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Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
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Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Ek, K., Andershed, B., Sahlberg-Blom, E. & Britt-Marie, T. (2015). “The unpredictable death”: The last year of life for patients with advanced COPD: Relatives’ stories. Palliative & Supportive Care, 13(5), 1213-1222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“The unpredictable death”: The last year of life for patients with advanced COPD: Relatives’ stories
2015 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1213-1222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The end stage of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is described as prolonged, and the symptom burden for patients with COPD is often high. It progresses slowly over several years and can be punctuated by abrupt exacerbations that sometimes end in sudden death or a recovery of longer or shorter duration. This makes it difficult to identify the critical junctures in order to prognosticate the progress and time of death. Patients with COPD often express a fear that the dying process is going to be difficult. There is a fear that the dyspnea will worsen and lead to death by suffocation. The present article aimed to retrospectively describe the final year of life for patients with advanced COPD with a focus on death and dying from the perspective of relatives.

Method: Interviews were conducted with the relatives of deceased family members who had advanced COPD. In total, 13 interviews were conducted and analyzed by means of content analysis.

Result: All relatives described the patients as having had a peaceful death that did not correspond with the worry expressed earlier by both the patients and themselves. During the final week of life, two different patterns in the progress of the illness trajectory emerged: a temporary improvement where death was unexpected and a continued deterioration where death was inevitable.

Significance of Results: The patients and their relatives lived with uncertainty up until the time of death. Little support for psychosocial and existential needs was available. It is essential for the nurse to create relationships with patients and relatives that enable them to talk about dying and death on their own terms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, End of life, Palliative care, Oxygen therapy; Dying and death
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37808 (URN)10.1017/S1478951514001151 (DOI)000365663900007 ()25315360 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84944159938 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-16 Created: 2014-10-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ekwall, E., Ternestedt, B.-M., Sorbe, B. & Sunvisson, H. (2014). Lived experiences of women with recurring ovarian cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 18(1), 104-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lived experiences of women with recurring ovarian cancer
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 104-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Women with recurring ovarian cancer are living longer, due to advances in treatment options. They are now often outpatients, experiencing rapid encounters on treatment days. Whether this shift in care meets women’s needs has been scarcely explored scientifically.

Purpose of the study: This study aimed to illuminate the phenomenon of living with recurring ovarian cancer as experienced by women in that condition.

Methods and sample: A descriptive phenomenological method was used. Eight open-ended interviews with four women were performed approximately three and five years after the first recurrence of ovarian cancer. During these years the women had repeated clinically and radiologically verified recurrence requiring chemotherapy.

Key results:The phenomenon of living with recurring ovarian cancer meant that the women felt forced to pay attention to the failing body in order to avoid a potential breakdown. The growing limitation of their intermittent strength meant that strength had to be captured and protected. Sharing their lives with others was difficult, due to the different living conditions. The women found no space to mediate their experiences, either in close relationships or with health care professionals. But, the circumstances they lived under also generated a gratitude for the unexpected extra time.

Conclusions: The findings revealed that the four women were grateful to live a while longer, but needed to share their state of being. The findings are indeed directed to health care professionals, who need to provide a more patient-centred care to meet the women’s needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Phenomenology, Recurring ovarian cancer, Outpatient chemotherapy
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science; Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-31895 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2013.08.002 (DOI)000331859800017 ()24054734 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84893669145 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-10-11 Created: 2013-10-11 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Årestedt, K., Benzein, E., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Andershed, B. (2013). Effects of a support group programme for patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care. Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, 27(3), 257-264
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a support group programme for patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care
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2013 (English)In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Several studies show that family members report a lack of preparation, knowledge and the ability to handle the caregiver role, and a need for information and psychosocial support.

Aim: The aim was to investigate the effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care.

Design: A prospective quasi-experimental design, including an intervention group and a comparison group, was used. Settings/participants: A support group programme was offered to family members during ongoing palliative care at three intervention settings: two specialist palliative care units and one haematology unit. A fourth setting, a specialist palliative care unit, was used for comparisons.

