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Trost, Kari
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Thomas, S., Ferrer-Wreder, L., Eninger, L., Smedler, A.-C., Trost, K. & Domitrovich, C. (2013). Early Childhood Social Emotional Competence and Adjustment: Disentangling Immigant and Socioeconomic Status. In: : . Paper presented at ECP 2013, The 13th European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden 9-12 July 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Childhood Social Emotional Competence and Adjustment: Disentangling Immigant and Socioeconomic Status
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Keywords
Prevention, Promotion, Preschool, Developmental, Longitudinal, Cultural adaptation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34703 (URN)
Conference
ECP 2013, The 13th European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden 9-12 July 2013
Available from: 2014-04-10 Created: 2014-04-10 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved
Kormi-Nouri, R., Farahani, M.-N. & Trost, K. (2013). The role of positive and negative affect on well-being amongst Swedish and Iranian university students. Journal of Positive Psychology, 8(5), 435-443
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of positive and negative affect on well-being amongst Swedish and Iranian university students
2013 (English)In: Journal of Positive Psychology, ISSN 1743-9760, E-ISSN 1743-9779, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 435-443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The roles of positive and negative affect in well-being were studied in two different societies, namely the Iranian and the Swedish. A total of 606 university students (296 Iranian and 310 Swedish) participated in the study. The results showed that, whereas there was no difference between Iranian and Swedish participants in their general level of life satisfaction, differences with regard to positive and negative affect were found. Swedish participants had more positive affect, whereas Iranian participants had more negative affect. In the Swedish sample, the most predictive factor of flourishing was positive affect, while there was a balance affect (between positive and negative affects) in the Iranian sample. The results are discussed from a individualistic-collectivistic perspective.

Keywords
flourishing, well-being, positive affect, negative affect, cross-cultural, individualistic, collectivistic
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-30724 (URN)10.1080/17439760.2013.823511 (DOI)000322947000008 ()
Available from: 2013-09-09 Created: 2013-09-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ferrer-Wreder, L., Trost, K., Lorente, C. C. & Mansoory, S. (2012). Personal and ethnic identity in Swedish adolescents and emerging adults. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 138, 61-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personal and ethnic identity in Swedish adolescents and emerging adults
2012 (English)In: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, ISSN 1520-3247, E-ISSN 1534-8687, Vol. 138, p. 61-86Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The chapter describes empirical evidence about identity development in Swedish adolescents and emerging adults and highlights cultural and contextual influences that may be specific to coming of age in Sweden. Broad trends in identity options are evident in the lives of many youth living in Sweden. Although research on identity and diversity is in its infancy in Sweden, due at least in part to its tradition of longitudinal research, its contribution to understanding advances in adolescent-parent and peer relations, and its contributions to developmental interactionist metatheories of human development, the country has the potential to forge a new generation of identity research that takes into account the ongoing process of person-environment interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2012
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28970 (URN)10.1002/cad.20022 (DOI)000322313800004 ()23225354 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84870665669 (Scopus ID)978-1-118-54411-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-05-06 Last updated: 2018-05-12Bibliographically approved
Tilton-Weaver, L. & Trost, K. (2012). Privacy in the family: adolescents’ views on their needs and their parents’ behaviors. In: : . Paper presented at European Association for Research on Adolescence, Spetses, Greece, August 29 - September 1, 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Privacy in the family: adolescents’ views on their needs and their parents’ behaviors
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28484 (URN)
Conference
European Association for Research on Adolescence, Spetses, Greece, August 29 - September 1, 2012
Available from: 2013-03-26 Created: 2013-03-26 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Trost, K. (2012). Sweden. In: Jeffrey Jensen Arnett (Ed.), Adolescent psychology around the world: (pp. 335-350). New York: Psychology Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden
2012 (English)In: Adolescent psychology around the world / [ed] Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, New York: Psychology Press, 2012, p. 335-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Psychology Press, 2012
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology; Public health; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34697 (URN)9781848728899 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-04-10 Created: 2014-04-10 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Trost, K. (2011). Sweden. In: Jeffrey Jensen Arnett (Ed.), Adolescent psychology around the world: (pp. 335-352). Howe: Psychology Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden
2011 (English)In: Adolescent psychology around the world / [ed] Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, Howe: Psychology Press, 2011, p. 335-352Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Howe: Psychology Press, 2011
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-13754 (URN)1-84872-888-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-01-13 Created: 2011-01-13 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Trost, K. (2009). Psst, have you ever cheated?: A study of academic dishonesty in Sweden. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 34(4), 367-376
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psst, have you ever cheated?: A study of academic dishonesty in Sweden
