vision and hearing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IJETSI, 2017
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62752 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Akner-Koler, C. & Ranjbar, P. (2016). Integrating Sensitizing Labs in an Educational Design Process for Haptic Interaction. FORMakademisk, 9(2), 1-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating Sensitizing Labs in an Educational Design Process for Haptic Interaction
2016 (English)In: FORMakademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, E-ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New design methods for educating designers are needed to adapt the attributes of haptic interaction to fit the embodied experience of the users. This paper presents educationally framed aesthetic sensitizing labs: 1) a material-lab exploring the tactile and haptic structures of materials, 2) a vibrotactile-lab exploring actuators directly on the body and 3) a combined materials- and vibrotactile-lab embedded in materials. These labs were integrated in a design course that supports a non-linear design process for embodied explorative and experimental activities that feed into an emerging gestalt. A co-design process was developed in collaboration with researchers and users who developed positioning and communications systems for people with deafblindness. Conclusion: the labs helped to discern attributes of haptic interactions which supported designing scenarios and prototypes showing novel ways to understand and shape haptic interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Formakademisk, 2016
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Education; Art History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62751 (URN)10.7577/formakademisk.1269 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Ekström, S. R. & Ranjbar, P. (2015). Effects of sounds of locomotion on speech perception. Noise & Health, 17(77), 227-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of sounds of locomotion on speech perception
2015 (English)In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 17, no 77, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human locomotion typically creates noise, a possible consequence of which is the masking of sound signals originating in the surroundings. When walking side by side, people often subconsciously synchronize their steps. The neurophysiological and evolutionary background of this behavior is unclear. The present study investigated the potential of sound created by walking to mask perception of speech and compared the masking produced by walking in step with that produced by unsynchronized walking. The masking sound (footsteps on gravel) and the target sound (speech) were presented through the same speaker to 15 normal-hearing subjects. The original recorded walking sound was modified to mimic the sound of two individuals walking in pace or walking out of synchrony. The participants were instructed to adjust the sound level of the target sound until they could just comprehend the speech signal ("just follow conversation" or JFC level) when presented simultaneously with synchronized or unsynchronized walking sound at 40 dBA, 50 dBA, 60 dBA, or 70 dBA. Synchronized walking sounds produced slightly less masking of speech than did unsynchronized sound. The median JFC threshold in the synchronized condition was 38.5 dBA, while the corresponding value for the unsynchronized condition was 41.2 dBA. Combined results at all sound pressure levels showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for synchronized footsteps; the median difference was 2.7 dB and the mean difference was 1.2 dB [P < 0.001, repeated-measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA)]. The difference was significant for masker levels of 50 dBA and 60 dBA, but not for 40 dBA or 70 dBA. This study provides evidence that synchronized walking may reduce the masking potential of footsteps.

Keywords
Gait, hearing, just follow conversation (JFC), masking, sounds of locomotion, speech
National Category
Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45630 (URN)10.4103/1463-1741.160711 (DOI)000358433800007 ()26168953 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84937862373 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro County Council