Results: Family members taking part in the support group programme significantly increased their perceptions of preparedness for caregiving, competence for caregiving, and rewards of caregiving. Hope, anxiety, depression symptoms and health showed no significant changes.

Conclusions: The intervention, including a support group programme delivered to family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care, proved to be effective in certain domains of caregiving. No negative outcomes were detected. The results indicate that this intervention could be implemented and delivered to family members during ongoing palliative care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2013
Keywords
Palliative care, family members, intervention, support groups
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28909 (URN)10.1177/0269216312446103 (DOI)000316752200006 ()22562965 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84879741967 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Health Care Sciences Postgraduate School 

Erling-Person Family Foundation 

Signhild Engkvist Foundation 

Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-05-03 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Årestedt, K., Benzein, E., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Andershed, B. (2012). Effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care
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2012 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Several studies show that family members report lack of preparation, knowledge and ability to handle the caregiver role with a need for information and psychosocial support.

Aim: The aim was to investigate effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care

Design: A prospective quasi-experimental design including an intervention group and a comparison group was used.

Settings/participants: A support group programme was offered to family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care at three intervention settings, two specialist palliative care units and one haematology unit. A fourth setting, a specialist palliative care unit was used for comparisons.

Results: Family members taking part in the support group programme significantly increased their perceptions of preparedness for caregiving, competence for caregiving and rewards of caregiving. No significant changes were shown for hope, anxiety, depression symptoms or health.

Conclusions: The intervention, including a support group program delivered for family members of persons with life threatening illness during ongoing palliative care proved to be effective in certain domains of caregiving. No negative outcomes were detected. The results indicate that this intervention could be implemented and delivered to family members during ongoing palliative care.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22656 (URN)
Available from: 2012-04-24 Created: 2012-04-24 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Håkanson, C., Sahlberg-Blom, E., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Nyhlin, H. (2012). Learning about oneself through others: experiences of a group-based patient education programme about irritable bowel syndrome. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 26(4), 738-746
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning about oneself through others: experiences of a group-based patient education programme about irritable bowel syndrome
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 738-746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: People with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often experience severe illness-related troubles in their everyday lives. Many persons also perceive their disease-related knowledge to be insufficient, and they feel dissatisfied with their inability to improve well-being. Previous research about patient education and IBS has emphasized biomedical outcomes of symptoms, health-promoting behaviours, coping and health-related quality of life, rather than people's experiences.

Aim: To explore people's experiences of participating in a multidisciplinary group-based patient education programme about IBS and of the influence of this programme on everyday life with illness. Methods:  Focus group interviews were performed with 31 persons after their participation in the patient education programme. Interpretive description guided the inductive analysis of data. The study was approved by the local research ethics committee.

Findings: The analysis revealed four patterns; being part of a safe community, learning about oneself through others, understanding and controlling the body and illness as a whole, and being outside of the community. The pattern of learning about oneself through others can be described as a reciprocal activity of learning by listening to, telling and observing others. Being among similar others had created feelings among most of the focus group participants of being part of a safe community where taboo subjects related to IBS-symptoms could be outspoken. Understanding the body and illness as a whole had enhanced their ability to interpret bodily signals and to handle trouble some situations with greater self-confidence, and this regained their access to the social everyday world.

