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Rotander, Anna
Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Karlsson, T. M., Kärrman, A., Rotander, A. & Hassellöv, M. (2020). Comparison between manta trawl and in situ pump filtration methods, and guidance for visual identification of microplastics in surface waters. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 27(5), 5559-5571
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison between manta trawl and in situ pump filtration methods, and guidance for visual identification of microplastics in surface waters
2020 (English)In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 5559-5571Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Owing to the development and adoption of a variety of methods for sampling and identifying microplastics, there is now data showing the presence of microplastics in surface waters from all over the world. The difference between the methods, however, hampers comparisons, and to date, most studies are qualitative rather than quantitative. In order to allow for a quantitative comparison of microplastics abundance, it is crucial to understand the differences between sampling methods. Therefore, a manta trawl and an in situ filtering pump were compared during realistic, but controlled, field tests. Identical microplastic analyses of all replicates allowed the differences between the methods with respect to (1) precision, (2) concentrations, and (3) composition to be assessed. The results show that the pump gave higher accuracy with respect to volume than the trawl. The trawl, however, sampled higher concentrations, which appeared to be due to a more efficient sampling of particles on the sea surface microlayer, such as expanded polystyrene and air-filled microspheres. The trawl also sampled a higher volume, which decreased statistical counting uncertainties. A key finding in this study was that, regardless of sampling method, it is critical that a sufficiently high volume is sampled to provide enough particles for statistical evaluation. Due to the patchiness of this type of contaminant, our data indicate that a minimum of 26 particles per sample should be recorded to allow for concentration comparisons and to avoid false null values. The necessary amount of replicates to detect temporal or spatial differences is also discussed. For compositional differences and size distributions, even higher particle counts would be necessary. Quantitative measurements and comparisons would also require an unbiased approach towards both visual and spectroscopic identification. To facilitate the development of such methods, a visual protocol that can be further developed to fit different needs is introduced and discussed. Some of the challenges encountered while using FTIR microspectroscopic particle identification are also critically discussed in relation to specific compositions found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Microplastics, Surface water sampling, Monitoring, Particle quantification, Method development, Plasticpollution, Microlitter
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79287 (URN)10.1007/s11356-019-07274-5 (DOI)000514845700080 ()31853844 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077049418 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 308370Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, 2175-17Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2219-17-015
Note

Funding Agencies:

