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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Mewes, J. (2014). Diane Sainsbury Welfare States and Immigrant Rights: The Politics of Inclusion and Exclusion [Review]. British Journal of Sociology, 65(3), 586-587
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diane Sainsbury Welfare States and Immigrant Rights: The Politics of Inclusion and Exclusion
2014 (English)In: British Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0007-1315, E-ISSN 1468-4446, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 586-587Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2014
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44083 (URN)10.1111/1468-4446.12093 (DOI)000342667500015 ()
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Mewes, J. (2014). Gen(d)eralized Trust: Women, Work, and Trust in Strangers. European Sociological Review, 30(3), 373-386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gen(d)eralized Trust: Women, Work, and Trust in Strangers
2014 (English)In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 373-386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article deals with the question as to whether gender equality in labour force participation affects generalized trust. Following the seminal work of Rothstein and Uslaner, a first hypothesis maintains that gender employment equality positively impacts generalized trust. Based on insights from intergroup contact theory and the affect theory of social exchange, a second hypothesis argues that the relationship between gender employment equality and generalized trust holds only for women. Bayesian multilevel regression analysis based on cross-national survey data from the first five rounds of the European Social Survey (2002–2010) supports the latter hypothesis, showing that a country’s level of gender equality in labour force participation mediates the association between gender and generalized trust. In contrast, there is no evidence for a general impact of gender employment equality on trust in strangers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2014
Keywords
trust, gender, comparative, work, employment
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44070 (URN)10.1093/esr/jcu049 (DOI)000337977800008 ()2-s2.0-84902176775 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-04-10 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Mewes, J. & Mau, S. (2013). Globalization, socio-economic status and welfare chauvinism: European perspectives on attitudes toward the exclusion of immigrants. International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 54(3), 228-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Globalization, socio-economic status and welfare chauvinism: European perspectives on attitudes toward the exclusion of immigrants
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology, ISSN 0020-7152, E-ISSN 1745-2554, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 228-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses the question of whether globalization impacts individual preferences to exclude immigrants from national welfare systems (‘welfare chauvinism’). Intergroup contact theory and arguments from the ‘new cosmopolitanism’ debate suggest that cross-border social contacts (‘social globalization’) foster a willingness to include and accept newcomers. However, group conflict theory suggests that trade openness (‘economic globalization’) can unleash feelings of insecurity and trigger welfare chauvinism. While these approaches point in different directions, we argue that the impact of globalization on welfare chauvinism differs across socio-economic status groups. Using cross-national data from the European Social Survey 2008/2009, we find scarce support for the hypothesis that social globalization reduces welfare chauvinism in general. However, there is evidence that it diminishes exclusionary attitudes among those with relatively high socio-economic statuses. Moreover, we find no general evidence for an impact of economic globalization on chauvinism, but a positive interaction of intensified engagement with global market forces and higher socio-economic status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2013
Keywords
comparative research, globalization, immigration, socio-economic status, welfare state
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44072 (URN)10.1177/0020715213494395 (DOI)000325153700004 ()2-s2.0-84884884788 (Scopus ID)
Note

Sponsors:

