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Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Skagerstrand, Å. (2019). Signal processing to ease of listening effort for persons with profound hearing loss. In: : . Paper presented at Aging & Speech Communication International Meeting 2019, Tampa, Florida, USA, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Signal processing to ease of listening effort for persons with profound hearing loss
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-81945 (URN)
Conference
Aging & Speech Communication International Meeting 2019, Tampa, Florida, USA, 2019
Available from: 2020-05-19 Created: 2020-05-19 Last updated: 2020-05-19Bibliographically approved
Skagerstrand, Å. (2018). Perception of disturbing sounds: Investigations of people with hearing loss and normal hearing. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perception of disturbing sounds: Investigations of people with hearing loss and normal hearing
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present thesis concerns the daily sound environment and the human perception of the same. The sound environment affects the possibility to be active in a communication. With background noise, it may be harder to hear desired signals, and when suffering from a hearing loss, negative effects of the background noise increase. Previous research has explored, that persons with hearing loss benefit from hearing aid usage, but there is a risk of non-usage due to low sound quality. The non-usage of hearing aids has furthermore been described as a cause of isolation and social withdrawal for persons with hearing loss.

The general aim of the present thesis is to explore the concept of disturbing sounds in a daily sound environment and to examine the influence of hearing loss and hearing aid usage. Disturbing sounds were investigated in means of perception of loudness and annoyance, where loudness concerned the acoustical properties, mainly sound level, whereas annoyance concerned the psychological phenomenon, defined as an individual adverse reaction to noise. The results of studies I and II showed, that hearing aid users experience disturbing sounds more or less daily, and that those sounds resulted in a decreased usage of hearing aids. The effect of disturbing sounds seemed to rely on several factors, acoustical as well as psychological, and there was not one single factor providing a full explanation of disturbance. In study III and IV, the perception of sounds in normal hearing and hearing impaired persons were thoroughly examined and revealed that hearing thresholds affect the perceived loudness and annoyance. Furthermore, the effect of hearing aids on loudness and annoyance perception was investigated. The results showed that hearing aids restored the loudness and annoyance to levels comparable to people with normal hearing function. The results of the studies stress that additional research should focus on the implementation of knowledge of disturbing sounds in audiological rehabilitation, in order to increase the benefit of hearing aid usage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2018. p. 77
Series
Studies from The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 89
Keywords
perception, annoyance, loudness, hearing loss
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64133 (URN)978-91-7529-229-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-03-09, Örebro universitet, Prismahuset, Hörsal 1, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Skagerstrand, Å., Köbler, S. & Stenfelt, S. (2017). Loudness and annoyance of disturbing sounds: perception by normal hearing subjects. International Journal of Audiology, 56(10), 775-783
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loudness and annoyance of disturbing sounds: perception by normal hearing subjects
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 775-783Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Sounds in the daily environment may cause loudness and annoyance. The present study investigated the perception of loudness and annoyance for eight different sounds present in a daily sound environment and at nine different levels varying by ±20 dB around the recorded level. The outcomes were related to tests of participants' auditory and cognitive abilities.

DESIGN: The participants undertook auditory and working memory (WM) tests prior to ratings of everyday sounds previously shown to be disturbing for persons with hearing impairment (hearing aid users).

STUDY SAMPLE: Twenty-one participants aged between 24 and 71 years, with normal hearing threshold levels.

RESULTS: Both perceived loudness and annoyance were primarily driven by the sound level. Sounds emitted from paper were rated as having greater loudness and being more annoying than the other sound sources at the same sound level. Auditory and cognitive abilities did not influence the perception of loudness and annoyance.

