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Redmalm, David
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Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Redmalm, D. (2014). Holy bonsai wolves: chihuahuas and the Paris Hilton syndrome. International journal of cultural studies, 17(1), 93-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holy bonsai wolves: chihuahuas and the Paris Hilton syndrome
2014 (English)In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 93-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the reasons for the Chihuahua breed’s popularity in contemporary westernsociety by looking at two sets of data: Chihuahua handbooks and The Simple Life show, starringParis Hilton and her Chihuahua Tinkerbell. The article argues that the Chihuahua is a holy anomaly:a creature which can be used in myths and rituals to temporarily alleviate the tension-filled binaryoppositions and stereotypes inherent in a particular culture, in order to celebrate and reinforcethat culture’s categories and social order. The Chihuahua – or the bonsai wolf – transcendstwo binary oppositions fundamental to contemporary westerners: subject/object and nature/culture. Although the Chihuahua challenges a number of related binary oppositions, it is generallydismissed as a matter for humor, low-brow entertainment or expressions of sentimentality,rendering ritual encounters with Chihuahuas harmless. The article concludes by asking: whatwould happen if humans actually started listening to what the Chihuahua is telling them?

Keywords
animal–human relations, anomalies, binary oppositions, chihuahuas, dichotomies, dogs, Donna Haraway, Paris Hilton, hudographies, humor, popular culture
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32185 (URN)10.1177/1367877912464539 (DOI)000328600100006 ()
Available from: 2013-10-29 Created: 2013-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2013). An animal without an animal within: investigating the identities of pet keeping. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An animal without an animal within: investigating the identities of pet keeping
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

If the human is an animal without an animal within—a creature that has transcended the animal condition—what is a pet? This creature balancing on the border between nature and culture, simultaneously included in and excluded from a human “we”, is the focus of this thesis. The thesis analyzes the discourses and normative frameworks structuring the meaning of pets in people’s lives. By extension, it analyzes how the boundary between “human” and “animal” is produced, negotiated, and challenged in the relationship between pet and owner.

Each of this thesis’ four constituent studies focuses on an aspect of personal relationships between humans and pets: pets as figures for philosophical thinking, the dual role of pets as commodities and companions, the grief for lost pets, and the power issues at play in the everyday life of pet and owner. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s genealogical approach, crossbred with Donna Haraway’s material-semiotic perspective, the analysis exposes the powers allowing pets to occupy these various positions.

