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Angelstam, Per
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Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Angelstam, P., Andersson, K., Isacson, M., Gavrilov, D. V., Axelsson, R., Bäckström, M., . . . Törnblom, J. (2013). Learning about the history of landscape use for the future: consequences for ecological and social systems in Swedish Bergslagen. Ambio, 42(2), 146-159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning about the history of landscape use for the future: consequences for ecological and social systems in Swedish Bergslagen
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2013 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 146-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Barriers and bridges to implement policies about sustainable development and sustainability commonly depend on the past development of social-ecological systems. Production of metals required integration of use of ore, streams for energy, and wood for bioenergy and construction, as well as of multiple societal actors. Focusing on the Swedish Bergslagen region as a case study we (1) describe the phases of natural resource use triggered by metallurgy, (2) the location and spatial extent of 22 definitions of Bergslagen divided into four zones as a proxy of cumulative pressure on landscapes, and (3) analyze the consequences for natural capital and society. We found clear gradients in industrial activity, stream alteration, and amount of natural forest from the core to the periphery of Bergslagen. Additionally, the legacy of top-down governance is linked to today's poorly diversified business sector and thus municipal vulnerability. Comparing the Bergslagen case study with other similar regions in Russia and Germany, we discuss the usefulness of multiple case studies.

Keywords
Environmental history, Forest, Water, Mining, Regional studies, Sustainable development
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28906 (URN)10.1007/s13280-012-0369-z (DOI)000316115800004 ()
Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-05-03 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Törnblom, J., Angelstam, P., Degerman, E., Henrikson, L., Edman, T. & Temnerud, J. (2011). Catchment land cover as a proxy for macroinvertebrate assemblage structure in Carpathian Mountain streams. Hydrobiologia, 673(1), 153-168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catchment land cover as a proxy for macroinvertebrate assemblage structure in Carpathian Mountain streams
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2011 (English)In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 673, no 1, p. 153-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We compared land cover, riparian vegetation, and instream habitat characteristics with stream macroinvertebrate assemblages in 25 catchments in the Carpathian Mountains in Central Europe. This study area was particularly selected because of its diverse history of forest and agricultural ecosystems linked to geopolitical dynamic, which provide a suite of unique landscape scale, land cover settings in one ecoregion. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) showed that variation in composition and structure of macroinvertebrate assemblages was primarily related to four land cover types, and not to riparian or instream habitat. These were the portions in the catchment areas of (1) broadleaved forest, (2) fine-grained agricultural landscape mosaic with scattered trees (e. g., pre-industrial cultural landscape), (3) mixed forest, and (4) natural grassland without trees. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) suggested that land cover types and stream channel substrates co-varied. The PCA also showed that chemical variables, including organic carbon, had higher values in the agricultural landscape compared to natural forests. The major source of variation among taxa in streams was higher abundance of Diptera in agricultural landscapes and of Plecoptera, Coleoptera, Trichoptera, and Amphipoda in forests. Gastropoda and Oligochaeta were more abundant in open, fine-grained agricultural landscape mosaics with scattered trees. Ephemeroptera taxa were quite indifferent to these gradients in catchment land cover, but showed a tendency of being more abundant in the pre-industrial cultural landscape. Our findings suggest that land cover can be used as a proxy of the composition and structure of macroinvertebrate assemblages. This means that land use management at the catchment scale is needed for efficient conservation and recovery of stream invertebrate communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2011
Keywords
Land use, Land cover, European Water Framework Directive, Macroinvertebrates, Ecological integrity
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-17024 (URN)10.1007/s10750-011-0769-2 (DOI)000293162400012 ()2-s2.0-79960563277 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-07 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Angelstam, P., Mikusinski, G., Rönnbäck, B.-I., Östman, A., Lazdinis, M., Roberge, J.-M., . . . Olsson, J. (2003). Two-dimensional gap analysis: a tool for efficient conservation planning and biodiversity policy implementation. Ambio, 32(8), 527-534
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two-dimensional gap analysis: a tool for efficient conservation planning and biodiversity policy implementation
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2003 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 527-534Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The maintenance of biodiversity by securing representative and well-connected habitat networks in managed landscapes requires a wise combination of protection, management, and restoration of habitats at several scales. We suggest that the integration of natural and social sciences in the form of "Two-dimensional gap analysis" is an efficient tool for the implementation of biodiversity policies. The tool links biologically relevant "horizontal" ecological issues with "vertical" issues related to institutions and other societal issues. Using forest biodiversity as an example, we illustrate how one can combine ecological and institutional aspects of biodiversity conservation, thus facilitating environmentally sustainable regional development. In particular, we use regional gap analysis for identification of focal forest types, habitat modelling for ascertaining the functional connectivity of "green infrastructures", as tools for the horizontal gap analysis. For the vertical dimension we suggest how the social sciences can be used for assessing the success in the implementation of biodiversity policies in real landscapes by identifying institutional obstacles while implementing policies. We argue that this interdisciplinary approach could be applied in a whole range of other environments including other terrestrial biota and aquatic ecosystems where functional habitat connectivity, nonlinear response to habitat loss and a multitude of economic and social interests co-occur in the same landscape.

National Category
Political Science Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Political Science; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38789 (URN)000189317900006 ()15049349 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-0347567245 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-11-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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