Conclusion: The combination of reciprocal sharing of experiences and the provision of professional scientific knowledge during the patient education programme together contributed to a growing readiness to improve well-being in everyday life, for most of the participating individuals. This was based on new understandings of the body and illness as a whole and of new abilities to make knowledge-based decisions about what strategies to use in overcoming illness-related troubles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
Chronic illness, focus groups, irritable bowel, syndrome, lived body, patient education, patient perspective, interpretive description, self-management
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24856 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.00990.x (DOI)000310791200015 ()22471714 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84869081626 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Österlind, J., Hansebo, G., Andersson, J., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Hellström, I. (2011). A discourse of silence: professional carers reasoning about death and dying in nursing homes. Ageing & Society, 31(4), 529-544
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A discourse of silence: professional carers reasoning about death and dying in nursing homes
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2011 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 529-544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nursing homes are a setting in which death and dying is common. How death and dying is articulated and the actions that take place in a nursing home constitute a discourse that guides the staff in their work. The aim of this study was to explore the discourse of death and dying in nursing homes from the perspective and understanding of the staff. The study draws on Foucault’s discourse analysis. Data are from five focus-group discussions held with 28 staff of four different nursing homes in Sweden. The findings show that the discourse had three characteristics : (a) dying was silent and silenced, (b) emotions were pushed into the background, and (c) attentiveness to death arose after the moment of the elderly person’s death. The structure of the discourse was characterised by a movement between two positions, avoiding and confronting death, the main focus being on avoidance. The articulation and practices of silence highlight a need to regard dying as a process that requires attention. One way to ensure appropriate attention could be to instil the philosophy of palliative care in nursing homes, including training and support for the staff in their work. The study demonstrates that nursing-home staff need more knowledge and support to enable them to feel that they do a good job.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2011
Keywords
older people, death and dying, nursing home, staff; focus-group discussions, discourse analysis
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-17070 (URN)10.1017/S0144686X10000905 (DOI)000289306000001 ()2-s2.0-78650980318 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-06 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Carlander, I., Ternestedt, B.-M., Sahlberg-Blom, E., Hellström, I. & Sandberg, J. (2011). Being me and being us in a family living close to death at home. Qualitative Health Research, 21(5), 683-695
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being me and being us in a family living close to death at home
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2011 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 683-695Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We used interpretive description to describe how everyday life close to death was experienced and dealt with in families with one member who had a life-threatening illness. We performed 28 individual, couple, and group interviews with five families. We found two patterns, namely, “being me in a family living close to death” and “being us in a family living close to death.” “Being me” meant that every individual in the family had to deal with the impending death, regardless of whether or not he or she was the person with the life-threatening illness. This was linked to ways of promoting the individual’s self-image, or “me-ness.” This pattern was present at the same time as the pattern of “being us,” or in other words, being a family, and dealing with impending death and a new “we-ness” as a group. “Striving for the optimal way of living close to death” was the core theme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2011
Keywords
death and dying; families; illness and disease; interpretive methods; palliative care; self; social identity
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-14755 (URN)10.1177/1049732310396102 (DOI)000289167700009 ()21263065 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80053056744 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-03-01 Created: 2011-03-01 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Widmark, C., Ternestedt, B.-M., Törnberg, S. & Tishelman, C. (2011). Between youth and adulthood: focus group discussions with 30-year-old women about cervical cancer and its prevention in urban Sweden. Cancer Nursing, 34(3), e11-e20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between youth and adulthood: focus group discussions with 30-year-old women about cervical cancer and its prevention in urban Sweden
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2011 (English)In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 34, no 3, p. e11-e20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although there is a significant amount of research on cervical cancer screening (CCS), few studies address screening experiences of women related to reasoning about health maintenance and disease prevention in general. Research tends to neglect experiences in different phases of life and experiences of women with different screening histories. Recent literature primarily focuses on adolescents targeted for human papilloma virus vaccinations, whereas perspectives of women who need continued CCS are lacking.

Objective: The aim of the study was to explore how 30-year-old women reason about health, ill health, health maintenance, and disease prevention, in relation to cervical cancer, its prevention, and screening.

Methods: Through a population-based CCS registry, we randomly sampled women to attend focus group discussions stratified by previous patterns in screening history and test results. Data from 38 attendees were inductively analyzed.

Results: Women’s discussions encompassed temporal aspects of the past and the future, with youth in the rearview mirror and the demands of adulthood ahead. Matters related to sickness, including cancer and its prevention, were described as distant and not prioritized in this phase of life. This situation was compounded by lack of relevant information about cervical cancer and screening.

