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Månsson, E. (2019). Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus epidermidis in prosthetic joint infections. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus epidermidis in prosthetic joint infections
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2019
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76142 (URN)
Public defence
2019-12-06, Örebro universitet, Campus USÖ, hörsal C1, Södra Grev Rosengatan 32, Örebro, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Månsson, E., Sahdo, B., Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å., Särndahl, E. & Söderquist, B. (2018). Lower activation of caspase-1 by Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections compared to commensals. Journal of bone and joint infection, 3(1), 10-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lower activation of caspase-1 by Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections compared to commensals
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2018 (English)In: Journal of bone and joint infection, ISSN 2206-3552, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 10-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nosocomial sequence types of Staphylococcus epidermidis dominate in prosthetic joint infections. We examined caspase-1 activation in human neutrophils after incubation with Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections and normal skin flora. Active caspase-1 was lower after incubation with isolates from prosthetic joint infections than after incubation with commensal isolates. Both host and isolate dependent differences in active caspase-1 were noted. Our results indicate that there might be a host-dependent incapacity to elicit a strong caspase-1 response towards certain strains of S. epidermidis. Further experiments with a larger number of individuals are warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IVYSPRING, 2018
Keywords
Staphylococcus epidermidis, caspase-1, neutrophils, prosthetic joint infections, host-pathogen interaction
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65927 (URN)10.7150/jbji.21567 (DOI)29545990 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-21 Created: 2018-03-21 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Månsson, E., Söderquist, B., Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å., Särndahl, E. & Demirel, I. (2018). Staphylococcus epidermidis from prosthetic joint infections induces lower IL-1 release from human neutrophils than isolates from normal flora. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 126(8), 678-684
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staphylococcus epidermidis from prosthetic joint infections induces lower IL-1 release from human neutrophils than isolates from normal flora
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2018 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 126, no 8, p. 678-684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) differs from S.epidermidis isolated from normal flora in terms of its capacity to induce activation of caspase-1 and release of IL-1 in human neutrophils. The amount of active caspase-1 was determined over 6h by detecting Ac-YVAD-AMC fluorescence in human neutrophils incubated with S.epidermidis isolates from PJIs (ST2) or normal flora. The amount of IL-1 was detected by ELISA in neutrophil supernatants after 6h of incubation. Mean IL-1 release was lower after incubation with S.epidermidis from PJIs compared to isolates from normal flora, but no statistically significant difference was found in active caspase-1. Substantial inter-individual differences in both active caspase-1 and IL-1 were noted. These results suggest that evasion of innate immune response, measured as reduced capacity to induce release of IL-1 from human neutrophils, might be involved in the predominance of ST2 in S.epidermidis PJIs, but that other microbe-related factors are probably also important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
Staphylococcus epidermidis, prosthesis-related infections, pathology, host-pathogen interactions, immunology, caspase-1, interleukin-1beta
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68468 (URN)10.1111/apm.12861 (DOI)000440136000004 ()2-s2.0-85050768159 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Salih, L., Tevell, S., Månsson, E., Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å., Hellmark, B. & Söderquist, B. (2018). Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from nares and prosthetic joint infections are mupirocin susceptible. Journal of bone and joint infection, 3(1), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from nares and prosthetic joint infections are mupirocin susceptible
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2018 (English)In: Journal of bone and joint infection, ISSN 2206-3552, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the present study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility including mupirocin among Staphylococcus. epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) (n=183) and nasal isolates (n=75) from patients intended to undergo prosthetic joint replacements. Susceptibility to mupirocin (used for eradication of nasal carriership of Staphylococcus aureus) was investigated by gradient test, and susceptibility to various other antimicrobial agents was investigated by disc diffusion test. All isolates, except three from PJIs and one from the nares, were fully susceptible to mupirocin. Multi-drug resistance (≥3 antibiotic classes) was found in 154/183 (84.2%) of the PJI isolates but only in 2/75 (2.7%) of the nares isolates, indicating that S. epidermidis causing PJIs do not originate from the nares.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ivyspring International Publisher, 2018
Keywords
Antibiotic susceptibility testing, Mupirocin, Prosthetic joint infections, Staphylococcus epidermidis
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64047 (URN)10.7150/jbji.22459 (DOI)29291157 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Månsson, E., Hellmark, B., Stegger, M., Andersen, P. S., Sundqvist, M. & Söderquist, B. (2017). Genomic relatedness of Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates of different origins. Journal of Medical Microbiology, 66(5), 601-608
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genomic relatedness of Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates of different origins
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0022-2615, E-ISSN 1473-5644, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the study was to characterize clinical and environmental Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates with regard to genomic diversity and antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR and core genome phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data verified the presence of distinct clades comprising closely related S. pettenkoferi isolates from different geographical locations and origins.

