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Avdic, Anders
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Avdic, A., Grönberg, P., Olsson, J. & Guerra Riveros, F. (2013). Student and teacher response system: development of an interactive anonymous real-timeformative feedback system. In: Ngo, L. .T., Abraham, A., Bui, L. T. Corchado, E., Yun-Hoi, C. & Ma, K. (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2013 Third World Congress on Information and Communication Technologies (WICT 2013): . Paper presented at 2013 Third World Congress on Information and Communication Technologies (WICT 2013), Hanoi, Dec 15-18, 2013 (pp. 25-30). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student and teacher response system: development of an interactive anonymous real-timeformative feedback system
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2013 Third World Congress on Information and Communication Technologies (WICT 2013) / [ed] Ngo, L. .T., Abraham, A., Bui, L. T. Corchado, E., Yun-Hoi, C. & Ma, K., IEEE, 2013, p. 25-30Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper is focusing IT-supported real-time formative feedback in a classroom context. The development of a Student and Teacher Response System (STRS) is described. Since there are a number of obstacles for effective interaction in large classes IT can be used to support the teachers aim to find out if students understand the lecture and accordingly adjust the content and design of the lecture. The system can be used for formative assessment before, during, and after a lecture. It is also possible for students to initiate interaction during lectures by posing questions anonymously. The main contributions of the paper are a) the description of the interactive real-time system and b) the development process behind it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2013
Keywords
Student Response System; SRS; STRS; interaction; formative feedback; agile development
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33453 (URN)10.1109/WICT.2013.7113103 (DOI)000380541300005 ()978-1-4799-3230-6 (ISBN)
Conference
2013 Third World Congress on Information and Communication Technologies (WICT 2013), Hanoi, Dec 15-18, 2013
Available from: 2014-01-30 Created: 2014-01-30 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved
Islam, M. S. & Avdic, A. (2010). Knowledge management practices in e-government: a developing country perspective. In: Tomasz Janowski, Jim Davies (Ed.), ICEGOV '10: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance. Paper presented at 4th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance, Beijing, China (pp. 73-78). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge management practices in e-government: a developing country perspective
2010 (English)In: ICEGOV '10: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance / [ed] Tomasz Janowski, Jim Davies, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2010, p. 73-78Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Why did Bangladesh number one in the current e-government ranking among the least developed countries (LDCs), while stood 23rd in knowledge management ranking? Efficient ways of sharing and managing knowledge is imperative for the effectiveness of e-government initiatives in any country. E-government and knowledge management should not appear individually. This paper is based on an interpretative research approach that discusses the theoretical and practical aspects of knowledge management and e-government initiatives in the context of developing countries. For the purpose of analysis, online research papers and reports were investigated and Bangladesh was considered as a country for explaining the context of developing countries. The case for Bangladesh shows that while the government can easily present online a number of its services, these may not be effective for the targeted users as those services are failed to address some critical implementation factors. Furthermore, the critical factors for e-government imitative that can be known by the policy makers adequately if they are participated in the knowledge sharing process efficiently with appropriate approaches and technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2010
Keywords
Knowledge Management, E-government, Public Sector Management, Developing countries, Bangladesh
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12784 (URN)10.1145/1930321.1930338 (DOI)978-1-4503-0058-2 (ISBN)
Conference
4th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance, Beijing, China
Available from: 2010-12-27 Created: 2010-12-27 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
Avdic, A. & Eklund, A. (2010). Searching reference databases: what students experience and what teachers believe that students experience. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 42(4), 224-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Searching reference databases: what students experience and what teachers believe that students experience
2010 (English)In: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, ISSN 0961-0006, E-ISSN 1741-6477, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 224-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Internet has made it possible for students to access a vast amount of high quality references when writing papers. Yet research has shown that the use of reference databases is poor and the quality of student papers is consequently often below expectation. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, it aims to describe the problems students experience when they search information using a university reference database. Second it aims to compare the perspective of students on the problems with that of their teachers. As basis for the study we have used the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model. A web-based survey was carried out. A total of 150 students at Örebro University in Sweden participated in the survey. The results have been analysed by comparison of median values. Results show that students experience problems mostly in the category of efforts expectancy. Differences between the two groups are most significant in the category of effort expectancy and students’ patience in searching. Teachers are more pessimistic about students’ capacity in information searching than the students themselves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage, 2010
Keywords
Information literacy, reference databases, students’ experience, technology acceptance, UTAUT-model, Library and information science
National Category