CONCLUSIONS: Loudness and annoyance ratings were mainly driven by sound level. Expectations of a sound seemed to influence the assessment of loudness and annoyance while auditory performance and WM capacity showed no influence on the ratings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Psychoacoustics/hearing science; noise; psycho-social/emotional; behavioural measures
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60890 (URN)10.1080/14992027.2017.1321790 (DOI)000416642900009 ()28485649 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019114085 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Skagerstrand, Å. (2017). Perception in normal hearing subjects. In: : . Paper presented at 4th International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, Sweden, 18-21 June, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perception in normal hearing subjects
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73805 (URN)
Conference
4th International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, Sweden, 18-21 June, 2017
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Rudner, M., Dahlström, Ö., Skagerstrand, Å., Alvinzi, L., Thunberg, P., Sörqvist, P., . . . Möller, C. (2016). Does working memory training improve speech recognition in noise?. In: : . Paper presented at Neural Plasticity Workshop: Insights from Deafness and Language, London, UK, June 3-4, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does working memory training improve speech recognition in noise?
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Listening to speech in noise is often reported to be effortful, especially for individuals with hearing impairment, and many studies have shown that the ability to recognize speech in noise is positively associated with working memory capacity. We reasoned that if working memory capacity could be increased by training this might improve the ability to recognize speech in noise and modulate the neural activation associated with it. Adults with normal (NH) and impaired hearing (HI) were randomized to five weeks of CogMed QM training followed by five weeks of no training, or vice versa, according to a crossover design. Auditory and cognitive abilities were tested on four occasions: pre-training, T1; after 5 weeks, T2; after 10 weeks, T3 and after a further six months, T4. During fMRI scanning at T1, T2 and T3, the participants listened to stereotyped matrix type sentences in pink noise and competing talker noise at individually adapted 50% and 90% intelligibility levels as well as in quiet. Behavioural results show that although HI had worse auditory abilities than NH, there was no significant difference in cognitive ability, with the exception of phonological processing, which tended to be slower (cf Classon et al. 2013). Performance on most of cognitive tasks improved across sessions, although this could not be specifically attributed to training. We found no consistent pattern of correlations between working memory and the ability to understand speech in noise either before or after training. fMRI results did not reveal any significant effect of training and furthermore there was no significant effect of hearing status. However, there was a significant between group difference in activation of the left temporal gyrus (-44 -23 10) for the contrast speech in pink noise (across intelligibility levels) vs clear speech. There was also an interaction (p < .001 uncorrected) between group and testing occasion in the right superior frontal gyrus (7 58 16) for the contrast speech in noise (across types and levels) vs clear speech. Further, activation in left superior temporal gyrus (-56 -20 -2) correlated more strongly with intelligibility in NH compared HI participants.

These results suggest that even when cognitive abilities are matched and intelligibility is individually adjusted, there are differences relating to hearing impairment in the neural mechanisms supporting speech in noise processing. The pattern of results suggests hearing-related differences in bottom-up processing mechanisms across time and hearing-related differences in top-down mechanisms that change over time. However, we found no evidence that working memory training improves speech recognition in noise.

References:Classon, E., Rudner, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2013). Working memory compensates for hearing relatedphonological processing deficit. Journal of Communication Disorders, 46, 17-29.doi:10.1016/j.jcomdis.2012.10.001CogMed QM, developed by CogMed Cognitive Medical Systems AB, Stockholm, Sweden, 2006

National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63445 (URN)
Conference
Neural Plasticity Workshop: Insights from Deafness and Language, London, UK, June 3-4, 2016
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved
Skagerstrand, Å., Lyxell, B., Thunberg, P., Sörqvist, P., Lundin, M., Johnsrude, I., . . . Möller, C. (2015). Cognitive training and effects on speech-in noise performance in normal hearing and hearing impaired individuals. In: CHSCOM2015: Abstract book. Paper presented at Third international conference on cognitive hearing science for communication (CHSCOM2015), Linköping, Sweden, June 14-17, 2015 (pp. 127-127). Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive training and effects on speech-in noise performance in normal hearing and hearing impaired individuals
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2015 (English)In: CHSCOM2015: Abstract book, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015, p. 127-127Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive training might have potential to improve speech understanding under adverse listening conditions. Here, we have examined the effects of a 5-week computer-based cognitive training program on speech-in-noise-performance, in normal hearing (NH) participants and in participants with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (HI).

Two groups, matched on gender and age (45-65 years), of 20 participants each (HI and NH respectively) are recruited. Participants perform four test-sessions; inclusion (t0), five weeks (t1), ten weeks (t2) and six months (t3). Training is performed either between t0 and t1, or between t1 and t2 (using a cross-over design), using the computer-based Cogmed training program, approximately 30-40 minutes per day, five days per week, during five weeks. At each session participants are tested in three different ways: (a) cognitive testing (KIPS, SICSPAN, TRT); (b) auditory performance (pure tone-audiometry (air- and bone-conduction) and speech audiometry (HINT, Swedish SPIN-test (SNR +4dB))); (c) cortical activation (MR sessions where participants performed a speech-in-noise task using Hagerman-sentences with steady-state speech-spectrum noise (SSN) and with two competing talkers). MR imaging is performed on a Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla scanner using a sparse imaging technique in which stimuli are presented during the silent period between successive scans. Participants listen to auditory stimuli under eight different conditions: clear speech, SSN or two competing talkers (each at 90%, 50% and 0% intelligibility), and silent rest. Pre- and post-training, hearing disability is assessed by the Speech-Spatial-Qualities-Questionnaire.

The study is on-going and behavioral results as well as results from fMRI will be presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63499 (URN)
Conference
Third international conference on cognitive hearing science for communication (CHSCOM2015), Linköping, Sweden, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, P.-I., Hjaldahl, J., Magnuson, A., Ternevall, E., Edén, M., Skagerstrand, Å. & Jönsson, R. (2014). Severe to profound hearing impairment: quality of life, psychosocial consequences and audiological rehabilitation. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(20), 1849-1856
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Severe to profound hearing impairment: quality of life, psychosocial consequences and audiological rehabilitation
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2014 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 20, p. 1849-1856Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To study the quality of life (QoL) and psychosocial consequences in terms of sick leave and audiological rehabilitation given to patients with severe to profound hearing impairment.

