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van Hees, Patrick
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Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Larsson, M., Lam, M. M., van Hees, P., Giesy, J. P. & Engwall, M. (2018). Occurrence and leachability of polycyclic aromatic compounds in contaminated soils: Chemical and bioanalytical characterization. Science of the Total Environment, 622-623, 1476-1484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence and leachability of polycyclic aromatic compounds in contaminated soils: Chemical and bioanalytical characterization
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2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 622-623, p. 1476-1484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An important concern regarding sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) is the risk of groundwater contamination by release of the compounds from soils. The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence and leachability of 77 PACs including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic compounds (NSO-PACs) among total aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists in soils from historical contaminated sites. A novel approach combining chemical and bioanalytical methods in combination with characterization of leachability by use of a column leaching test was used. Similar profiles of relative concentrations of PACs were observed in all soils, with parent PAHs accounting for 71 to 90% of total concentrations in soils. Contribution of oxy-PAHs, alkyl-PAHs and N-PACs ranged from 2 to 9%, 3 to 9% and 1 to 14%, respectively. Although the contributions of groups of PACs were small, some compounds were found in similar or greater concentrations than parent PAHs. Leachable fractions of 77 PACs from soils were small and ranged from 0.002 to 0.54%. Polar PACs were shown to be more leachable than parent PAHs. The contribution of analyzed PACS to overall AhR-mediated activities in soils and leachates suggests presence of other AhR agonists in soils, and a potential risk. Only a small fraction of AhR agonists was available in soils, indicating an overestimation of the risk if only total initial concentrations in soils would be considered in risk assessment. The results of the study strongly support that focus on 16US EPA PAHs may result in inadequate assessment of risk and hazard of PACs in complex environmental samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Alkyl-PAHs; Oxy-PAHs; NSO-heterocyclic compounds; Ah receptor; H4IIE-luc bioassay; Column leaching test
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64301 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.015 (DOI)000426349000143 ()2-s2.0-85038841340 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2013/0157
Note

Funding Agencies:

Applicera and Formas  210-2014-87 

Canada Research Chair program  

State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs  GDT20143200016 

P.R. China  

Chinese Academy of Sciences  

Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the School of Biological Sciences of the University of Hong Kong  

Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada  326415-07 

Western Economic Diversification Canada  6578  6807  000012711 

Canada Foundation for Infrastructure  

Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Elgh-Dalgren, K., Arwidsson, Z., Ribé, V., Waara, S., von Kronhelm, T. & van Hees, P. A. W. (2011). Bioremediation of a soil industrially contaminated by wood preservatives: degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydro­carbons and monitoring of coupled arsenic distribution. Water, Air and Soil Pollution, 214(1-4), 275-285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioremediation of a soil industrially contaminated by wood preservatives: degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydro­carbons and monitoring of coupled arsenic distribution
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2011 (English)In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 214, no 1-4, p. 275-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two commercially available aerobic bioremediation methods (Daramend® and BioSan) were utilized to study the aerobic biodegradation of polycyclic aro­matic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the effect of the simultaneously present arsenic. The soil was collected at an old wood preservation site and the initial PAH16-concentration was 46 mg/kg, with mainly high molecular weight congeners. The As-concentration was105 mg/kg with low availability as assessed with se­quential extraction. To enahce the availability of PAH, the effect of a non-ionic surfactant was evaluated. Degradation of both low and high molecular weight PAH was observed, however after 30 weeks, the degradation was generally low and no treatment was significantly better than the others. The treatments had, on the other hand, an effect on As-distribution, with increased As-concentra­tion in the available fraction after treatment. This may be due to both the mi­crobial activity and the presence of anoxic micro sites in the soil. The overall efficiency of the biological treatment was further evaluated using the standar­dized ecotoxicity test utilizing Vibrio fischeri (Microtox®). The toxicity test demonstrated that the bioremediation led to an increase in toxicity, especially in treatments receiving surfactant. The surfactant implied an increase in conta­minant availability but also a decrease in surface tension, which might have contributed to the overall toxicity increase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2011
Keywords
Arsenic, Bioremediation, Microtox®, PAH, Surfactant
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7991 (URN)10.1007/s11270-010-0422-0 (DOI)000285468800023 ()2-s2.0-78650592420 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-09-23 Created: 2009-09-23 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
Elgh-Dalgren, K., Düker, A., Arwidsson, Z., von Kronhelm, T. & van Hees, P. A. W. (2011). Re-cycling of remediated soil: evaluation of leaching tests as tools for characterization. Waste Management, 31(2), 215-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Re-cycling of remediated soil: evaluation of leaching tests as tools for characterization
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2011 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 215-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, leaching tests with deionized water (D.W.) are frequently utilized in risk assessment, but implementation of these results to evaluate the risk of spreading in the environment is difficult. One problem is that most leaching procedures only consider heavy metals release, whereas organic pollutants are left out. The aim of the present study was to assess the possible pollutant miti­gation in four remediated soils, three with heavy metals and one with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), utilizing three different leaching solutions: D.W., a weak ionic solution (0.001 M CaCl2) and an artificially made soil wa­ter (ASW). In general, batch leaching implied larger contaminant removal than column leaching, possibly due to the more rough treatment of the soil particles, and guidelines would at times be exceeded by batch leaching but not column leaching. Utilization of CaCl2 was found to release much less heavy metal than D.W., whereas the metals mobilized by ASW were removed from solution by the filtration of soil leachates. Low molecular weight PAH was most efficiently mobilized by CaCl2, while D.W. worked better for high molecular weight PAH. Despite very low initial PAH-concentrations, tap- and groundwater criteria were exceeded by all leaching solutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pergamon Press, 2011
Keywords
Heavy metals, Leaching test, PAH, Re-cycling
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7992 (URN)10.1016/j.wasman.2009.12.021 (DOI)000286411400003 ()20117924 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-78649838340 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-09-23 Created: 2009-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Fujii, K., Hayakawa, C., van Hees, P. A. W., Funakawa, S. & Kosaki, T. (2010). Biodegradation of low molecular weight organic compounds and their contribution to heterotrophic soil respiration in three Japanese forest soils. Plant and Soil, 334(1-2), 475-489
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biodegradation of low molecular weight organic compounds and their contribution to heterotrophic soil respiration in three Japanese forest soils
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2010 (English)In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 334, no 1-2, p. 475-489Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low molecular weight (LMW) organic compounds in soil solution could be important substrates for heterotrophic soil respiration. The importance of LMW organic compound mineralization in heterotrophic soil respiration needs to be confirmed for different types of soils. The concentrations of LMW organic compounds in soil solution and mineralization kinetics of C-14-radiolabelled glucose, acetate, oxalate and citrate were studied in three Japanese forest soils (Andisol, Spodosol and Inceptisol) with varying adsorption capacities. Based on those results, the fluxes of LMW organic compound mineralization and their magnitude relative to heterotrophic soil respiration were quantified. Monosaccharides and organic acids comprised on average 5.9-11.2% and 0.9-1.4% of dissolved organic carbon in soil solution, respectively. Monosaccharide mineralization make up 49-74% of heterotrophic (basal) soil respiration at the soil-profile scale, while organic acid mineralization accounts for between 5% (Andisol) and 47-58% (Spodosol and Inceptisol) of heterotrophic soil respiration. The mineralization of LMW organic compounds is a substantial fraction of heterotrophic soil respiration regardless of soil type, owing to their rapid and continuous production and consumption. The specific contribution of organic acid mineralization to heterotrophic soil respiration varies depending on soil adsorption capacities, namely iron and aluminum oxides.