Cardiology Clinic of OUH

Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-24 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Ranjbar, P., Stranneby, D., Akner-Koler, C. & Borg, E. (2014). Haptic Technical Aids for EnvironmentalPerception, Time Perception and Mobility (in a Riding Arena) for Persons with Deafblindness. In: HAPTICS: NEUROSCIENCE, DEVICES, MODELING, AND APPLICATIONS, PT II: . Paper presented at 9th International Conference on Haptics - Neuroscience, Devices, Modeling and Applications (EuroHaptics), Versailles, France, June 24-27, 2014. (pp. 488-490). Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 8619
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haptic Technical Aids for EnvironmentalPerception, Time Perception and Mobility (in a Riding Arena) for Persons with Deafblindness
2014 (English)In: HAPTICS: NEUROSCIENCE, DEVICES, MODELING, AND APPLICATIONS, PT II, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, Vol. 8619, p. 488-490Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This demonstration presents three vibrotactile aids to support personswith deafblindness. One aid, Monitor, consists of a microphone that detectssounds from events which are then processed as a signal that is adapted to thesensitivity range of the skin. The signal is sent as vibrations to the user withdeafblindness, who can interpret the pattern of the vibrations in order to identifythe type and position of the event/source that produced the sounds. Another aid,Distime, uses a smart phone app that informs the user with cognitive impairmentand deafblindness about a planned activity through; audio, visual or tactileinteraction that is adapted to the abilities of each individual. The last aid, Ready-ride, uses two smart phones and up to 11 vibrators that help the horse back riderwith deafblindness to communicate with the instructor from a distance viavibrators placed on different parts of the riders body e.g. wrist, thigh, back, ankle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743
Keywords
Haptic; Vibrotactile; Deafness; Blindness; Horse back riding; sound
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Research subject
Electrical Engineering; Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-40057 (URN)000345644600079 ()978-3-662-44196-1 (ISBN)
Conference
9th International Conference on Haptics - Neuroscience, Devices, Modeling and Applications (EuroHaptics), Versailles, France, June 24-27, 2014.
Available from: 2014-12-29 Created: 2014-12-29 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Ranjbar, P., Stranneby, D., Akner-Koler, C. & Borg, E. (2014). Haptic technical aids for improvement of Time perception, Environmental perception and Mobility (in a riding arena) and Music perception for persons with deafblindness. In: : . Paper presented at NAS International Conference on Audiology 2014, Turku, Finland, 1-3 September, 2014. Turku
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haptic technical aids for improvement of Time perception, Environmental perception and Mobility (in a riding arena) and Music perception for persons with deafblindness
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Persons with deafblindness have frequently difficulties in e.g. environmental perception, spatial awareness, time perception, social participation and music experience. To experience independence, participation and control, adequate processing of sensory information is important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turku: , 2014
National Category
Engineering and Technology Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Medical Disability Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62748 (URN)
Conference
NAS International Conference on Audiology 2014, Turku, Finland, 1-3 September, 2014
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Ranjbar, P. (2014). Signal Processing Methods for Improvement of Environmental Perception of Persons with Deafblindness. Advanced Materials Research, 902, 398-404
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Signal Processing Methods for Improvement of Environmental Perception of Persons with Deafblindness
2014 (English)In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 902, p. 398-404Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental perception is a functional area that is severely limited in persons with  deafblindness (DB) who belong a category of people with severe disabilities. Monitor is a vibratory aid developed with the aim to improve environmental perception of persons with DB. The aid consists of a mobile phone with an application connected to a microphone and vibrator. Monitor picks up the sounds produced by events by microphone, processes the sound using an algorithm programmed as an application in the mobile phone and then presents the signal via the vibrator to the persons with DB to be sensed and interpreted. In previous laboratory studies, four algorithms (AM, AMMC, TR, and TRHA) were developed based on modulating, and transposing principles.

The algorithms were tested by persons with normal hearing/hearing impairment and selected as good candidates to improve vibratory identification of environmental sounds. In this on-going the algorithms are tested by 13 persons with congenital D and five persons with DB using Monitor in a realistic environment, living room, kitchen or office. Forty five recorded environmental sounds were used as test stimuli.

The subjects tested the algorithms two times, Test and Retest each including a test session

initiated by a training session. The four algorithms were tested in four days at Test and four days at Retest in total eight test days. Each test day began with a training session where a sound was presented as vibrations to be sensed by the person with the aim to remember its pattern and identity.

The 45 sounds were grouped in four groups where an specific algorithm was chosen to process an specific sound group in a specific day. At the test session a sound was presented and the person was given 5 randomly chosen sound alternatives to choose the one as represented sound. The algorithms were different for different sound groups during four different test days so all algorithms were used to process all sounds. The algorithms were tested a second time, Retest, in same way as in Test.

The mean value of identification of environmental sounds varied between 74.6% and 84.0% at Test and between 86.9% and 90.4% at Retest. The identification results at Retest were

significantly improved (p<0.01) for all algorithms after a relatively short time of training indicating a good learning effect. At Test the algorithm AM was significantly better than the algorithms AMMC and TRHA (p< 0.01) and the algorithm TR was better than TRHA (p<0.01).

The algorithms AM, AMMC, and TR were selected as good candidates to be implemented in the Monitor to improve environmental perception.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Switzerland: Trans Tech Publications, 2014
Keywords
Haptic; Vibrotactile; Signal processing; Deafblindness; Environmental perception; Deaf;
National Category
Natural Sciences Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Disability Science; Electronics; Computer Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34441 (URN)10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.902.398 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-03-25 Created: 2014-03-25 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4130-7909

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