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Almon, Ricardo
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Almon, R., Alvarez-Leon, E. E. & Serra-Majem, L. (2012). Association of the European lactase persistence variant (LCT-13910 C > T Polymorphism) with obesity in the Canary Islands. PLoS ONE, 7(8), Article ID e43978.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of the European lactase persistence variant (LCT-13910 C > T Polymorphism) with obesity in the Canary Islands
2012 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e43978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: European lactose tolerance genotype (LCT -13910 C>T, rs4988234) has been positively associated to body mass indexes (BMI) in a meta-analysis of 31,720 individuals of northern and central European descent. A strong association of lactase persistence (LP) with BMI and obesity has also been traced in a Spanish Mediterranean population. The aim of this study was to analyze a potential association of LP compared to lactase non-persistence (LNP) with BMI in inhabitants of the Canary Islands of Spain using Mendelian randomization.

Methods: A representative, randomly sampled population of adults belonging to the Canary Islands Nutrition Survey (ENCA) in Spain, aged 18-75 years (n = 551), was genotyped for the LCT - 13910 C>T polymorphism. Milk consumption was assessed by a validated questionnaire. Anthropometric variables were directly measured. WHO classification of BMI was used.

Results: LP individuals were significantly more obese than LNP subjects (chi(2) = 10.59; p < 0.005). LP showed in a multivariate linear regression analysis showed a positive association of LP with BMI compared to LNP, (beta = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.08-1.85, p = 0.033). In a multinomial logistic regression analysis normal range weight LP subjects showed an odds ratio for obesity of 2.41; 95% CI 1.39-418, (p = 0.002) compared to LNP.

Conclusions: The T-13910 of the allele LCT-13910 C>T polymorphism is positively associated with BMI. LP increases significantly the risk to develop obesity in the studied population. The LCT-13910 C>T polymorphism stands proxy for the lifetime exposure pattern, milk intake, that may increase susceptibility to obesity and to obesity related pathologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: Public Library Science, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29769 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0043978 (DOI)000308225500131 ()22937140 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84866601832 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-06-27 Created: 2013-06-25 Last updated: 2018-05-12Bibliographically approved
Almon, R., Patterson, E., Nilsson, T. K., Engfeldt, P. & Sjöström, M. (2010). Body fat and dairy product intake in lactase persistent and non-persistent children and adolescents. Food & Nutrition Research, 54, Article ID 5141.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body fat and dairy product intake in lactase persistent and non-persistent children and adolescents
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2010 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 54, article id 5141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lactase non-persistent (LNP) individuals may be lactose intolerant and therefore on a more restricted diet concerning milk and milk products compared to lactase persistent (LP) individuals. This may have an impact on body fat mass.

Objective This study examines if LP and LNP children and adolescents, defined by genotyping for the LCT-13910 C > T polymorphism, differ from each other with regard to milk and milk product intake, and measures of body fat mass.

Design: Children (n=298, mean age 9.6 years) and adolescents (n=386, mean age 15.6 years), belonging to the Swedish part of the European Youth Heart Study, were genotyped for the LCT-13910 C > T polymorphism. Dietary intakes of reduced and full-fat dairy varieties were determined.

Results: LNP (CC genotype) subjects consumed less milk, soured milk and yoghurt compared to LP (CT/TT genotype) subjects (p<0.001). Subsequent partitioning for age group attenuated this observation (p=0.002 for children and p=0.023 in adolescents). Six subjects were reported by parents to be 'lactose intolerant', none of whom were LNP. LNP children and adolescents consumed significantly less reduced fat milk and milk products than LP children and adolescents (p=0.009 for children and p=0.001 for adolescents).

Conclusions: We conclude that LP is linked to an overall higher milk and dairy intake, but is not linked to higher body fat mass in children and adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Järfälla, Sweden: Co-action Publishing, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15350 (URN)10.3402/fnr.v54i0.5141 (DOI)000208683500006 ()20585563 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77955476574 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-04-21 Created: 2011-04-21 Last updated: 2018-04-23Bibliographically approved
Almon, R. (2010). Lactase Persistence and Lactase Non-Persistence: Prevalence, influence on body fat, body height, and relation to the metabolic syndrome. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lactase Persistence and Lactase Non-Persistence: Prevalence, influence on body fat, body height, and relation to the metabolic syndrome
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2010. p. 45
Series
Örebro Studies in Medicine, ISSN 1652-4063 ; 48
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11854 (URN)978-91-7668-767-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-12-15, Wilandersalen, Universitetssjukhuset Örebro, Fakultetsgatan 1, 701 82 Örebro, 09:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Almon, R., Alvarez-Leon, E. E., Engfeldt, P., Serra-Majem, L. & Nilsson, T. K. (2009). Associations between lactase persistence and the metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study in the Canary Islands. Paper presented at Metabolic syndrome typ II diabetes and arteriosclerosis congress.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between lactase persistence and the metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study in the Canary Islands
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2009 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-9718 (URN)
Conference
Metabolic syndrome typ II diabetes and arteriosclerosis congress
Available from: 2010-02-12 Created: 2010-02-12 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Almon, R., Alvarez-Leon, E. E., Engfeldt, P., Serra-Majem, L., Magnuson, A. & Nilsson, T. . (2009). Associations between lactase persistence and the metabolic syndrome: a Mendelian randomization study in the Canary Islands. Paper presented at Santiago, Chile.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between lactase persistence and the metabolic syndrome: a Mendelian randomization study in the Canary Islands
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2009 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Physiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition; Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-9719 (URN)
Conference
Santiago, Chile
Available from: 2010-02-12 Created: 2010-02-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Almon, R., Alvarez-Leon, E. E., Engfeldt, P., Serra-Majem, L., Magnuson, A. & Nilsson, T. K. (2009). Associations between lactase persistence and the metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study in the Canary Islands. European Journal of Nutrition, 49(3), 141-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between lactase persistence and the metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study in the Canary Islands
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2009 (English)In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 141-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) LCT -13910 C>T, associated with genetically determined phenotypes of lactase persistence (LP) or non-persistence (LNP), was studied in relation to the metabolic syndrome (MS).