Information Systems Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8913 (URN)10.1177/0961000610380119 (DOI)000284685700002 ()2-s2.0-78649779212 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Ericsson, F. & Avdic, A. (2009). Knowledge management systems acceptance (2ed.). In: Mehdi Khosrow-Pour (Ed.), Encyclopedia of information science and technology: (pp. 2368-2372). Hershey, PA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge management systems acceptance
2009 (English)In: Encyclopedia of information science and technology / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2009, 2, p. 2368-2372Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Knowledge management is a set of systematic actions that organizations can take to obtain the greatest value from the knowledge available to it (Davenport & Prusak, 1998). Systematic means that knowledge management is made up of intentional actions in an organizational context. Value means that knowledge management is measured according to how knowledge management projects contribute to increased organizational ability (see for example Prieto & Gutiérrez, 2001; see Goldkuhl & Braf, 2002, on the subject of organizational ability). The motivation for knowledge management is that the key to competitive advantage for organizations in today’s business world is organizations’ ability to manage knowledge (Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995; Davenport & Prusak, 1998). Knowledge management as an intentional and value-adding action is not easy to accomplish in practice (Scarbrough & Swan, 1999). Scarbrough and Swan (1999) present several case studies in knowledge management, successful and unsuccessful in their respective knowledge management projects. A major point and lessons learned from the case studies is that prevalent approaches in knowledge management overstate technology and understate how technology is implemented and applied. To succeed with knowledge management, encompassing development of information technology-based information system, some requirements have to be fulfilled. An important aspect in the development process is system acceptance. Implementation is at large a process of acceptance. Implementation is the process where the system becomes an integrated part of the users’ or workers’ work practice. Therefore implementation is essential to make a knowledge management project successful in order attain an increased organizational ability and to succeed with knowledge management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2009 Edition: 2
Keywords
Knowledge Management, Acceptance, Operational disturbances
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8927 (URN)10.4018/978-1-60566-026-4.ch375 (DOI)9781605660264 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-12-23 Created: 2009-12-23 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Hatakka, M., Avdic, A. & Grönlund, Å. (2009). Open content use in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka: context flexibility as an enabler for reuse. In: Workshop proceedings: 2nd Annual SIG GlobDev Workshop. Paper presented at 2nd Annual SIG GlobDev Workshop 2009, Phoenix AZ (pp. Paper 11).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open content use in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka: context flexibility as an enabler for reuse
2009 (English)In: Workshop proceedings: 2nd Annual SIG GlobDev Workshop, 2009, p. Paper 11-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Free-to-use learning material, open content (OC), is ascribed the potential to change the playingfield in regards to every individual’s right to education. OC is, however, not much used indeveloping countries. The aim of this paper is to study how actors involved in contentdevelopment affect reuse of OC. Actor-Network Theory (ANT) concepts are used to describecontent development processes in two cases (in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka). Findings show thatthere are content properties that need to be flexible and adaptable for it to be used. The propertiesmust not only fit with students and content developers, it must also be adaptable to fit with theeducational organization and the technologies used for dissemination. Since there are manyactors and properties that must be aligned it is unlikely that fully context independent OC can bedeveloped. For OC to play a role for development the focus has to be on developing flexiblecontent that easily can be adapted to different contexts.

Keywords
open content, content development, flexibility, ICT4D, actor-network theory, reuse
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8941 (URN)978-0-9826068-1-0 (ISBN)
Conference
2nd Annual SIG GlobDev Workshop 2009, Phoenix AZ
Available from: 2009-12-25 Created: 2009-12-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Avdic, A. (2009). Spreadsheet End User Development and Knowledge Management (2ed.). In: Mehdi Khosrow-Pour (Ed.), Encyclopedia of information science and technology: (pp. 3564-3569). Hershey, PA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spreadsheet End User Development and Knowledge Management
2009 (English)In: Encyclopedia of information science and technology / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2009, 2, p. 3564-3569Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the early days of computers, expertise was needed in order to use computers. As IT tools have become more powerful and user friendly, more and more people have been able to use computers and programs as tools when carrying out working tasks. Nowadays, it is possible for people without special IT training to develop Information Systems (IS) that only IT specialists could have done some years ago. In this paper End User Development (EUD) using a Spreadsheet Program (SP) is discussed from a knowledge management perspective. EUD can be a part of an organization’s effort to take advantage of existing, often tacit, knowledge or creating new knowledge. An end user is a person who acts both as a user and a systems developer. A typical feature of an end user is that he has a good (often unique) knowledge of the business and the work related to the IS in question, which is called the User Developed Application. It is the combination of these two sorts of knowledge which is the key to EUD as knowledge management. The aim of this of this chapter is to relate EUD to knowledge management and, specifically, to describe how tacit knowledge can be audited when end users develop spreadsheet systems for their own domain of expertise. The main source is a set of qualitative case studies carried out between 1995 and 2005. (Avdic, 1999; Westin, Avdic & Roberts, 2005)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2009 Edition: 2
Keywords