Conclusions: The manner 30-year-old women self-defined themselves in the transition between youth and adulthood appears to strongly influence their reasoning about CCS and other forms of health maintenance and disease prevention.

Implications for Practice: Cervical cancer screening programs are challenged to adapt both information and organizations to new cohorts of women with different needs and life situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011
Keywords
Cervical cancer, Cervical smear, Focus group, Health, Prevention, Screening, Transition, Women, Young adult
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-17069 (URN)10.1097/NCC.0b013e3181f70f83 (DOI)000289772200002 ()20890134 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79955566503 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-06 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Carlander, I., Ternestedt, B.-M., Sahlberg-Blom, E., Hellström, I. & Sandberg, J. (2011). Four aspects of self-image close to death at home. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 6(2), Article ID 5931.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Four aspects of self-image close to death at home
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2011 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 5931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Living close to death means an inevitable confrontation with one’s own existential limitation. In this article, we argue that everyday life close to death embodies an identity work in progress. We used a narrative approach and a holistic-content reading to analyze 12 interviews conducted with three persons close to death. By illuminating the unique stories and identifying patterns among the participants’ narratives, we found four themes exemplifying important aspects of the identity work related to everyday life close to death. Two of the themes, named ‘‘Inside and outside of me’’ and ‘‘Searching for togetherness,’’ represented the core of the self-image and were framed by the other themes, ‘‘My place in space’’ and ‘‘My death and my time.’’ Our findings elucidate the way the individual stories moved between the past, the present, and the future. This study challenges the idea that everyday life close to impending death primarily means limitations. The findings show that the search for meaning, new knowledge, and community can form a part of a conscious and ongoing identity work close to death.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CoAction Publishing, 2011
Keywords
Death and dying, identity, narrative research, palliative care, qualitative inquiry, self-image
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15396 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v6i2.5931 (DOI)000290795000004 ()2-s2.0-84874984106 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-04-27 Created: 2011-04-27 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Tishelman, C., Ternestedt, B.-M., Törnberg, S., Leval, A. & Widmark, C. (2011). How can young women be encouraged to attend cervical cancer screening?: Suggestions from face-to-face and internet focus group discussions with 30-year-old women in Stockholm, Sweden. Acta Oncologica, 50(1), 112-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How can young women be encouraged to attend cervical cancer screening?: Suggestions from face-to-face and internet focus group discussions with 30-year-old women in Stockholm, Sweden
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2011 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Cervical cancer screening (CCS) using Pap-smears has been carried out for decades and is still an essential tool for secondary cancer prevention. Focus has traditionally been on what hinders women's attendance, instead of researching this issue from a positive standpoint, i.e. what factors encourage women to take a Pap-smear? In this article, we therefore explore issues that 30-year-old women have addressed as encouraging CCS attendance, with particular focus on aspects susceptible to intervention. Material and methods. Through the population-based cervical cancer screening (PCCSP) registry in Stockholm, Sweden, a stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit women from the same birth cohort with varied CCS histories and results. Nine face-to-face focus groups discussions (FGDs) and 30 internet-based FGDs were conducted with a total of 138 women aged 30. Qualitative analysis was inspired by interpretative description, to generate clinically relevant and useful data. Results. In general, these women expressed positive views about the PCCSP as an existing service, regardless of screening history. They described a wide range of factors encompassing the entire screening trajectory from invitation through follow-up which could motivate young women to CCS participation, including social marketing. Many of the suggestions related to individualization of the PCCSP, as well as a need to understand the relationship between human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Discusssion. These results are discussed in terms of the inherent tension between population-based public health initiatives and individually-oriented health care provision. Many suggestions given are already incorporated into the existing Stockholm-Gotland screening program, although this information may not reach women who need it. New research should test whether systematic information on HPV may provide a missing link in motivating young women to attend CCS, and which of their suggestions can serve to increase CCS participation.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-18804 (URN)10.3109/0284186X.2010.528790 (DOI)000285554200014 ()
Available from: 2011-09-29 Created: 2011-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
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