Keywords
Adsorption, Dissolved organic carbon, Low molecular weight organic acid, Mineralization, Monosaccharide, Soil respiration
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12894 (URN)10.1007/s11104-010-0398-y (DOI)000281055700037 ()
Available from: 2011-01-05 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2018-04-23Bibliographically approved
Arwidsson, Z., Elgh-Dalgren, K., von Kronhelm, T., Sjoberg, R., Allard, B. & van Hees, P. A. W. (2010). Remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil washing residues with amino polycarboxylic acids. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 173(1-3), 697-704
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil washing residues with amino polycarboxylic acids
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 173, no 1-3, p. 697-704Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Removal of Cu, Pb, and Zn by the action of the two biodegradable chelating agents [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), as well as citric acid, was tested. Three soil samples, which had previously been treated by conventional soil washing (water), were utilized in the leaching tests. Experiments were performed in batches (0.3 kg-scale) and with a WTC-mixer system (Water Treatment Construction, 10 kg-scale). EDDS and MGDA were most often equally efficient in removing Cu, Pb, and Zn after 10-60 min. Nonetheless, after 10 d, there were occasionally significant differences in extraction efficiencies. Extraction with citric acid was generally less efficient, however equal for Zn (mainly) after 10 d. Metal removal was similar in batch and WTC-mixer systems, which indicates that a dynamic mixer system could be used in full-scale. Use of biodegradable amino polycarboxylic acids for metal removal, as a second step after soil washing, would release most remaining metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) from the present soils, however only after long leaching time. Thus, a full-scale procedure, based on enhanced metal leaching by amino polycarboxylic acids from soil of the present kind, Would require a pre-leaching step lasting several days in order to be efficient. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Heavy metals, Amino polycarboxylic acids, Soil, Remediation, EDDS, MGDA
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-13043 (URN)10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.08.141 (DOI)000273135600098 ()
Available from: 2011-01-03 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
Elgh-Dalgren, K., Waara, S., Düker, A., von Kronhelm, T. & van Hees, P. A. W. (2009). Anaerobic bioremediation of a soil with mixed contaminants: Explosives degradation and influence on heavy metal distribution, monitored as changes in concentration and toxicity. Water, Air and Soil Pollution, 202(1-4), 301-313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anaerobic bioremediation of a soil with mixed contaminants: Explosives degradation and influence on heavy metal distribution, monitored as changes in concentration and toxicity
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2009 (English)In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 202, no 1-4, p. 301-313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two soils with explosives and metals were evaluated for the degradation efficiency of explosives by native microorganisms under anaerobic conditions. The commercially available method Daramend®, amended with zero-valent iron (ZVI), was compared with a horse-manure amended compost and a treatment with ZVI alone. In a moderately contaminated soil, Daramend® and ZVI treatment gave significantly higher removal rates compared  to compost and control treatments (Tukey’s test, P<0.05). The largest overall decrease in ecotoxicity, measured with bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), was achieved with ZVI-treatment. In a more contaminated soil no degradation of contaminants and no decline in soil toxicity could be distinguished after the same time period. Problems with establishment of anaerobic conditions during parts of the remediation process and low microbial activity due to acute toxicity of contaminants are plausible explanations. Redistribution that could potentially lead to mobilization of the co-contaminant Pb was not observed in either of the soils during the biological treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2009
Keywords
Bioremediation, explosives, Pb, Microtox®, mixed contaminants
National Category
Natural Sciences Environmental Sciences Inorganic Chemistry
Research subject
Environmental Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5969 (URN)10.1007/s11270-009-9977-z (DOI)000269007400026 ()2-s2.0-69049092648 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-03-09 Created: 2009-03-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Holmstrom, S. J., Rosling, A., Finlay, R. D., van Hees, P. A. W. & Lundstrom, U. S. (2009). Contribution of ectomycorrhizal fungi to biogeochemical processes during iron and calcium limitation. Paper presented at 19th Annual VM Goldschmidt Conference, JUN 21, 2009, Davos, SWITZERLAND. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 73(13), A546-A546
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contribution of ectomycorrhizal fungi to biogeochemical processes during iron and calcium limitation
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2009 (English)In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 73, no 13, p. A546-A546Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28120 (URN)000267229901327 ()
Conference
19th Annual VM Goldschmidt Conference, JUN 21, 2009, Davos, SWITZERLAND