End user developer, End user development, End User Application, Knowledge Management, Tacit knowledge, Explicit knowledge, Communities of Practice
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8914 (URN)10.4018/978-1-60566-026-4.ch568 (DOI)9781605660264 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Grönlund, Å. & Avdic, A. (2009). Ten years of eGovernment: the end of history and a new beginning. Paper presented at International conference of Information Systems.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ten years of eGovernment: the end of history and a new beginning
2009 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

eGovernment practice has over the past decade developed considerably in a technical perspective moving from information provision to complete transactional services. In terms of organizational adoption the change is less impressive overall and there are structural obstacles. While new business models have indeed evolved in large government organizations where scale advantages are easily found and transactions are easily automated, these models have not been fully disseminated across the range of government organizations where services are more complex and operations small-scale. Also, whole-system synergies have not happened as expected because stovepipes tend to pertain in the e-service government. This paper argues that although there is no lack of eGovernment “frameworks”, both governments and research are both in need of better guiding models in order to address contemporary and future challenges. This argument is pursued by reviewing a decade of eGovernment development and research in terms of the guiding values as expressed by influential maturity models and relating them to the eGovernment domain, as defined by formal definitions and practice in combination. We find that development so far has overall been too narrowly guided by a technical focus and economic and administrative values and too little informed by public sector values. While there is no lack of broad frameworks there is scarcity as concerns structured research and evaluation models that encompass such values. The paper examines some models dealing with such values and concludes by proposing criteria by which maturity models should be designed so as to serve as good guides for the next decade of eGovernment development.

Keywords
Maturity model, eGovernment, electronic services, organization, values, public values
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8918 (URN)
Conference
International conference of Information Systems
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Hatakka, M., Avdic, A. & Andersson, A. (2007). SCORM: from the perspective of the course designer : a critical review. Paper presented at 6th European Conference on eLearning.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SCORM: from the perspective of the course designer : a critical review
2007 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The introduction of e-Learning opens new possibilities and new ways of delivering courses. Learning objects can be used and reused in educational contexts to educate students, employees, administrative officers and citizens. In later years Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM) developed by Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) has more or less become a de-facto standard for creating learning materials that can be used in different learning management systems (LMS).There are many scientific papers that deal with the benefits of e-Learning from a learner’s perspective, or from a strictly economical point of view. In this paper we critically evaluate which benefits and drawbacks a course designer in a university setting can have from using the SCORM standard to deliver a course to the students. We use scenarios to test what benefits and drawbacks can be observed by setting up a course on an LMS with and without the use of the SCORM specification.Our findings show that for a course designer, advantages with SCORM are possibility of reuse, use of metadata and possibility to sequence the learning path of the learner. The most important drawback for a course designer is the lack of flexibility when using SCORM. Another major drawback is structure rigidity. In order to fully be able to use the potential of SCORM the course design and content should not be changed after the course is started. This might have negative impact on the possibilities to design a university course if the field of study is volatile, like many ICT-related topics are.

National Category
Information Systems Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8919 (URN)
Conference
6th European Conference on eLearning
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Avdic, A., Hedström, K., Rose, J. & Grönlund, Å. (Eds.). (2007). Understanding eParticipation: Contemporary PhD eParticipation Research in Europe. Örebro: Örebro universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding eParticipation: Contemporary PhD eParticipation Research in Europe
2007 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This book presents contemporary European research on eParticipation by means of a 13 chapters each describing a PhD research project as well as analyses of this research. The book both reflects the field and contributes to shaping it by discussing both long-standing and emerging issues. Contributions include three chapters on issues of DEVELOPMENT, including communities of practice, user-centred development, and safety & privacy issues, four chapters on IMPLEMENTATION, including spatial planning, participatory budgeting, and transformation processes, and five chapters on issues of USE, focusing on local government, developing countries, EU, civil society and NGO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2007. p. 241
Keywords
e-participation, e-democracy, e-government
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-1475 (URN)978-91-7668-530-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2007-09-11 Created: 2007-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Avdic, A. (2006). Knowledge sharing and deliberation using a spreadsheet program: two examples from a city planning department. Paper presented at Research seminar in Informatics Örebro, Nov 2006.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge sharing and deliberation using a spreadsheet program: two examples from a city planning department
2006 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8937 (URN)
Conference
Research seminar in Informatics Örebro, Nov 2006
Available from: 2009-12-23 Created: 2009-12-23 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
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