AIim of the study: The aim was to determine if milk intake and MS are associated. We applied Mendelian randomization (MR). The SNP, LCT -13910 C>T, with the genotypes LP (TT/CT) and LNP (CC), was taken as a proxy for milk consumption.

Methods: A representative sample of adults belonging to the Canary Islands Nutrition Survey (ENCA) in Spain aged 18-75 years (n = 551) was genotyped for the LCT -13910 C>T polymorphism. We used the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria to define MS. RESULTS: 60% of the population was LP and 40% LNP. One hundred seven LP subjects (35.0%) and 53 LNP subjects (25.6%) showed MS (chi (2) = 5.04, p = 0.025). LP subjects showed a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) for MS than LNP subjects computed for the whole population: both the crude OR (1.56; 95% CI 1.06-2.31) and adjusted OR for sex, age, daily energy intake, physical activity and educational level (1.57; 95% CI 1.02-2.43). Adjusted OR for women with LP was 1.93; 95% CI 1.06-3.52.

Conclusions: The T allele of the SNP might constitute a nutrigenetic factor increasing the susceptibility of LP subjects, especially women, to develop MS in the Canary Islands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg, Germany: Springer, 2009
Keyword
LCT-13910 C > T polymorphism, Metabolic syndrome, Metabolic syndrome, Milk, Mendelian randomization
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Physiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-9716 (URN)10.1007/s00394-009-0058-2 (DOI)000275631500002 ()19844753 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77950864600 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-02-12 Created: 2010-02-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Almon, R., Engfeldt, P., Tysk, C., Sjöström, M. & Nilsson, T. K. (2007). Prevalence and trends in adult-type hypolactasia in different age cohorts in Central Sweden diagnosed by genotyping for the adult-type hypolactasia-linked LCT -13910C > T mutation. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 42(2), 165-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and trends in adult-type hypolactasia in different age cohorts in Central Sweden diagnosed by genotyping for the adult-type hypolactasia-linked LCT -13910C > T mutation
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2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Adult-type hypolactasia (AtH) can be diagnosed by genotyping in addition to functional tests or intestinal biopsy. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of AtH by genotyping and to investigate whether AtH prevalence has changed in Sweden during the 20th century. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Schoolchildren (n=690) born in 1983 and 1989, and elderly individuals (n=392) born between 1920 and 1932 were genotyped for AtH using Pyrosequencing technology. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of AtH among children was 14.1%. The majority of children (92%, n=635) were Caucasians with genotype prevalences: CC, 61 (10%); CT, 259 (41%); TT, 307 (49%). The frequency of the mutated allele q was 0.300 in this cohort. The prevalence of AtH estimated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) (q 2), was 9.0% (95% CI: 6.7-11.2%). Eight percent (n=55) of the children were non-Caucasian; genotype prevalences were CC, 36 (66%); CT, 15 (27%); TT, 4 (7%). The prevalence of AtH in these children estimated from HWE was 62.5% (95% CI: 49.7-75.3%). The elderly subjects were all Caucasians. Their genotype prevalences were: CC, 20 (5%); CT, 166 (42%); TT, 206 (53%); the frequency of the mutated allele q was 0.262 and their AtH prevalence estimated from HWE was 6.8% (95% CI: 4.3-9.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The overall prevalence of AtH in children (14%) was higher than previously thought. Among Caucasians, higher figures were seen in children than in the elderly (9% versus 6.8%). The prevalence thus seems to be increasing and this may be due to the immigration of both non-Caucasian and Caucasian groups with a higher prevalence of AtH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Taylor & Francis, 2007
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11542 (URN)10.1080/00365520600825257 (DOI)17327935 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-08-11 Created: 2010-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Almon, R., Nilsson, T. K., Sjöström, M. & Engfeldt, P.Milk consumption and body height in preadolescent and adolescent children.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Milk consumption and body height in preadolescent and adolescent children
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15352 (URN)
Available from: 2011-04-21 Created: 2011-04-21 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
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