Available from: 2013-08-08 Created: 2013-03-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Elgh-Dalgren, K., Arwidsson, Z., Sjöberg, R., Allard, B., von Kronhelm, T. & van Hees, P. (2009). Effect of chemical amendments on the distribution of arsenic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a contaminated soil. In: : . Paper presented at SETAC Europe 19th Annual Meeting, Göteborg, Sweden, May 31-June 4, 2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of chemical amendments on the distribution of arsenic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a contaminated soil
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2009 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Contaminated soil, arsenic, polycyclic hydrocarbons
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42012 (URN)
Conference
SETAC Europe 19th Annual Meeting, Göteborg, Sweden, May 31-June 4, 2009
Available from: 2015-01-16 Created: 2015-01-16 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved
Elgh-Dalgren, K., Arwidsson, Z., Camdzija, A., Sjöberg, R., Ribé, V., Waara, S., . . . van Hees, P. A. W. (2009). Laboratory and pilot scale soil washing of PAH and arsenic from a wood preservation site: Changes in concentration and toxicity. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 172(2-3), 1033-1040
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Laboratory and pilot scale soil washing of PAH and arsenic from a wood preservation site: Changes in concentration and toxicity
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2009 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 172, no 2-3, p. 1033-1040Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soil washing of a soil with a mixture of both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and As was evaluated in laboratory and pilot scale, utilizing both single and mixtures of different additives. The highest level of decontamination was achieved with a combination of 0.213 M of the chelating agent MGDA and 3.2xCMC* of a nonionic, alkyl glucoside surfactant at pH 12 (Ca(OH)2). This combination managed to reach Swedish threshold values within 10 min of treat­ment when performed at elevated temperature (50°C), with initial conta­minant concentrations of As = 105±4 mg/kg and US-EPA PAH16 = 46.0±2.3 mg/kg. The main mechanisms behind the removal were the pH-effect for As and a combina­tion of SOM-ionization as a result of high pH and micellar solu­bilization for PAHs. Implementation of the laboratory results utilizing a pilot scale equipment did not improve the performance, which may be due to the shorter contact time between the washing solution and the particles, or changes in physical characte­ristics of the leaching solution due to the elevated pressure utilized. The ecotox­icological evaluation, Microtox®, demonstrated that all soil washing treatments increased the toxicity of soil leachates, possibly due to in­creased availability of contaminants and toxicity of soil washing solutions to the test organism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2009
Keywords
Arsenic, Microtox®, PAH, Soil washing, Surfactant
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7988 (URN)10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.07.092 (DOI)000271980800068 ()19699582 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-71049155866 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-09-23 Created: 2009-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, E. M., Fransson, P. M. A., Finlay, R. D. & van Hees, P. A. W. (2009). Quantitative analysis of soluble exudates produced by ectomycorrhizal roots as a response to ambient and elevated CO2. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 41(6), 1111-1116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitative analysis of soluble exudates produced by ectomycorrhizal roots as a response to ambient and elevated CO2
2009 (English)In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1111-1116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite its potential impact on soil carbon flow, few studies have attempted to quantify the effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) on production of exudates by mycorrhizal plants. In this study we quantified low molecular weight (LMW) organic compounds exuded by non-mycorrhizal (NM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) plants in relation to exposure to elevated CO2. Scots pine seedlings, either colonized by one of eight different ECM fungi or non-mycorrhizal (NM), were exposed to either ambient (350 ppm) or elevated (700 ppm) concentrations of CO2. Exudation of LMW organic acids (LMWOAs), amino acids, dissolved monosaccharides and total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was determined and exudation rates were calculated per g root and fungal dry mass. CO2 had a significant impact on exudation. Under elevated CO2, exudation of total LMWOAs increased by 120–160%, amino acids by 250%, dissolved monosaccharides by 130–270% and DOC by 180–220% compared to ambient CO2 treatment. Net CO2 assimilation rates increased significantly by 41–47% for seedlings exposed to elevated CO2. Exuded C calculated as a percentage of assimilated CO2 increased by 41–88% in the elevated CO2 treatment compared to ambient CO2 treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2009
Keywords
Ectomycorrhiza, Elevated carbon dioxide, Exudation, Glucosamine, LMWOAs, Pinus sylvestris
National Category
Natural Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11845 (URN)10.1016/j.soilbio.2009.02.016 (DOI)000266942900011 ()2-s2.0-67349288511 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-15 Created: 2010-09-15 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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