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König, Julia
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
König, J. & Brummer, R. J. (2018). Is an enzyme supplement for celiac disease finally on the cards?. Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is an enzyme supplement for celiac disease finally on the cards?
2018 (English)In: Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, ISSN 1747-4124, E-ISSN 1747-4132Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Expert Reviews Ltd, 2018
Keyword
Celiac disease, gluten, gluten-degrading enzymes, non-celiac gluten sensitivity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66913 (URN)10.1080/17474124.2018.1473762 (DOI)29730969 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-11 Created: 2018-05-11 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
König, J., Holster, S., Bruins, M. & Brummer, R. J. (2017). Aspergillus Niger-Derived Enzyme Degrades Gluten in the Stomach of Gluten-Sensitive Subjects. In: : . Paper presented at Digestive Disease Week (DDW), Chicago, IL, USA (May 6-9, 2017) (pp. S481). , 152, Article ID Suppl. 1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspergillus Niger-Derived Enzyme Degrades Gluten in the Stomach of Gluten-Sensitive Subjects
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66299 (URN)10.1016/S0016-5085(17)31796-1 (DOI)
Conference
Digestive Disease Week (DDW), Chicago, IL, USA (May 6-9, 2017)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-08Bibliographically approved
König, J., Siebenhaar, A., Högenauer, C., Arkkila, P., Nieuwdorp, M., Norén, T., . . . Brummer, R. J. (2017). Consensus report: Faecal microbiota transfer - clinical applications and procedures. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 45(2), 222-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consensus report: Faecal microbiota transfer - clinical applications and procedures
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2017 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 222-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Faecal microbiota transplantation or transfer (FMT) aims at replacing or reinforcing the gut microbiota of a patient with the microbiota from a healthy donor. Not many controlled or randomised studies have been published evaluating the use of FMT for other diseases than Clostridium difficile infection, making it difficult for clinicians to decide on a suitable indication.

Aim: To provide an expert consensus on current clinical indications, applications and methodological aspects of FMT.

Methods: Well-acknowledged experts from various countries in Europe have contributed to this article. After literature review, consensus has been achieved by repetitive circulation of the statements and the full manuscript among all authors with intermittent adaptation to comments (using a modified Delphi process). Levels of evidence and agreement were rated according to the GRADE system. Consensus was defined a priori as agreement by at least 75% of the authors.

Results: Key recommendations include the use of FMT in recurrent C. difficile infection characterised by at least two previous standard treatments without persistent cure, as well as its consideration in severe and severe-complicated C. difficile infection as an alternative to total colectomy in case of early failure of antimicrobial therapy. FMT in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and metabolic syndrome should only be performed in research settings.

Conclusions: Faecal microbiota transplantation or transfer is a promising treatment for a variety of diseases in which the intestinal microbiota is disturbed. For indications other than C. difficile infection, more evidence is needed before more concrete recommendations can be made.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53881 (URN)10.1111/apt.13868 (DOI)000389441900003 ()27891639 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85002170778 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Seres Therapeutics

AbbVie

Astellas

Biogen

Janssen

MSD

Mundipharma

Takeda Summit Therapeutics

FalkFoundation

Takeda

Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-12 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
König, J., Holster, S., Bruins, M. & Brummer, R. J. (2017). Effective gluten degradation in non-coeliac gluten-sensitive subjects by Aspergillus Niger derived enzyme: A placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. In: : . Paper presented at United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week, Barcelona (Oct 28-Nov 1, 2017) (pp. A28). Sage Publications, 5, Article ID OP065.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effective gluten degradation in non-coeliac gluten-sensitive subjects by Aspergillus Niger derived enzyme: A placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66300 (URN)10.1177/2050640617725668 (DOI)
Conference
United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week, Barcelona (Oct 28-Nov 1, 2017)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-08Bibliographically approved
Holster, S., Brummer, R. J., Repsilber, D. & König, J. (2017). Faecal microbiota transfer in irritable bowel syndrome – clinical outcomes of a randomised placebo- controlled trial. In: : . Paper presented at United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week, Barcelona (Oct 28-Nov 1, 2017) (pp. A155-A156).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faecal microbiota transfer in irritable bowel syndrome – clinical outcomes of a randomised placebo- controlled trial
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66283 (URN)10.1177/2050640617725668 (DOI)000403140300297 ()
Conference
United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week, Barcelona (Oct 28-Nov 1, 2017)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Holster, S., Brummer, R. J., Repsilber, D. & König, J. (2017). Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome – A randomized placebo- controlled trial. In: : . Paper presented at Digestive Disease Week (DDW), Chicago, IL, USA (May 6-9, 2017) (pp. S101-S102). , 152(5)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome – A randomized placebo- controlled trial
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66294 (URN)10.1016/S0016-5085(17)30679-0 (DOI)000403140300297 ()
Conference
Digestive Disease Week (DDW), Chicago, IL, USA (May 6-9, 2017)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
König, J., Holster, S., Maaike, B. & Brummer, R. J. (2017). Randomized clinical trial: Effective gluten degradation by Aspergillus niger-derived enzyme in a complex meal setting. Scientific Reports, 7(13100)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Randomized clinical trial: Effective gluten degradation by Aspergillus niger-derived enzyme in a complex meal setting
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 13100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Aspergillus niger-derived prolyl endoprotease (AN-PEP) has previously been shown to degrade gluten in healthy subjects when added to an intragastrically infused meal. The current study investigated the efficacy of AN-PEP in a physiological meal setting. In this randomized placebo-controlled crossover study, 18 gluten-sensitive subjects consumed a porridge containing 0.5 g gluten together with two tablets either containing a high or low dose of AN-PEP, or placebo. Gastric and duodenal content was sampled over 180 minutes, and areas under the curve of gluten concentrations were calculated. The primary outcome, i.e. success rate of high dose AN-PEP defined as at least 50% gluten degradation compared to placebo in the duodenum, was achieved in 10 of 13 comparisons. In the stomach, gluten levels were reduced from 176.9 (median, interquartile range 73.5–357.8) to 22.0 (10.6–50.8, p = 0.001) in the high dose and to 25.4 μg × min/ml (16.4–43.7, p = 0.001) in the low dose. In the duodenum, gluten levels were reduced from 14.1 (8.3–124.7) in the placebo to 6.3 (3.5–19.8, p = 0.019) in the high dose and to 7.4 μg × min/ml in the low dose (3.8–12.0, p = 0.015). Thus even in a physiological meal setting, AN-PEP significantly degraded most gluten in the stomach before it entered the duodenum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017
Keyword
Gluten
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61493 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-13587-7 (DOI)000412950900035 ()29026170 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85031294461 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