The thesis demonstrates that pets occupy a special position as boundary creatures in the lives of humans, allowing humans to play with and thus reproduce dichotomies inherent to the contemporary Western worldview, such as human/animal, person/nonperson, subject/object, and friend/commodity. However, pets’ conceptual transgressions may also challenge this worldview. On the one hand, pets are bought and sold as commodities, but on the other, they are widely included in the human sphere as friends or family members. This paradoxical position is accentuated in the construction of a more-than-human home, and it is also visible when pets pass away. This thesis argues that pets, these anomalous creatures, may help humans understand that there are no humans or animals within, only relations between them. Based on this argument, this thesis develops a sociological approach for analyzing the production of humanity and animality in relations between humans and other animals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2013. p. 119
Series
Örebro Studies in Sociology, ISSN 1650-2531 ; 17
Keywords
animal studies, animality, anomalies, companion animals, Michel Foucault, Donna Haraway, human-animal studies, materialsemiotics, pets, posthumanism
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29323 (URN)978-91-7668-971-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-11-15, HSF, Hörsal F, Forumhuset, Örebro universitet, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-06-04 Created: 2013-06-04 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2011). Christian Abrahamsson, Fredrik Palm, Sverre Wide (red.): Sociologik [Sociologic]: tio essäer om socialitet och tänkande [Ten essays on sociality and thinking] [Review]. Sociologisk forskning, 48(4), 75-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Christian Abrahamsson, Fredrik Palm, Sverre Wide (red.): Sociologik [Sociologic]: tio essäer om socialitet och tänkande [Ten essays on sociality and thinking]
2011 (Swedish)In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 75-78Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2011
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Social Psychology History of Ideas Philosophy
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22345 (URN)000209155800013 ()
Available from: 2012-04-03 Created: 2012-04-03 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2011). Ett svar som kräver en fråga: om Johan Asplunds socialpsykologi. In: Jonas Lindblom,Jonas Stier (Ed.), Det socialpsykologiska perspektivet: . Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ett svar som kräver en fråga: om Johan Asplunds socialpsykologi
2011 (Swedish)In: Det socialpsykologiska perspektivet / [ed] Jonas Lindblom,Jonas Stier, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Den sociologiska socialpsykologin har vuxit fram som en reaktion på psykologisk socialpsykologi men också på traditionell, strukturorienterad, sociologi. I denna bok presenteras för första gången på svenska en extensiv och samlad redogörelse för den sociologiska socialpsykologins portalfigurer - deras biografier, idévärldar och begreppsbildningar. Efter att ha positionerat den sociologiska socialpsykologin behandlas i tur och ordning George Herbert Mead, Johan Asplund, Erich Fromm, Erik Homburger Erikson, Erving Goffman, Harold Garfinkel, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jonathan Potter och Judith Butler. Därefter summeras de enskilda bidragen med avsikten att fördjupa förståelsen av ett socialpsykologiskt perspektiv på människan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2011
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33966 (URN)978-91-44-05370-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2011). In-your-face-ethics: phenomenology of the face and social psychological animal studies (1ed.). In: Pär Segerdahl (Ed.), Undisciplined animals: invitations to animal studies (pp. 73-104). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In-your-face-ethics: phenomenology of the face and social psychological animal studies
2011 (English)In: Undisciplined animals: invitations to animal studies / [ed] Pär Segerdahl, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011, 1, p. 73-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this essay, I show how nonhuman animals can challenge anthropocentric theoretical reflection by their mere gaze. According to the central social psychological thought figure, humans become the individual beings they are in the eyes of others. What happens when those others are nonhuman animals? Instead I show that many social philosophers focusing on the encounter face-to-face have a peculiar fascination for nonhuman animals; it is as if nonhuman animals quietly call attention to themselves as soon as philosophers begin their meditations. In the essay, I especially focus on Emmanuel Lévinas phenomenology of the face. For Lévninas, the meeting face to face is prior