European Science Foundation (ESF) Grant no: MA3282/3-1

Swedish council for working life and social research Grant no: 2011-0019

Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Mau, S. & Mewes, J. (2013). Horizontal Europeanization and identification with Europe (1ed.). In: McMahon, Richard (Ed.), Post-identity?: culture and European integration (pp. 176-190). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Horizontal Europeanization and identification with Europe
2013 (English)In: Post-identity?: culture and European integration / [ed] McMahon, Richard, London: Routledge , 2013, 1, p. 176-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2013 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge/European Sociolocial Association Studies in European Societies ; 19
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44067 (URN)978-0-415-64376-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-10-03 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Mau, S. & Mewes, J. (2012). Horizontal europeanisation in contextual perspective: what drives cross-border activities within the European Union?. European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, 14(1), 7-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Horizontal europeanisation in contextual perspective: what drives cross-border activities within the European Union?
2012 (English)In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 7-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the current discourse it is frequently stated that in the course of European integration and globalisation we witness more intensified and more frequent transactions spanning across national borders. These assumptions relate not only to transactions in the economic sphere or to forms of political co-operation, but to the individual lifeworlds as well. Yet concerning the latter dimension, research into the patterns and dynamics of interpersonal interaction, relationships, and forms of mobility across national borders is scarce. This paper is a contribution towards filling this research lacuna. It addresses the question of the extent to which horizontal Europeanisation, understood as different forms of individual cross-border activities within the European Union, depends on characteristics at the country level. From a comparative perspective we will analyse the transnational mobility and cross-border networks of European citizens within a European context. Empirically, we refer to data from the Eurobarometer 65.1 (2006), which allows us to answer the question how certain contextual variables, such as internationalisation, modernisation, and characteristics such as the respective country's geography, affect people's participation in cross-border activities. Based on a sample of 25 European countries, we will demonstrate that geographic characteristics drive social transnationalism less than internationalisation, Europeanisation, and modernisation, which contribute to a proliferation of individual transnational activities across the European Union.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2012
Keywords
transnationalism, horizontal Europeanisation, comparative research, social networks, mobility
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44066 (URN)10.1080/14616696.2011.638083 (DOI)000301865600002 ()2-s2.0-84858663611 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Mewes, J. (2012). Managing Ethnic Diversity: Meanings and Practices from an International Perspective [Review]. Contemporary Sociology, 41(4), 494-495
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing Ethnic Diversity: Meanings and Practices from an International Perspective
2012 (English)In: Contemporary Sociology, ISSN 0094-3061, E-ISSN 1939-8638, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 494-495Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ashgate, 2012
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44069 (URN)10.1177/0094306112449614m (DOI)000305759900038 ()
Available from: 2012-07-23 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Mewes, J. & Mau, S. (2012). Unraveling Working-Class Welfare Chauvinism. In: Stefan Svallfors (Ed.), Contested Welfare States: Welfare Attitudes in Europe and Beyond (pp. 119-157). Stanford: Stanford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unraveling Working-Class Welfare Chauvinism
2012 (English)In: Contested Welfare States: Welfare Attitudes in Europe and Beyond / [ed] Stefan Svallfors, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2012, p. 119-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2012
Series
Studies in Social Inequality
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44071 (URN)9780804782524 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-09-06 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Mau, S., Mewes, J. & Schöneck, N. M. (2012). What determines subjective socio-economic insecurity?: Context and class in comparative perspective. Socio-Economic Review, 10(4), 655-682
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What determines subjective socio-economic insecurity?: Context and class in comparative perspective
2012 (English)In: Socio-Economic Review, ISSN 1475-1461, E-ISSN 1475-147X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 655-682Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The phenomenon of socio-economic insecurity is widely discussed in contemporary public and academic discourse. However, it is unclear how objective socio-economic and institutional conditions affect subjective feelings of insecurity. Based on a review of the relevant literature, we hypothesize that objective contextual factors of labour market characteristics, levels of social protection and levels of internationalization and globalization exacerbate or mitigate subjective feelings of insecurity. We derive and test specific hypotheses using data from the fourth round of the European Social Survey (fielded 2008/2009). Based on our multilevel analysis of 18 412 individuals in 19 countries, we find that socio-economic (GDP) and institutional (welfare state effort) factors are relevant to subjective socio-economic insecurity, whereas the degree of internationalization (economic globalization, share of foreign-born population) plays a surprisingly negligible role. Moreover, significant cross-level interactions among social class and income inequality, unemployment, labour market regulation and economic globalization indicate that these country-level factors have a class-specific impact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012
Keywords
socio-economic insecurity, globalization, labor market protection, social security, C31 cross-sectional models, spatial models, treatment effect models, quantile regressions, social interaction models, I30 welfare and poverty general, Z13 economic sociology, economic anthropology, social and economic stratification
