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Lidskog, Marie
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Bergh, A., Ewins, K. & Lidskog, M. (2018). What is the Difference Between Knowing a Subject and Teaching it?: Interpreation and Guidance of Teaching in Higher Education. In: : . Paper presented at The European Conference on Educational Research (ECER 2018), Bolzano, Italy, September 3-7, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the Difference Between Knowing a Subject and Teaching it?: Interpreation and Guidance of Teaching in Higher Education
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Teaching, higher education, interpretation, guidance
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68933 (URN)
Conference
The European Conference on Educational Research (ECER 2018), Bolzano, Italy, September 3-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Särnblad, S., Lidskog, M., Walfridsson, H., Hjelmqvist, H. & Duberg, A.-S. (2018). Will Early Clinical Training improve the professional skills?: Experience from a New Medical Education in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at AMEE (An International Association for Medical Education), Basel, Switzerland, 25-29 August, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Will Early Clinical Training improve the professional skills?: Experience from a New Medical Education in Sweden
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: The undergraduate medical education in Sweden is 5½ years long (11 semesters), followed by an 18 months internship before license. The university curriculum used to be 6 theoretical semesters followed by 5 “clinical” semesters. Today it is common with integrated curricula with an early introduction of clinical training.

Method: School of Medicine at Örebro University started in January 2011 and now admits 70 students every semester. The first students graduated in June 2016. The educational approach is problem-based learning and the curriculum is integrated with six themes based on physiological processes. Biomedicine, clinical medicine and professional development are integrated throughout the entire programme.

Results: In total, clinical placement constitutes 74 weeks of which 16 weeks are spread through the first six semesters. The remaining 58 weeks (semester 7-11) are divided into six longer periods related to the themes. The objective of clinical placement during the first 6 semesters is to practice general clinical skills like communication, history-taking and clinical examination, but also to understand the health care system and the tasks of other health care personnel. The clinical placement in semester 6 ends with a seminar for reflection around the professional development and the value of early clinical placement. The students appreciate the early clinical placements. They manage to acquire general professional skills at this early stage and have the possibility to reflect upon their choice of profession. This stimulates theoretical studies and makes them more comfortable when entering the long clinical placements related to the themes. This is beneficial also for the clinical tutors. The first Örebro students that graduated were satisfied with the preparation given “to work as doctors” and gave the University the highest rank in a national survey.

Conclusion: Early clinical training is beneficial for the development of professional skills; it motivates and gives the student an early understanding of their future professional role. A challenge may be to find enough placements and the need for coaching adjusted for different stages of professional development.

Take-home message: Early clinical training is beneficial for the development of professional skills.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67486 (URN)
Conference
AMEE (An International Association for Medical Education), Basel, Switzerland, 25-29 August, 2018
Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Ewins, K., Bergh, A. & Lidskog, M. (2017). What is the difference between knowing a subject and teaching it?: Enactments of teaching in higher education. In: : . Paper presented at 45th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), Copenhagen, Denmark, March 23-25, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the difference between knowing a subject and teaching it?: Enactments of teaching in higher education
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64995 (URN)
Conference
45th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), Copenhagen, Denmark, March 23-25, 2017
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved
Cesta, A., Cortellessa, G., Fracasso, F., Orlandini, A., Fredriksson, C., Lidskog, M., . . . Gutierrez, C. (2012). GiraffPlus: D1.1 User Requirements and Design Principles Report.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GiraffPlus: D1.1 User Requirements and Design Principles Report
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2012 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This document reports on the work performed in Task 1.1 User requirements analysis and Task 1.2 GiraffPlus Environment Design Principles. Specifically, it describes the results of a deep involvement of users, both primary (elderly living in their apartment), and secondary (health care professional or family members and friends) recruited in our studies. The report details the qualitative and quantitative research carried out in the three countries of Sweden, Spain and Italy, to elicit user requirements and expectations in terms of type of services as well as system design and appearance. Some qualitative cross-cultural analysis has also been performed in order to highlight differences emerged during the studies in the three countries. Result of this effort is list of user requirements and a set of preferences on different mockups of a component of the system that can be both used to influence the future architecture definition and functional specification of the GiraffPlus system. The work described in this deliverable constitutes the starting point of T1.3 Technological Component Assessment and Selection and overall provides useful hints to the whole system development.