Nordic council of ministers  HARMIC

Joint Programming Initiative Oceans  BASEMAN

Available from: 2020-01-21 Created: 2020-01-21 Last updated: 2020-03-17Bibliographically approved
Schönlau, C., Karlsson, T. M., Rotander, A., Nilsson, H., Engwall, M., van Bavel, B. & Kärrman, A. (2020). Microplastics in sea-surface waters surrounding Sweden sampled by manta trawl and in-situ pump. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 153, Article ID 111019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microplastics in sea-surface waters surrounding Sweden sampled by manta trawl and in-situ pump
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2020 (English)In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 153, article id 111019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microplastics were sampled in open surface waters by using a manta trawl and an in-situ filtering pump. A total of 24 trawl samples and 11 pump samples were taken at 12 locations around Sweden. Overall, the concentration of microplastic particles was higher in pump samples compared to trawl samples. The median microplastic particle concentration was 0.04 particles per m−3 for manta trawl samples and 0.10 particles per m−3 in pump samples taken with a mesh size of 0.3 mm. The highest concentrations were recorded on the west coast of Sweden. Fibers were found in all samples and were also more frequent in the pump samples. Even higher concentrations of fibers and particles were found on the 0.05 mm pump filters. Using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging the majority of the particles were identified as polyethylene followed by polypropylene.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Baltic Sea, Kattegat, Microplastic sampling methods, Plastic pollution, Polyethylene, Polypropylene, Skagerrak
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80631 (URN)10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111019 (DOI)2-s2.0-85080091668 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-13 Created: 2020-03-13 Last updated: 2020-03-13Bibliographically approved
Schönlau, C., Larsson, M., Dubocq, F., Rotander, A., Van der Zande, R., Engwall, M. & Kärrman, A. (2019). Effect-Directed Analysis of Ah Receptor-Mediated Potencies in Microplastics Deployed in a Remote Tropical Marine Environment. Frontiers in Environmental Science, 7, Article ID 120.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect-Directed Analysis of Ah Receptor-Mediated Potencies in Microplastics Deployed in a Remote Tropical Marine Environment
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Environmental Science, E-ISSN 2296-665X, Vol. 7, article id 120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To facilitate the study of potential harmful compounds sorbed to microplastics, an effect-directed analysis using the DR CALUX® assay as screening tool for Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-active compounds in extracts of marine deployed microplastics and chemical analysis of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) was conducted. Pellets of three plastic polymers [low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS)] were deployed at Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, for up to 8 months. Detected AhR-mediated potencies (bio-TEQs) of extracted plastic pellets ranged from 15 to 100 pg/g. Contributions of target HOCs to the overall bioactivities were negligible. To identify the major contributors, remaining plastic pellets were used for fractionation with a gas chromatography (GC) fractionation platform featuring parallel mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The bioassay analysis showed two bioactive fractions of each polymer with bio-TEQs ranging from 5.7 to 14 pg/g. High resolution MS was used in order to identify bioactive compounds in the fractions. No AhR agonists could be identified in fractions of HDPE or LDPE. Via a multivariate statistical approach the polystyrene (PS) trimer 1e- Phenyl-4e-(1- phenylethyl)-tetralin was identified in fractions of HIPS and in fractions of the blank polymer of HIPS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
polyethylene, polystyrene, PCBs, reporter gene assay, fractionation
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75769 (URN)10.3389/fenvs.2019.00120 (DOI)000478726600002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 223-2014-1064Knowledge Foundation, 20160019
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Baduel, C., Mueller, J. F., Rotander, A., Corfield, J. & Gomez-Ramos, M.-J. (2017). Discovery of novel per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) at a fire fighting training ground and preliminary investigation of their fate and mobility. Chemosphere, 185, 1030-1038
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discovery of novel per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) at a fire fighting training ground and preliminary investigation of their fate and mobility
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2017 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 185, p. 1030-1038Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aqueous film forming foams (AFFFs) have been released at fire training facilities for several decades resulting in the contamination of soil and groundwater by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). AFFF compositions are proprietary and may contain a broad range of PFASs for which the chemical structures and degradation products are not known. In this study, high resolution quadrupole-time-of flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS/MS) in combination with data processing using filtering strategies was applied to characterize and elucidate the PFASs present in concrete extracts collected at a fire training ground after the historical use of various AFFF formulations. Twelve different fluorochemical classes, representing more than 60 chemicals, were detected and identified in the concrete extracts. Novel PFASs homologues, unmonitored before in environmental samples such as chlorinated PFSAs, ketone PFSAs, dichlorinated PFSAs and perfluoroalkane sulphonamides (FASAs) were detected in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the fire training ground. Their detection in the soil cores (from 0 to 2 m) give an insight on the potential mobility of these newly identified PFASs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, UK: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Non target analysis, PFASs, Contaminated soil, Groundwater contamination, Aqueous film forming foam (AFFF), LC-QTOF-MS/MS
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61034 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.06.096 (DOI)000408597300116 ()28763938 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85025671626 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

ARC Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities (LIEF)  LE 140100129 