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44068 (URN)10.1093/ser/mws001 (DOI)000309131200003 ()2-s2.0-84866757360 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-05-04 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Mau, S., Mewes, J. & Schöneck, N. M. (2011). The production of social security: employment security, income maintenance, and health provision in cross-national perspective [Die Produktion sozialer Sicherheit Beschäftigungssicherheit, Einkommenssicherung und gesundheitliche Versorgung in ländervergleichender Perspektive]. Berliner Journal für Soziologie, 21(2), 175-202
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The production of social security: employment security, income maintenance, and health provision in cross-national perspective [Die Produktion sozialer Sicherheit Beschäftigungssicherheit, Einkommenssicherung und gesundheitliche Versorgung in ländervergleichender Perspektive]
2011 (German)In: Berliner Journal für Soziologie, ISSN 0863-1808, E-ISSN 1862-2593, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 175-202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the current public discourse the phenomenon of insecurity is widely discussed since various kinds of social risks are becoming more widespread throughout European societies threatening biographical stability and status security. Given this there is a quest for a realignment of state interventions aiming at the (reproduction of stability and security. It is assumed that institutional arrangements and interventions such as employment protection, income maintenance schemes and healthcare provision not only contribute to objective but also to subjective security. Using data from the European Social Survey 2008 for the labor force in 20 European nations, we test this assumption by scrutinizing three kinds of perceived social risks: the risk of job loss, the risk of lack of monetary means and the risk of insufficient healthcare provision. We take on a cross-national perspective and conduct ordinal multi-level regression analyses in order to measure the extent to which different levels of social policy interventions can be accounted for differences in subjective insecurity. We find that a high degree of employment protection - astomsliingly - does not enhance the perceived employment security significantly, whereas higher levels of social security spending and healthcare expenditure indeed go along with higher levels of subjective security. This relationship is moderated by the general level of economic development. Adapted from the source document. Reprinted by permission of VS Verlag fÃŒr Sozialwissenschaften, Germany; In the current public discourse the phenomenon of insecurity is widely discussed since various kinds of social risks are becoming more widespread throughout European societies threatening biographical stability and status security. Given this there is a quest for a realignment of state interventions aiming at the (re-)production of stability and security. It is assumed that institutional arrangements and interventions such as employment protection, income maintenance schemes and healthcare provision not only contribute to objective but also to subjective security. Using data from the European Social Survey 2008 for the labor force in 20 European nations, we test this assumption by scrutinizing three kinds of perceived social risks: the risk of job loss, the risk of lack of monetary means and the risk of insufficient healthcare provision. We take on a cross-national perspective and conduct ordinal multi-level regression analyses in order to measure the extent to which different levels of social policy interventions can be accounted for differences in subjective insecurity. We find that a high degree of employment protection-astonishingly-does not enhance the perceived employment security significantly, whereas higher levels of social security spending and healthcare expenditure indeed go along with higher levels of subjective security. This relationship is moderated by the general level of economic development.; In the current public discourse the phenomenon of insecurity is widely discussed since various kinds of social risks are becoming more widespread throughout European societies threatening biographical stability and status security. Given this there is a quest for a realignment of state interventions aiming at the (reproduction of stability and security. It is assumed that institutional arrangements and interventions such as employment protection, income maintenance schemes and healthcare provision not only contribute to objective but also to subjective security. Using data from the European Social Survey 2008 for the labor force in 20 European nations, we test this assumption by scrutinizing three kinds of perceived social risks: the risk of job loss, the risk of lack of monetary means and the risk of insufficient healthcare provision. We take on a cross-national perspective and conduct ordinal multi-level regression analyses in order to measure the extent to which different levels of social policy interventions can be accounted for differences in subjective insecurity. We find that a high degree of employment protection – astomsliingly – does not enhance the perceived employment security significantly, whereas higher levels of social security spending and healthcare expenditure indeed go along with higher levels of subjective security. This relationship is moderated by the general level of economic development. Adapted from the source document.; In the current public discourse the phenomenon of insecurity is widely discussed since various kinds of social risks are becoming more widespread throughout European societies threatening biographical stability and status security. Given this there is a quest for a realignment of state interventions aiming at the (reproduction of stability and security. It is assumed that institutional arrangements and interventions such as employment protection, income maintenance schemes and healthcare provision not only contribute to objective but also to subjective security. Using data from the European Social Survey 2008 for the labor force in 20 European nations, we test this assumption by scrutinizing three kinds of perceived social risks: the risk of job loss, the risk of lack of monetary means and the risk of insufficient healthcare provision. We take on a cross-national perspective and conduct ordinal multi-level regression analyses in order to measure the extent to which different levels of social policy interventions can be accounted for differences in subjective insecurity. We find that a high degree of employment protection – astomsliingly – does not enhance the perceived employment security significantly, whereas higher levels of social security spending and healthcare expenditure indeed go along with higher levels of subjective security. This relationship is moderated by the general level of economic development. Adapted from the source document.

