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Johansson, Mattias
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Ericson, H., Quennerstedt, M., Skoog, T. & Johansson, M. (2018). Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, 10(2), 206-222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years
2018 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most studies on issues relating to ageing, physical activity and health are based on an understanding of what causes illness, rather than what promotes health. The health benefits of physical activity relate to questions about how to avoid physical inactivity and overcoming barriers to participating in physical activity, rather than why older people continue to be physically active. The aim of this study was to explore health resources in relation to physical activity, especially resistance training, that physically active women between the ages of 69–75 years characterise as important for the maintenance of health. In order to investigate these health resources, the study drew on salutogenic theory and the concept of sense of coherence. The analysed data came from interviews with 14 physically active Swedish women aged 69–75 years who had previously taken part in a resistance training intervention, but who also had continued to engage in physical activity and resistance training when the intervention ended. We identified seven health resources, social relations and care, positive energy, self-worth, capability in and about physical activity, the habit of exercising, identity as an exercising person and womanhood related to physical activity, in this case resistance training, that physically active women aged between 69 and 75 years characterised as important for maintaining their health. In conclusion, physical activity carried out in a stable group of peers provided a meaningful, comprehensible and manageable way for these older women to engage in the on-going process of maintaining health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Health resources, exercise, resistance training, salutogenesis, older adults
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61946 (URN)10.1080/2159676X.2017.1393453 (DOI)000431127700005 ()2-s2.0-85031919728 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Ericson, H., Skoog, T., Johansson, M. & Wåhlin-Larsson, B. (2018). Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–70. Journal of Women & Aging, 30(5), 366-381
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–70
2018 (English)In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 366-381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resistance training (RT) improves overall health, but the psychological effects of RT in healthy old adults have not been tested. The aim of this study was to investigate a sample of 65–70-year-old healthy and physically active women to assess their sense of coherence, health-related quality of life, hope, and affect, before and after taking part in a 24-week RT intervention (N = 14), compared to controls (N = 18). Findings showed a significant increase in hope (p = 0.013) and a significant decrease in negative affect (p = 0.002). Starting RT after age 65 does not appear to negatively impact on women’s psychological health but seems to be associated with important psychological health benefits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Healthy aging, hope, negative affect, psychological outcomes, resistance training
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57052 (URN)10.1080/08952841.2017.1301720 (DOI)000443902100002 ()28375777 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85017094736 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Jouper, J. & Johansson, M. (2013). Qigong and mindfulness-based mood recovery: exercise experiences from a single case. Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, 17, 69-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qigong and mindfulness-based mood recovery: exercise experiences from a single case
2013 (English)In: Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, ISSN 1360-8592, E-ISSN 1532-9283, Vol. 17, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sara, the participant in this single case study, had to leave work due to burnout. She is now recovered and working, but still complains ofdisturbed moods and worries about getting burned out again. The aim of this study was to, by way of Qigong and mindfulness exercise, increase the participant’s positive mood to a functional level and to increase exercise experiences by combining mindfulness and Qigong practice. The professional practice intervention was planned to last twelve weeks, combining mindfulness practice and three different Qigong exercise techniques. Exercise behavior was noted daily, stress-energy and wellness were followed up weekly, and mindfulness was followed up after four, nine and 12 weeks. Sara feels that her moods (more energy, wellness and joy, as well as less stress and worry) have stabilized at a high level (good to very good), and her mindfulness score also improved to a high level (4.2 on a six-point scale). Sara also states that she enjoys life more: accepts stressful situations as they are, is less worried about becoming burned out again, and is more open to life. Exercise professionals may use mindfulness practice and Qigong exercise when recovering moods, probably even better in preventing burnout syndromes.

Keywords
Exercise experiences, mindfulness, mood, qigong, recovery
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27187 (URN)10.1016/j.jbmt.2012.06.004 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-02-01 Created: 2013-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M. (2009). Qigong: acute affective responses in a group of regular exercisers. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qigong: acute affective responses in a group of regular exercisers
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Qigong is a Chinese mind-body therapy that aims to, through the use of movements, relaxed breathing and relaxation/meditation, create a healthy flow of life force, qi, in the body, and consequently improve health. A growing number of Qigong studies report beneficial effects on health and well-being. However, little attention has fo-cused on the acute affective responses that accompany single sessions of Qigong ex-ercise. The aim of the present thesis was therefore to study affective reactions to Qigong exercise. In Study I, the effects of Qigong exercise on mood and anxiety were compared to a control group. Results showed partial support for the superiority of Qigong exercise compared to controls. In Study II, different lengths of session time were compared, resulting in similar affective benefits for the 30 and 60-minute ses-sions. In Study III, affective responses were also assessed during the session, using mean scores and individual responses. Results showed an increase toward greater Activated and Deactivated Pleasantness during the session, with the greatest changes at the end of the bout. The majority of individuals reported increased Pleasantness during the Qigong session. Expectations of positive outcomes were significantly as-sociated with only few affective responses. Responses to open-ended questions of af-fective experiences displayed affective reactions mostly toward greater Deactivated Pleasantness. This thesis contributes to a greater understanding of the limited area of Qigong-related affective responses. For the exercisers, Qigong is associated with a greater momentary emotional state. However, due to the highly select group of regu-lar Qigong exercisers, generalizing the results outside the sample population is lim-ited. Theories on active mechanisms in the Qigong-affect relationship, and results from studies of affective responses to similar activities, suggest that other groups of people would also benefit affectively from Qigong exercise. Given the many benefits of positive affect, Qigong exercise may also pose great promises for the enhancement of other areas related to health and well-being. This calls for additional studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2009. p. 129
Series
Örebro Studies in Sport Sciences, ISSN 1654-7535 ; 4
Keywords
qigong, affective responses, mind-body therapy, low-intensive physical activity, affect regulation
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6664 (URN)978-91-7668-665-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-05-29, HSG, Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin, 701 82 Örebro, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-06-17 Created: 2009-05-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Hassmén, P. & Jouper, J. (2008). Acute effects of qigong exercise on mood and anxiety. International Journal of Stress Management, 15(2), 199-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute effects of qigong exercise on mood and anxiety
2008 (English)In: International Journal of Stress Management, ISSN 1072-5245, E-ISSN 1573-3424, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 199-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychosocial stress may lead to increased rates of anxiety and depression. Aerobic exercise and mind-body therapies are frequently described as having positive effects on psychological well-being by enhancing mood and reducing anxiety. Few studies, however, have investigated the acute psychological effects of qigong exercise. Fifty-nine regular qigong exercisers (mean age 50.8 years) were randomized to a Qigong or Control group. Pre- and postmeasurements were then compared. POMS-Depression, Anger, and Fatigue, and STAI-State Anxiety scores decreased significantly in the Qigong group but not in the Control group. Results thereby suggest that qigong exercise can produce desirable psychological effects, and Qigong exercise may therefore be included among other activities performed to boost resistance to daily stressors.