ARC  FF 120100546 

Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Bräunig, J., Baduel, C., Heffernan, A., Rotander, A., Donaldson, E. & Mueller, J. F. (2017). Fate and redistribution of perfluoroalkyl acids through AFFF-impacted groundwater. Science of the Total Environment, 596, 360-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fate and redistribution of perfluoroalkyl acids through AFFF-impacted groundwater
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2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 596, p. 360-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Leaching of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from a local point source, a fire-fighting training area, has led to extensive contamination of a groundwater aquifer which has spread underneath part of a nearby town, Oakey, situated in the State of Queensland, Australia. Groundwater is extracted by residents from privately owned wells for daily activities such as watering livestock and garden beds. The concentration of 10 PFAAs in environmental and biological samples (water, soil, grass, chicken egg yolk, serum of horses, cattle and sheep), as well as human serum was investigated to determine the extent of contamination in the town and discuss fate and redistribution of PFAAs. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the dominant PFAA in all matrices investigated, followed by perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS). PFOS concentrations measured in water ranged between <0.17-14 mu g/L, concentrations of PFHxS measured between <0.07-6 mu g/L. PFAAs were detected in backyards (soil, grass), livestock and chicken egg yolk. Significant differences (p < 0.01) in PFOS and PFHxS concentrations in two groups of cattle were found, one held within the contamination plume, the other in the vicinity but outside of the contamination plume. In human serum PFOS concentrations ranged from 38 to 381 mu g/L, while PFHxS ranged from 39 to 214 mu g/L. Highest PFOS concentrations measured in human serum were >30-fold higher compared to the general Australian population. Through use of contaminated groundwater secondary sources of PFAA contamination are created on private property, leading to further redistribution of contamination and creation of additional human exposure pathways.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Groundwater contamination, Aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF), Human blood serum, Creation of secondary sources
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57896 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.095 (DOI)000401557600038 ()28441576 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018462297 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

ARC future fellowship  FF120100546 

University of Queensland  

Queensland Department of Health 

Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Rotander, A., Toms, L.-M. L., Aylward, L., Kay, M. & Mueller, J. F. (2015). Elevated levels of PFOS and PFHxS in firefighters exposed to aqueous film forming foam (AFFF). Environment International, 82, 28-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevated levels of PFOS and PFHxS in firefighters exposed to aqueous film forming foam (AFFF)
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2015 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 82, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exposure to aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) was evaluated in 149 firefighters working at AFFF training facilities in Australia by analysis of PFOS and related compounds in serum. A questionnaire was designed to capture information about basic demographic factors, lifestyle factors and potential occupational exposure (such as work history and self-reported skin contact with foam). The results showed that a number of factors were associated with PFAA serum concentrations. Blood donation was found to be linked to low PFAA levels, and the concentrations of PFOS and PFHxS were found to be positively associated with years of jobs with AFFF contact. The highest levels of PFOS and PFHxS were one order of magnitude higher compared to the general population in Australia and Canada. Study participants who had worked ten years or less had levels of PFOS that were similar to or only slightly above those of the general population. This coincides with the phase out of 3M AFFF from all training facilities in 2003, and suggests that the exposures to PFOS and PFHxS in AFFF have declined in recent years. Self-reporting of skin contact and frequency of contact were used as an index of exposure. Using this index, there was no relationship between PFOS levels and skin exposure. This index of exposure is limited as it relies on self-report and it only considers skin exposure to AFFF, and does not capture other routes of potential exposure. Possible associations between serum PFAA concentrations and five biochemical outcomes were assessed. The outcomes were serum cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins, and uric acid. No statistical associations between any of these endpoints and serum PFAA concentrations were observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, United Kingdom: Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF), biomarkers, firefighters, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA), serum
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55194 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2015.05.005 (DOI)000357909800004 ()26001497 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84929469626 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