DSM

Available from: 2017-10-12 Created: 2017-10-12 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Marques, T. M., Holster, S., Wall, R., König, J. & Brummer, R. J. (2016). Correlating the gut microbiome to health and disease. In: Niall Hyland, Catherine Stanton (Ed.), The Gut-Brain Axis: Dietary, Probiotic, and Prebiotic Interventions on the Microbiota (pp. 261-291). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlating the gut microbiome to health and disease
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2016 (English)In: The Gut-Brain Axis: Dietary, Probiotic, and Prebiotic Interventions on the Microbiota / [ed] Niall Hyland, Catherine Stanton, Elsevier, 2016, p. 261-291Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The gut microbiota is a complex ecosystem consisting of a diverse population of prokaryotes that has a symbiotic relationship with its host; thus it plays a vital role for the host’s health. Our understanding of the effect of the gut microbiome in health and disease has grown substantially over the past 2 decades, mostly because of recent advances in sequencing and other high-throughput technologies. Given its high metabolic potential, close proximity to the intestinal mucosa, and interaction with the immune system, it is not surprising that the gut microbiome is an important partaker in human health. Evidence to the importance of the gut microbiome in human health and disease is the growing number of conditions now linked to changes in the resident gut microbiota, including recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, allergies, neurological diseases, and metabolic diseases. Research into this field of the association of the gut microbiome with health and disease continues to expand at a rapid pace as we come to accept the gut microbiome as our “second genome.” Targeting the gut microbiome to restore/modulate its composition with the use of antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics, and even fecal microbiota transplantation is considered a promising future strategy for the development of new solutions in the treatment of various diseases associated with an imbalance in microbiota composition and functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keyword
Gut microbiota, Immune system-related diseases, Intestinal diseases, Metabolic diseases, Nervous system-related diseases, Therapies for gut microbiota modulation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65939 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-802304-4.00012-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85011779736 (Scopus ID)978-0-12-802304-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-21 Created: 2018-03-21 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
König, J., Wells, J., Cani, P. D., García-Ródenas, C. L., MacDonald, T., Mercenier, A., . . . Brummer, R.-J. (2016). Human Intestinal Barrier Function in Health and Disease. Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, 7(10), Article ID e196.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human Intestinal Barrier Function in Health and Disease
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2016 (English)In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, ISSN 2155-384X, E-ISSN 2155-384X, Vol. 7, no 10, article id e196Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The gastrointestinal tract consists of an enormous surface area that is optimized to efficiently absorb nutrients, water, and electrolytes from food. At the same time, it needs to provide a tight barrier against the ingress of harmful substances, and protect against a reaction to omnipresent harmless compounds. A dysfunctional intestinal barrier is associated with various diseases and disorders. In this review, the role of intestinal permeability in common disorders such as infections with intestinal pathogens, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and food allergies will be discussed. In addition, the effect of the frequently prescribed drugs proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability, as well as commonly used methods to assess barrier function will be reviewed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Nature Publishing Group, 2016
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53247 (URN)10.1038/ctg.2016.54 (DOI)000391816200003 ()27763627 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

ILSI Europe Probiotics Task Force

Available from: 2016-10-25 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
König, J., Ganda-Mall, J.-P., Rangel, I., Edebol-Carlman, H. & Brummer, R. J. (2015). The Role of the Gut Microbiota in Brain Function. In: Koen Venema & Ana Paula do Carmo (Ed.), Probiotics and Prebiotics: Current Research and Future Trends. Poole, UK: Caister Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of the Gut Microbiota in Brain Function
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2015 (English)In: Probiotics and Prebiotics: Current Research and Future Trends / [ed] Koen Venema & Ana Paula do Carmo, Poole, UK: Caister Academic Press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Poole, UK: Caister Academic Press, 2015
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39860 (URN)978-1-910190-09-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
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