Keywords
qigong, qi-training, anxiety, mood, emotion
National Category
Social Work Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6660 (URN)10.1037/1072-5245.15.2.199 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-05-07 Created: 2009-05-07 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M. & Hassmén, P. (2008). Acute psychological responses to qigong exercise of varying durations. THE American journal of Chinese medicine, 36(3), 449-458
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute psychological responses to qigong exercise of varying durations
2008 (English)In: THE American journal of Chinese medicine, ISSN 0192-415X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 449-458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Qigong exercise has been shown to induce acute psychological changes of a positive nature; but whether longer durations have greater effects than shorter ones is not known. Forty-one regular qigong practitioners therefore engaged in either 30 or 60 min of qigong exercise within a randomized cross-over design. Measures of mood, anxiety, activation, and hedonic tone were obtained pre- and post-exercise. Results showed benefits of the same magnitude in the two conditions: more positive mood states, reduced state anxiety, and enhanced perceived pleasure. Thirty minutes of qigong exercise thereby seems to be sufficient to provide psychological benefits, and with no additional benefits detected after 60 min. This finding is important for those having little time or motivation to engage in activities of longer durations. In addition, health professionals prescribing exercise for health benefits can prescribe shorter exercise sessions with confidence knowing that positive psychological effects can also occur after a shorter exercise bout.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Company, 2008
Keywords
Exercise; Mood; Anxiolytic; Qigong; Qi-Training; Mind–Body Therapy
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6662 (URN)10.1142/S0192415X08005898 (DOI)18543380 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-05-07 Created: 2009-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Jouper, J., Hassmén, P. & Johansson, M. (2006). Qigong exercise with concentration predicts increased health. THE American journal of Chinese medicine, 34(6), 949-957
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qigong exercise with concentration predicts increased health
2006 (English)In: THE American journal of Chinese medicine, ISSN 0192-415X, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 949-957Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Regular physical activity has many positive health effects. Despite this, approximately 50% of all adults are not exercising enough to enjoy better health and may therefore need an alternative to vigorous physical exercise. Qigong offers a gentle way to exercise the body. A questionnaire sample of 253 participants was collected and correlations with the variable Health-now were analyzed. Results showed that Health-now was positively correlated with Number of completed qigong courses (p<.05), with Level of concentration (p<.01), Session-time (p<.01), and Years of practice (p<.05). Among these variables, Concentration predicts an increased feeling of Health (R2 = 0.092). Qigong exercise thereby seems to offer a viable alternative to other more vigorous physical activities when wellness is the primary goal. When interpreted using self-determination theory, qigong seems to satisfy needs related to autonomy, competence and relatedness, thereby primarily attracting individuals who are intrinsically motivated.

Keywords
Biyun, qigong, exercise, intrinsic motivation
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5791 (URN)
Available from: 2009-02-23 Created: 2009-02-23 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Hassmén, P. & Hertting, A. Affective responses to qigong exercise: a pilot study.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affective responses to qigong exercise: a pilot study
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Physical exercise is frequently associated with positive affective responses – at least more intense exercise; the impact of low-intensity exercise is less researched. The exercise-affect relationship was therefore studied in a group performing low-intensity Qigong exercise through pre-, during, and post-assessments using a modified version of the short Swedish Core Affect Scale complemented with open-ended questions. The results show a shift during exercise toward increased pleasant activated and deactivated affect in the group of 46 women who regularly practice Qigong. Inter-individual responses display positive affective responses, which also increase as the bout proceeds for the majority of exercisers. The results suggest that low-intensity Qigong exercise also produces positive psychological effects of a magnitude similar to what is commonly associated with more intense forms of exercise. These findings have practical implications for the enhancement of positive affect and subjective well-being, not least in groups unable to perform more intense forms of exercise. 2

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6663 (URN)
Available from: 2009-05-07 Created: 2009-05-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
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