ARC Future Fellowship 

ARC DECRA 

University of Queensland 

Queensland Health 

Available from: 2017-02-02 Created: 2017-02-02 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Rotander, A., Kärrman, A., Toms, L.-M. L., Kay, M., Mueller, J. F. & Gómez Ramos, M. J. (2015). Novel fluorinated surfactants tentatively identified in firefighters using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and a case-control approach. Environmental Science and Technology, 49(4), 2434-2442
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel fluorinated surfactants tentatively identified in firefighters using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and a case-control approach
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2015 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 2434-2442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fluorinated surfactant-based aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) are made up of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) and are used to extinguish fires involving highly flammable liquids. The use of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in some AFFF formulations has been linked to substantial environmental contamination. Recent studies have identified a large number of novel and infrequently reported fluorinated surfactants in different AFFF formulations. In this study, a strategy based on a case-control approach using quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS/MS) and advanced statistical methods has been used to extract and identify known and unknown PFAS in human serum associated with AFFF-exposed firefighters. Two target sulfonic acids [PFOS and perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS)], three non-target acids [perfluoropentanesulfonic acid (PFPeS), perfluoroheptanesulfonic acid (PFHpS), and perfluorononanesulfonic acid (PFNS)], and four unknown sulfonic acids (Cl-PFOS, ketone-PFOS, ether-PFHxS, and Cl-PFHxS) were exclusively or significantly more frequently detected at higher levels in firefighters compared to controls. The application of this strategy has allowed for identification of previously unreported fluorinated chemicals in a timely and cost-efficient way.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42555 (URN)10.1021/es503653n (DOI)000349806400056 ()25611076 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84923090030 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Queensland Health

Australian Research Council (ARC) FF120100546

ARC DE120100161

Available from: 2015-02-09 Created: 2015-02-09 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Toms, L. M., Thompson, J., Rotander, A., Hobson, P., Calafat, A., Kato, K., . . . Mueller, J. F. (2014). Decline in perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate serum concentrations in an Australian population from 2002 to 2011. Environment International, 71, 74-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decline in perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate serum concentrations in an Australian population from 2002 to 2011
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2014 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 71, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Some perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have become widespread pollutants detected in human and wildlife samples worldwide. The main objective of this study was to assess temporal trends of PFAS concentrations in human blood in Australia over the last decade (2002-2011), taking into consideration age and sex trends.

Pooled human sera from 2002/03 (n=26); 2008/09 (n=24) and 2010/11 (n=24) from South East Queensland, Australia were obtained from de-identified surplus pathology samples and compared with samples collected previously from 2006/07 (n=84). A total of 9775 samples in 158 pools were available for an assessment of PFASs. Stratification criteria included sex and age: <. 16. years (2002/03 only); 0-4 (2006/07, 2008/09, 2010/11); 5-15 (2006/07, 2008/09, 2010/11); 16-30; 31-45; 46-60; and >. 60. years (all collection periods). Sera were analyzed using on-line solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution-tandem mass spectrometry.

Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was detected in the highest concentrations ranging from 5.3-19.2. ng/ml (2008/09) to 4.4-17.4. ng/ml (2010/11). Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) was detected in the next highest concentration ranging from 2.8-7.3. ng/ml (2008/09) to 3.1-6.5. ng/ml (2010/11). All other measured PFASs were detected at concentrations <. 1. ng/ml with the exception of perfluorohexane sulfonate which ranged from 1.2-5.7. ng/ml (08/09) and 1.4-5.4. ng/ml (10/11). The mean concentrations of both PFOS and PFOA in the 2010/11 period compared to 2002/03 were lower for all adult age groups by 56%. For 5-15. year olds, the decrease was 66% (PFOS) and 63% (PFOA) from 2002/03 to 2010/11. For 0-4. year olds the decrease from 2006/07 (when data were first available for this age group) was 50% (PFOS) and 22% (PFOA).

This study provides strong evidence for decreasing serum PFOS and PFOA concentrations in an Australian population from 2002 through 2011. Age trends were variable and concentrations were higher in males than in females. Global use has been in decline since around 2002 and hence primary exposure levels are expected to be decreasing. Further biomonitoring will allow assessment of PFAS exposures to confirm trends in exposure as primary and eventually secondary sources are depleted.