to all other forms of sociality. When another being respond to your existence, you become someone in the very invitation to speak. The invitation to speak entails a responsibility to respond and confirm the existence of the other, and therefore, ethics is intimately intertwined with the process of perceiving a notion of self and the meeting face-to-face. While Lévinas argues that we never can decide in advance who has a face and who has not, and that human beings may be bereaved of their faces, Lévinas is not ready to grant a face to a nonhuman animal. This has raised a discussion whether Lévinas is indeed consistent with his own thinking. I show that Lévinas position in relation to nonhuman animals does not follow from his discussion of the phenomenology of the face, but from the things he associate with the word ‘animal’, and from how he uses it to define the human subject.  I suggest that studies of social life cannot define in advance what an ‘other’ is, since the moment where we discover a new face and challenge our notion of ourselves is an integral part of social existence. Since an important aspect of Lévinas face is that it is always prior to the I, then we can never dismiss a possible face in advance. This becomes crucial in relation to nonhuman animals, since they regularly are bereaved of their faces with reference to their animality, even though many people interact face-to-face with nonhuman animals. Consequently, in order not to risk neglecting meaningful interaction, social scientists need an open stance toward possible faces, and they should start by letting nonhuman animals into social science studies in general, and social psychological studies in particular.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011 Edition: 1
Keywords
Emmanuel Lévinas, Jacques Derrida, Donna Haraway, postmodern ethics, animal ethics, face, animal studies, human-animal relations, l'animot, Djurens Rätt, Animal Liberation Front
National Category
Social Psychology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27070 (URN)978-1-4438-2951-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-01-28 Created: 2013-01-28 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2010). The construction of a celebrity and her pet: a case study of Paris Hilton and Tinkerbell. In: : . Paper presented at Animal Movements Moving Animals, Uppsala universitet 27-28 maj 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The construction of a celebrity and her pet: a case study of Paris Hilton and Tinkerbell
2010 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Paris Hilton, heiress of the Hilton hotel chain fortune, is well-known from several reality-TV shows, a music career, and frequent appearances in tabloids all over the world. Often by her side, the Chihuahua Tinkerbell has become one of the world’s most famous now living pets, and she is the author of her biography, written in first person singular. The relation between Hilton and Tinkerbell seems almost archetypical – it appears to be the perfect incarnation of the bourgeois pet-owner, moving her dog around in an expensive handbag as an accessory without any regard to the real pet behind the Gucci collar. Nevertheless, there is a peculiar focus on Tinkerbell in different forms of celebrity media; people seem to be especially moved by this dog and her destiny.In a discourse analysis of books, tabloid articles, reality show episodes, interviews and images from celebrity magazines, it is shown that imagery and text cooperate to produce Tinkerbell as a person. This is done through a number of different discursive techniques and among them is the linguistic prosthesis. This concept refers to the way people speak for animals, i.e. ascribe them a voice in first person singular, and it is often done in order to make sense of the animal’s behavior. By giving an animal a voice, the animal is made intoan active, social subject, but in the case of Tinkerbell, the voice of the produced canine subject is often heavily normative. It is used to criticize her mistress’ sometimes unreliable behavior, to question the mistreatment of pets, and to express a general critique against life in the lap of luxury. In the interplay between text and pet a certain form of common sense is produced and disseminated.The discussion is divided in two sections. First, it is argued that popular media’s fixation with Tinkerbell stems from the way the pet as a social phenomenon trifle with common dichotomies such as nature/culture, authenticity/simulation, wilderness/civilization, speech/speechlessness, child/adult and poor/rich. Second, the relation between representations of animals in media, such as wildlife films and TV-shows on dog-training and veterinary clinics, is discussed in relation to the epistemology of the reality show genre.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33970 (URN)
Conference
Animal Movements Moving Animals, Uppsala universitet 27-28 maj 2010
Note