2009 (English)In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 367-376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been reported that academic dishonesty is a prevalent problem that crosses all disciplines at the university level. But, how prevalent is it in Sweden? Little is published in the literature about lying, cheating, and plagiarism amongst Swedish university students. This paper focuses on the frequency of past specific academically dishonest behaviours amongst Swedish University students with consideration to social desirability. The results indicate that although there are variations in frequency of dishonest behaviours amongst university students, some dishonest behaviours are more common than others. Future perspectives are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2009
Keywords
academic dishonesty, university students, cheating, plagiarism
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-13201 (URN)10.1080/02602930801956067 (DOI)000270904300001 ()2-s2.0-79955563438 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-12 Created: 2011-01-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Tillfors, M., El-Khouri, B., Stein, M. B. & Trost, K. (2009). Relationships between social anxiety, depressive symptoms, and antisocial behaviors: Evidence from a prospective study of adolescent boys. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23(5), 718-724
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between social anxiety, depressive symptoms, and antisocial behaviors: Evidence from a prospective study of adolescent boys
2009 (English)In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 718-724Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is understood about generalized and non-generalized social anxiety disorder (SAD) and their associations with co-occurring internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescence. In the present study, we investigated adolescent boys with SAD symptoms and considered depressive symptoms as well as antisocial behaviors when looking for patterns during two developmental time periods; junior high and high school. Participants in the analyses were part of a longitudinal study. No patterns were found linking antisocial problems and non-generalized SAD in either junior high or high school. Furthermore, it was uncommon for youths in the non-generalized SAD subgroup to develop comorbidity over time. The generalized SAD subgroup of boys, however, was likely to develop comorbidity either with depressive symptoms only or with depressive symptoms and antisocial tendencies. Our findings suggest that developmental pathways for SAD subgroups may differ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2009
National Category
Psychology Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5779 (URN)10.1016/j.janxdis.2009.02.011 (DOI)000265657700021 ()19304451 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-64249147328 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Forskningsrådet för arbetsliv och socialvetenskap (FAS/Dnr: 2006-0852)
Available from: 2009-02-19 Created: 2009-02-19 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Trost, K. & El-Khouri, B. M. (2008). Mapping swedish females' educational pathways in terms of academic competence and adjustment problems. Journal of Social Issues, 64(1), 157-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping swedish females' educational pathways in terms of academic competence and adjustment problems
2008 (English)In: Journal of Social Issues, ISSN 0022-4537, E-ISSN 1540-4560, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 157-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patterns of academic competence, externalizing problems, and internalizing problems were examined in females from the longitudinal Individual Development and Adaptation (IDA) program in order to understand unexpected patterns of educational attainment and problems in adulthood. Person-oriented methods were used to identify patterns of competence and problems at ages 10, 13, and 43. These patterns were linked across time to reveal expected and unexpected educational pathways from childhood to adulthood. Most later patterns were consistent with earlier patterns of competence and problems. This structural-level stability supported our hypothesis that competence and problems tend to be inversely related and function together over time as integrated systems. We focus on one unexpected educational pathway characterized by individuals whose problems remain low over time despite stable levels of low competence. This unexpected educational pathway was examined further in terms of optimal versus general adjustment consequences in adulthood. Some policy implications of studying individual patterns and pathways are discussed.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-19701 (URN)10.1111/j.1540-4560.2008.00553.x (DOI)000253043500009 ()
Available from: 2011-10-06 Created: 2011-10-06 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Trost, K., Biesecker, G., Stattin, H. & Kerr, M. (2007). Not wanting parents' involvement: Sign of autonomy or sign of problems?. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 4(3), 314-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Not wanting parents' involvement: Sign of autonomy or sign of problems?
2007 (English)In: European Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 1740-5629, E-ISSN 1740-5610, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 314-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study investigated whether adolescents' desires to manage their own free time, without parents' involvement, reflected problems or healthy independence. Participants were 1057 adolescents, their parents, and teachers. Initially, wanting parental involvement was related to disclosure, parental knowledge, and positive adjustment across contexts and wanting low parental involvement was related to negative adjustment. With closer examination of adolescents, two groups of adolescents who were similar on desires for low parental involvement but who differed on parental desires for involvement were uncovered. Those adolescents who wanted low parental involvement and whose parents desired involvement were consistently linked to poor adjustment in multicontexts. Those adolescents who wanted low parental involvement and whose parents wanted low parental involvement did not have more problems than their wanting parental involvement peers. Results indicate that not wanting parental involvement should be studied in terms of multiple developmental patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis, 2007
Keywords
Adolescent Attitudes, Independence (Personality), Leisure Time, Parental Involvement, Time Management
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6523 (URN)10.1080/17405620601008980 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-05-04 Created: 2009-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
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