Keywords
Biomonitoring; Human blood serum; Perfluoroalkyl; PFAS; Polyfluoroalkyl substances
National Category
Environmental Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41637 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2014.05.019 (DOI)000341745100008 ()24980755 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84903545309 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

ARC DECRA DE120100161

ARC Future Fellowship FF120100546

University of Queensland

Queensland Health

Australian Government Department of the Environment

Available from: 2015-01-15 Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, H., Kärrman, A., Rotander, A., van Bavel, B., Lindström, G. & Westberg, H. (2013). Biotransformation of fluorotelomer compound to perfluorocarboxylates in humans. Environment International, 51, 8-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biotransformation of fluorotelomer compound to perfluorocarboxylates in humans
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2013 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 51, p. 8-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Levels of perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) in biological compartments have been known for some time but their transport routes and distribution patterns are not properly elucidated. The opinions diverge whether the exposure of the general population occurs indirect through precursors or direct via PFCAs. Previous results showed that ski wax technicians are exposed to levels up to 92 000 ng/m(3) of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) via air and have elevated blood levels of PFCAs. Blood samples were collected in 2007-2011 and analyzed for C(4)-C(18) PFCAs, 6:2, 8:2 and 10:2 unsaturated fluorotelomer acids (FTUCAs) and 3:3, 5:3 and 7:3 fluorotelomer acids (FTCAs) using UPLC-MS/MS. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was detected in levels ranging from 1.90 to 628 ng/mL whole blood (wb). Metabolic intermediates 5:3 and 7:3 FTCA were detected in all samples at levels up to 6.1 and 3.9 ng/mL wb. 6:2, 8:2 and 10:2 FTUCAs showed maximum levels of 0.07, 0.64 and 0.11 ng/mL wb. Also, for the first time levels of PFHxDA and PFOcDA were detected in the human blood at mean concentrations up to 4.22 ng/mL wb and 4.25 ng/mL wb respectively. The aim of this study was to determine concentrations of PFCAs and FTOH metabolites in blood from ski wax technicians.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
National Category
Chemical Sciences Biological Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Environmental Chemistry; Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28803 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2012.09.001 (DOI)000314618100002 ()23138016 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84868330094 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency: Cancer and Allergy Foundation 

Available from: 2013-04-24 Created: 2013-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Hagberg, J., Rotander, A., van Bavel, B. & Engwall, M. (2013). Chemical and bioanalytical characterisation of PAHs in risk assessment of remediated PAH-contaminated soils. Environmental science and pollution research international, 20(12), 8511-8520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical and bioanalytical characterisation of PAHs in risk assessment of remediated PAH-contaminated soils
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2013 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 8511-8520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common contaminants in soil at former industrial areas; and in Sweden, some of the most contaminated sites are being remediated. Generic guideline values for soil use after so-called successful remediation actions of PAH-contaminated soil are based on the 16 EPA priority pollutants, which only constitute a small part of the complex cocktail of toxicants in many contaminated soils. The aim of the study was to elucidate if the actual toxicological risks of soil samples from successful remediation projects could be reflected by chemical determination of these PAHs. We compared chemical analysis (GC-MS) and bioassay analysis (H4IIE-luc) of a number of remediated PAH-contaminated soils. The H4IIE-luc bioassay is an aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-based assay that detects compounds that activate the Ah receptor, one important mechanism for PAH toxicity. Comparison of the results showed that the bioassay-determined toxicity in the remediated soil samples could only be explained to a minor extent by the concentrations of the 16 priority PAHs. The current risk assessment method for PAH-contaminated soil in use in Sweden along with other countries, based on chemical analysis of selected PAHs, is missing toxicologically relevant PAHs and other similar substances. It is therefore reasonable to include bioassays in risk assessment and in the classification of remediated PAH-contaminated soils. This could minimise environmental and human health risks and enable greater safety in subsequent reuse of remediated soils.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology; Environmental Chemistry; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29084 (URN)10.1007/s11356-013-1787-6 (DOI)000327498600022 ()
Funder
Knowledge FoundationSwedish Environmental Protection Agency
Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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