Methodology: Phylogenetic relationships between 25 S. pettenkoferi isolates collected from blood cultures and intra-operative air sampling were determined by repetitive-sequence-based PCR typing and analysis of similar to 157 000 SNPs identified in the core genome after WGS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing and tests for biofilm production (microtitre plate assay) were performed.

Results: Repetitive-sequence-based PCR as well as WGS data demonstrated the close relatedness of clinically significant blood culture isolates to probable contaminants, as well as to environmental isolates. Antibiotic-susceptibility testing demonstrated a low level of antimicrobial resistance. The mecA gene was present in two cefoxitin-resistant isolates. No isolates were found to produce biofilm.

Conclusion: Close genomic relatedness of S. pettenkoferi isolates from different geographical locations and origins were found within clades, but with substantial genomic difference between the two major clades. The ecological niche of S. pettenkoferi remains unconfirmed, but the presence of S. pettenkoferi in the air of the operating field favours the suggestion of a role in skin flora. Identification of S. pettenkoferi in clinical samples should, in a majority of cases, most likely be regarded as a probable contamination, and its role as a possible pathogen in immunocompromised hosts remains to be clarified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Microbiology Society, 2017
Keywords
Staphylococcus pettenkoferi, genotypic relatedness, repetitive-sequence based PCR typing, whole-genome sequencing
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58000 (URN)10.1099/jmm.0.000472 (DOI)000401984900007 ()28530888 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019900525 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro County Council Research Committee, Örebro, Sweden

Centre for Clinical Research, Västerås  

County Council of Västmanland Research Fund 

Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Månsson, E., Hellmark, B., Sundqvist, M. & Söderquist, B. (2015). Sequence types of Staphylococcus epidermidis associated with prosthetic joint infections are not present in the laminar airflow during prosthetic joint surgery. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 123(7), 589-595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sequence types of Staphylococcus epidermidis associated with prosthetic joint infections are not present in the laminar airflow during prosthetic joint surgery
2015 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 123, no 7, p. 589-595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) has demonstrated a predominance of healthcare-associated multi-drug resistant sequence types (ST2 and ST215). How, and when, patients acquire these nosocomial STs is not known. The aim was to investigate if sequence types of S. epidermidis associated with PJIs are found in the air during prosthetic joint surgery. Air sampling was undertaken during 17 hip/knee arthroplasties performed in operating theaters equipped with mobile laminar airflow units in a 500-bed hospital in central Sweden. Species identification was performed using MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Isolates identified as S. epidermidis were further characterized by MLST and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Seven hundred and thirty-five isolates were available for species identification. Micrococcus spp. (n = 303) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 217) constituted the majority of the isolates. Thirty-two isolates of S. epidermidis were found. S. epidermidis isolates demonstrated a high level of allelic diversity with 18 different sequence types, but neither ST2 nor ST215 was found. Commensals with low pathogenic potential dominated among the airborne microorganisms in the operating field during prosthetic joint surgery. Nosocomial sequence types of S. epidermidis associated with PJIs were not found, and other routes of inoculation are therefore of interest in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Staphylococcus epidermidis, ST2, ST215, prosthetic joint infections, airborne transmission
National Category
Infectious Medicine Immunology in the medical area
Research subject
Immunology; Microbiology; Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44704 (URN)10.1111/apm.12392 (DOI)000356972400007 ()25951935 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84932196136 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro County Council Research Committee, Örebro Sweden

Centre for Clinical Research, Västerås

County Council of Västmanland Research Fund

Available from: 2015-05-27 Created: 2015-05-27 Last updated: 2018-06-30Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2867-1044

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