Method: A retrospective study of data on 2319 patients with severe to profound hearing impairment in The Swedish Quality Register of Otorhinolaryngology, followed by a posted questionnaire including The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). 

Results: The results indicate greater levels of anxiety and depression among patients with severe or profound hearing impairment than in the general population, and annoying tinnitus and vertigo had strong negative effects on QoL. The proportion of sick leave differed between the studied dimensions in the study. The proportion of patients who received extended audiological rehabilitation was 38% in the present study. 

Conclusions: Treatment focused on anxiety, depression, tinnitus and vertigo must be given early in the rehabilitation process in patients with severe or profound hearing impairment. Because sick leave differs greatly within this group of patients, collaboration with the regional Social Insurance Agency is crucial part of the rehabilitation. The study also shows that presently, only a small proportion of patients in Sweden with severe to profound hearing impairment receive extended audiological rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation

  • Greater levels of anxiety and depression have been found among patients with severe or profound hearing impairment than in the general population, and annoying tinnitus and vertigo have strong negative effects on QoL in this group of patients.

  • Only a small proportion of patients with severe to profound hearing impairment receive extended audiological rehabilitation today, including medical, technical and psychosocial efforts.

  • Extended audiological rehabilitation focused on anxiety, depression, tinnitus and vertigo must be given, together with technical rehabilitation, early in the rehabilitation process in patients with severe or profound hearing impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis, 2014
Keywords
EuroQoL 5D, sick leave, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, the problems impact rating scale, tinnitus, vertigo
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39690 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.982833 (DOI)000361330300007 ()25391816 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84939812063 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Regional Research Council in Uppsala - Örebro

Hearing Foundation in Sweden

Available from: 2014-12-15 Created: 2014-12-15 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Skagerstrand, Å., Stenfelt, S., Arlinger, S. & Wikström, J. (2014). Sounds perceived as annoying by hearing-aid users in their daily soundscape. International Journal of Audiology, 53(4), 259-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sounds perceived as annoying by hearing-aid users in their daily soundscape
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 259-269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The noises in modern soundscapes continue to increase and are a major origin for annoyance. For a hearing-impaired person, a hearing aid is often beneficial, but noise and annoying sounds can result in non-use of the hearing aid, temporary or permanently.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify annoying sounds in a daily soundscape for hearing-aid users.

Design: A diary was used to collect data where the participants answered four questions per day about annoying sounds in the daily soundscape over a two-week period.

Study sample: Sixty adult hearing-aid users. Results: Of the 60 participants 91% experienced annoying sounds daily when using hearing aids. The annoying sound mentioned by most users, was verbal human sounds, followed by other daily sound sources categorized into 17 groups such as TV/radio, vehicles, and machine tools. When the hearing-aid users were grouped in relation to age, hearing loss, gender, hearing-aid experience, and type of signal processing used in their hearing aids, small and only few significant differences were found when comparing their experience of annoying sounds.

Conclusions: The results indicate that hearing-aid users often experience annoying sounds and improved clinical fitting routines may reduce the problem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Soundscape, annoying sounds, hearing aid, hearing-aid fitting
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34849 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2013.876108 (DOI)000332867100007 ()24495276 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84896353214 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-04-28 Created: 2014-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Granberg, S., Möller, K., Skagerstrand, Å., Möller, C. & Danermark, B. (2014). The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). International Journal of Audiology, 53(2), 77-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 77-87Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective.

Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported.

Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment.

Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Hearing loss, audiology, ICF, linking, ICF core sets
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33755 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2013.858279 (DOI)000329834600002 ()24329490 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892619855 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Oticon Foundation  

Stinger Foundation

Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E., Sullivan, K., Zetterholm, E., Czigler, P., Green, J., Skagerstrand, Å. & van Doorn, J. (2010). Detection of imitated voices: who are reliable earwitnesses?. The international journal of speech language and the law, 17(1), 25-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of imitated voices: who are reliable earwitnesses?
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2010 (English)In: The international journal of speech language and the law, ISSN 1748-8885, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Factors affecting an individual's ability to identify people aurally are of forensic importance. This paper investigates how topic, dialect, gender, age, and hearing status affect detection of an imitated voice. Two imitations of the same person, but on different topics, were used as familiarization voices. One topic was associated with this person, and the other was not. Using discrimination sensitivity (d-prime) it was found that topic had a significant impact on d', as did age (but only when the topic was not associated with the imitated person). Dialect, gender and hearing status were not significant. The older group of listeners was less convinced by the imitations and in particular the one not associated with the person being imitated. These results imply that the validity of earwitness evidence is negatively affected by age and topic.

Keywords
earwitness, reliability, hearing, age, dialect, imitation
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Sociology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12919 (URN)10.1558/ijsll.v17i1.25 (DOI)000279892500002 ()
Available from: 2011-01-04 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2018-04-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9799-8844

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