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Carlsson, Ing-Marie
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Carlsson, I.-M., Ziegert, K. & Nissen, E. (2014). Psychometric properties of the Swedish childbirth self-efficacy inventory (Swe-CBSEI). BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 14, 1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric properties of the Swedish childbirth self-efficacy inventory (Swe-CBSEI)
2014 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 14, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous research has reported that women who are admitted to delivery wards in early labour process before an active stage of labour has started run an increased risk of instrumental deliveries. Therefore, it is essential to focus on factors such as self-efficacy that can enhance a woman's own ability to cope with the first stage of labour. However, there was no Swedish instrument measuring childbirth self-efficacy available. Thus, the aim of the study was to translate the Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory and to psychometrically test the Swedish version on first-time mothers within the Swedish culture. Methods: The method included a forward-backward translation with face and content validity. The psychometric properties were evaluated using a Principal Component Analysis and by using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and inter-item correlations. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were used to describe and compare the scales. All data were collected from January 2011 to June 2012, from 406 pregnant women during the gestational week 35-42. Results: The Swedish version of the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory indicated good reliability and the Principal Component Analysis showed a three-component structure. The Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Test indicated that the women could differentiate between the concepts outcome expectancy and self-efficacy expectatancy and between the two labour stages, active stage and the second stage of labour. Conclusions: The Swedish version of Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory is a reliable and valid instrument. The inventory can act as a tool to identify those women who need extra support and to evaluate the efforts of improving women's self-efficacy during pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Childbirth, Self-efficacy, Instrument development, Psychometric properties, Principal component analysis, Think aloud, Midwifery
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34271 (URN)10.1186/1471-2393-14-1 (DOI)000331213400001 ()
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-13 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, I.-M., Ziegert, K., Sahlberg-Blom, E. & Nissen, E. (2012). Maintaining power: women's experiences from labour onset before admittance to maternity ward. Midwifery, 28(1), 86-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining power: women's experiences from labour onset before admittance to maternity ward
2012 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: in Sweden pregnant women are encouraged to remain at home until the active phase of labour. Recommendation is based on evidence, that women who seek care and are admitted in the latent phase of labour are subjected to more obstetric interventions and suffer more complications than women who remain at home until the active phase of labour. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of how women, who remain at home until the active phase of labour, experience the period from labour onset until admission to labour ward.

Method: interviews were conducted with 19 women after they had given birth to their first child. A Constructivist Grounded theory method was used.

Findings: ‘Maintaining power’ was identified as the core category, explaining the women's experience of having enough power, when the labour started. Four related categories: ‘to share the experience with another’, ‘to listen to the rhythm of the body’, ‘to distract oneselfand ‘to be encased in a glass vessel’, explained how the women coped and thereby maintained power.

Conclusions: the first time mothers in this study, who managed to stay at home during the latent phase of labour, had a sense of power that was expressed as a driving force towards the birth, a bodily and mental strength and the right to decide over their own bodies. This implies that women who maintain power have the ability to make choices during the birth process. The professionals need to be sensitive, supportive and respectful to women's own preferences in the health-care encounter, to promote the existing power throughout the birthing process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Experiences, grounded theory, labour onset, maintaining power
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-14078 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2010.11.011 (DOI)000299324500013 ()21237538 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84855931014 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-19 Created: 2011-01-19 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved

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