Abstract [de]

In der gegenwärtigen öffentlichen Debatte wird über neue Formen der sozialen Verunsicherung intensiv diskutiert, da sich verschiedene Arten sozialer Risiken offenbar über weite Teile europäischer Gesellschaften ausbreiten und biografische Stabilität und Statussicherheit gefährden. Angesichts dieser Wahrnehmung wird immer wieder der Ruf nach einer Neuausrichtung staatlicher Intervention laut, um wieder Stabilität und Sicherheit herzustellen. Die dahinter liegende Annahme lautet, dass institutionelle Arrangements der Arbeitsmarktregulierung, Einkommenssicherung und Gesundheitspolitik nicht nur zur Produktion objektiver, sondern auch subjektiver Sicherheit beitragen können. Anhand von Daten des European Social Survey 2008 für Erwerbspersonen in 20 europäischen Staaten überprüfen wir diese Hypothese, indem wir drei Arten wahrgenommener sozialer Risiken – das Risiko eines Arbeitsplatzverlustes, das Risiko von Geldknappheit und das Risiko nicht ausreichender Gesundheitsversorgung im Krankheitsfall – näher untersuchen. Wir nehmen eine vergleichende Perspektive ein und untersuchen mit Hilfe ordinaler Mehrebenenmodelle, inwieweit sozialpolitische Interventionsniveaus die Unterschiede der subjektiven Unsicherheiten erklären können. Die Befunde zeigen, dass ein hohes Ausmaß arbeitsmarktlicher Regulierung – bemerkenswerterweise – nicht zur Produktion subjektiver (Arbeitsplatz-)Sicherheit beiträgt, während höhere Sozialausgaben und Gesundheitsausgaben durchaus mit größeren subjektiven Sicherheiten einhergehen. Moderiert wird dieser Zusammenhang von den allgemeinen wirtschaftlichen Bedingungen.

Abstract [fr]

Dans le débat public actuel, les nouvelles formes d’insécurité sociale font l’objet de vives discussions tandis que différentes formes de risques sociaux gagnent manifestement tout un pan des sociétés européennes compromettant ainsi stabilité biographique et sécurité des statuts sociaux. Face à ce constat, des voix s’élèvent régulièrement pour demander une réorganisation de l’intervention étatique dans le but de rétablir stabilité et sécurité. Cette revendication repose sur l’hypothèse que les dispositifs institutionnels de régulation du marché du travail, de garantie des revenus et de politique de santé peuvent contribuer à produire une sécurité non seulement objective mais aussi subjective. Nous vérifions cette hypothèse à partir de données de l’Enquête Sociale Européenne (ESS) 2008 portant sur des actifs de 20 pays européens en étudiant de plus près trois formes de risques sociaux perçus (le risque de perte d’emploi, le risque de difficultés financières et le risque de couverture médicale insuffisante en cas de maladie). Nous adoptons une perspective comparative et étudions à l’aide de modèles multi-niveaux ordinaux la question de savoir dans quelle mesure les niveaux d’intervention publique peuvent expliquer les différences quant à la perception des insécurités. Nos résultats montrent qu’un degré élevé de régulation du marché du travail, étonnamment, ne contribue pas à la production de sécurité subjective (de l’emploi) tandis que les dépenses sociales et de santé sont plus élevées tout à fait corrélées à une plus grande sécurité subjective. Cette corrélation est atténuée par les conditions économiques générales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
VS-Verlag, 2011
Keywords
Social security, Subjective security, Subjective insecurity, Employment, Income, Health
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44093 (URN)10.1007/s11609-011-0157-9 (DOI)000292270300002 ()2-s2.0-81055145043 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-07 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
Mewes, J. (2010). Ungleiche Netzwerke - vernetzte Ungleichheit: Persönliche Beziehungen im Kontext von Bildung und Status (1ed.). Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ungleiche Netzwerke - vernetzte Ungleichheit: Persönliche Beziehungen im Kontext von Bildung und Status
2010 (German)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [de]

Von sozialen Netzwerken wird oftmals angenommen, dass sie gleichsam einen Schutzschild gegenüber der viel beschworenen Zweck-Mittel-Rationalität moderner Gesellschaften bilden. Doch werden nicht auch die Gelegenheitsstrukturen informeller Beziehungen durch die Sozialstruktur geprägt? Jan Mewes geht dieser Frage nach und untersucht, inwiefern die Schichtzugehörigkeit der Individuen die Strukturierung ihrer sozialen Netzwerke beeinflusst. Dabei zeigt sich, dass Angehörige unterer sozialer Schichten einem erhöhten Risiko der ‚doppelten Exklusion’ unterliegen, setzt sich ihre gesellschaftliche Benachteiligung doch auch auf der Ebene persönlicher Beziehungen fort.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, 2010. p. 229 Edition: 1
Series
Netzwerkforschung
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44100 (URN)978-3-531-92301-7 (ISBN)
Note

Zugl.: Bremen, Univ., Diss., 2009

Available from: 2015-04-07 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4974-2956

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