Conference homepage: http://www.genna.gender.uu.se/conferences-events/conferences-workshops/animal-movements-moving-animals/

Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2009). Det binäras magi: om den binära kategoriseringens principer och om husdjuret som det antibinäras tankefigur. In: Andreas Nyblom (Ed.), Det binäras magi: Om den binära kategoriseringens principer och om husdjuret som det antibinäras tankefigur. Paper presented at Kultur~Natur: Konferens för kulturstudier i Sverige, Conference in Sweden 15–17 June 2009 (pp. 33-37). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det binäras magi: om den binära kategoriseringens principer och om husdjuret som det antibinäras tankefigur
2009 (Swedish)In: Det binäras magi: Om den binära kategoriseringens principer och om husdjuret som det antibinäras tankefigur / [ed] Andreas Nyblom, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009, p. 33-37Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Presentationen utforskar binära kategoriseringars logik och möjligheterna till dekonstruktionistiska förhållningssätt till det binära. För att studera detta abstrakta begrepp analyserar jag binariteterna svensk/invandrare, man/kvinna och människa/djur med utgångspunkt i texter av Michael Azar, Judith Butler och Donna Haraway. Genom en jämförelse av dessa tre analyser visar jag att binär kategorisering blir möjlig, trots att de binära begreppen saknar egentligt innehåll, genom ett antal principer – det binäras magi. Utifrån en diskussion om Gadamers syn på satir, baserad på Hegels verkehrt Welt, visar jag avslutningsvis att ett satiriskt soci-alpsykologiskt förhållningssätt genomsyrar Azars, Butlers och Haraways dekonstruktioner av respektive binaritet. Jag framhäver husdjuret som det antibinäras tankefigur och argumenterar för att varje kritik av binära kategoriseringar måste sluta i frågan om vad det mänskliga är.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009
Series
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3740 ; 40
Keywords
Binära kategoriseringar, social kategorisering, relationen mellan män-niskor och djur, naturecultures, companions species, intersektionalitet, satir, queer-teori, performativitet
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27068 (URN)
Conference
Kultur~Natur: Konferens för kulturstudier i Sverige, Conference in Sweden 15–17 June 2009
Available from: 2013-04-02 Created: 2013-01-28 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2009). Husdjurets genealogi. Paper presented at Kultursociologisk konferens, Växjö, 14-15 September 2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Husdjurets genealogi
2009 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Hur kan man undersöka relationen mellan människa och djur? Detta är huvudfrågan för presentationen. I relationen mellan människa och djur utmanas dikotomierna kultur/natur, språklig/stum, och samhälls/naturvetenskap, och författaren vill därför, i enighet med samtida forskningsresultat på animal studies-fältet, plädera för en sociologisk problematisering av icke-mänskliga djur. I centrum för diskussionen står språket som genom historien ofta fungerat som en filosofisk vattendelare mellan människa och djur – människor har språk i en särskild bemärkelse, medan djur är utan. Samtidigt tar icke-mänskliga djur plats i ett språkligt samhälle och formar tillsammans med människor detta samhälle. Därför ställer icke-mänskliga djur både poststrukturalistiska och klassiska sociologiska frågor på sin spets. Författaren argumenterar för en dekonstruktionistisk sociologisk studie av husdjursfenomenet som en utmaning av sociologins antropocentrism och en utveckling av det poststrukturalistsiska språkbegreppet. Denna studie är ett planerat fyraårigt avhandlingsprojekt.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27067 (URN)
Conference
Kultursociologisk konferens, Växjö, 14-15 September 2009
Available from: 2013-01-28 Created: 2013-01-28 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2009). Meet a can of meat: on Lévinasiane ethics and non-human faces. Paper presented at Meet Animal Meat, Uppsala, 21-23 May,2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meet a can of meat: on Lévinasiane ethics and non-human faces
2009 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, I show how nonhuman animals can challenge anthropocentric theoretical reflection only by their gaze. According to the central social psychological thought figure, humans become the individual beings they are in the eyes of others. What happens when those others are nonhuman animals? Instead I show that many social philosophers focusing on the encounter face-to-face have a peculiar fascination for nonhuman animals; it is as if nonhuman animals quietly call attention to themselves as soon as philosophers begin their meditations. In the paper, I especially focus on Emmanuel Lévinas phenomenology of the face. For Lévninas, the meeting face to face is prior to all other forms of sociality. When another being respond to your existence, you become someone in the very invitation to speak. The invitation to speak entails a responsibility to respond and confirm the existence of the other, and therefore, ethics is intimately intertwined with the process of perceiving a notion of self and the meeting face-to-face. While Lévinas argues that we never can decide in advance who has a face and who has not, and that human beings may be bereaved of their faces, Lévinas is not ready to grant a face to a nonhuman animal. This has raised a discussion whether Lévinas is indeed consistent with his own thinking. I show that Lévinas position in relation to nonhuman animals does not follow from his discussion of the phenomenology of the face, but from the things he associate with the word ‘animal’, and from how he uses it to define the human subject.  I suggest that studies of social life cannot define in advance what an ‘other’ is, since the moment where we discover a new face and challenge our notion of ourselves is an integral part of social existence. Since an important aspect of Lévinas face is that it is always prior to the I, then we can never dismiss a possible face in advance. This becomes crucial in relation to nonhuman animals, since they regularly are bereaved of their faces with reference to their animality, even though many people interact face-to-face with nonhuman animals. Consequently, in order not to risk neglecting meaningful interaction, social scientists need an open stance toward possible faces, and they should start by letting nonhuman animals into social science studies in general, and social psychological studies in particular.

National Category
Social Psychology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27066 (URN)
Conference
Meet Animal Meat, Uppsala, 21-23 May,2009
Available from: 2013-01-28 Created: 2013-01-28 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2009). When species meet [Review]. Sociologisk forskning (4), 71-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When species meet
2009 (English)In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, no 4, p. 71-73Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-13042 (URN)000273197200006 ()
Available from: 2011-01-11 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
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