Publisher
p. 160
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42544 (URN)
Projects
Combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living (GiraffPlus)
Available from: 2014-09-09 Created: 2015-02-09 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Hultgren Hörnquist, E., Nilsson, K., Andersson, T., Tidefelt, U. & Lidskog, M. (2011). Building a PBL-based integrated curriculum for a new medical school in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at Celebrating the Past and Embracing the Future: Evolution and Innovation in Problem-based Larning, Conference, Grange-Over-Sands, UK, March 30-31, 2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building a PBL-based integrated curriculum for a new medical school in Sweden
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2011 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24440 (URN)
Conference
Celebrating the Past and Embracing the Future: Evolution and Innovation in Problem-based Larning, Conference, Grange-Over-Sands, UK, March 30-31, 2011
Available from: 2012-08-15 Created: 2012-08-15 Last updated: 2018-02-05Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, M., Löfmark, A. & Ahlström, G. (2009). Learning through participating on an interprofessional training ward. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 23(5), 486-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning through participating on an interprofessional training ward
2009 (English)In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 486-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Learning in clinical education can be understood as a process of becoming a legitimate participant in the relevant context. Interprofessional training wards (IPTWs) are designed to give students from educational programmes in health and social care a realistic experience of collaboration for the purpose of developing teamwork skills. IPTWs have been found to be appreciated by the students and to influence students' understanding of each other's professions. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the students' learning on an interprofessional training ward in care for older persons through focusing on the students' ways of participating in the communities of practice on the ward. A case study design was chosen. Multiple data sources were used. The findings show that the students engaged as active participants in the care. At the same time there was sometimes a discrepancy between on the one hand expectations and goals, on the other hand actual participation. There were difficulties in making the training relevant for all the student groups involved. The findings indicate that in the planning of interprofessional education the choice of setting and learning situations is crucial with regard to the learning that will occur.

Keywords
Interprofessional education, community of practice, training ward, elderly care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12291 (URN)10.1080/13561820902921878 (DOI)000270589600008 ()19657936 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77958166746 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-10-21 Created: 2010-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, M., Löfmark, A. & Ahlström, G. (2008). Learning about each other: Students' conceptions before and after interprofessional education on a training ward. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 22(5), 521-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning about each other: Students' conceptions before and after interprofessional education on a training ward
2008 (English)In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 521-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In interprofessional work the striving of the members of each profession to establish their own positive in-group identity can be a source of conflict and have a negative effect on care. To counteract this, interprofessional training wards (IPTWs) have been developed in Sweden. The aim of the present study was to investigate similarities and differences in how student nurses, student occupational therapists and student social workers perceived their own and the other two professions before and after clinical education on an IPTW. Sixteen students were interviewed before and after the training on an IPTW in municipal care for older people in Sweden. A coding scheme developed in an earlier study was used in the analysis of the interviews. The findings indicate that there are changes in the students' stereotyped views, enhancing understanding of each other's professions after three weeks' clinical education on the IPTW. In some areas, however, there are still discrepancies between the description of own profession and the others' understanding of this profession that need to be confronted. In interprofessional training during education in social and health care there needs to be a balance between on the one hand the particular professional identity, on the other the shared identity implied by membership of the health-care team focusing on a common goal.

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3010 (URN)10.1080/13561820802168471 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-10-15 Created: 2008-10-15 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, M. (2008). Learning with, from and about each other: interprofessional education on a training ward in municipal care for older persons. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning with, from and about each other: interprofessional education on a training ward in municipal care for older persons
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this thesis was to describe and evaluate interprofessional education on an interprofessional training ward in municipal care for older persons. Interprofessional education has for some years now been proposed as a means to meet the call for effective collaboration, co-ordination and quality in health and social care. On the interprofessional training ward considered in this thesis, stu-dents from nursing, occupational therapy and social work programmes worked together for three weeks to learn with, from and about each other.

In the first study (I) students’ perceptions and attitudes concerning the training on the ward were studied. An attitude questionnaire and a retrospective goal-fulfilment questionnaire were distributed to all students. Non-parametric statistics were used for the quantitative analysis, and qualitative content analysis for the qualitative parts. The results showed that the students had positive attitudes to-wards the training ward and in most respects the learning goals set up for the course were considered to have been met.

In Studies II and III the focus was on students’ knowledge and understanding of their own and the others’ professions. Sixteen students were interviewed before and after. In the analysis of the interviews a phenomenographic approach was used. The findings showed a variation from simplistic conceptions of the profes-sions in terms of tasks to more complex conceptions in terms of the profession’s knowledge, responsibility and values. Differences in the ways professions were described concerning their professional stance towards the patients were espe-cially accentuated. The comparison between before and after indicated that there were changes in the students’ views. In some areas, however, there remained dis-crepancies between students’ understanding of their own profession and the oth-ers’ understanding of this profession. To promote mutual agreement on each other’s role this needs to be given careful consideration.

In the fourth study (IV) the focus was on the students’ participation in the community of practice on the ward, and the findings reveal an ambivalent picture of this participation (and thus of their learning). The students collaborated in the care of the patients. However, they sometimes experienced a gap between expec-tations and reality with regard to both the profession-specific and the interprofes-sional training on the ward: what they had to do was sometimes felt to be be-neath their qualifications and irrelevant to the programme of education they were pursuing. This applied to all three groups, but especially student social workers.

Interprofessional training wards can promote interprofessional learning, but it is crucial that setting should be right: it needs to be realistic for all the students involved, offering relevant profession-specific and interprofessional tasks and situations where the students can develop skills in collaborative, patient-centred care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2008. p. 82
Series
Örebro Studies in Care Sciences, ISSN 1652-1153 ; 20
Keywords
Interprofessional education, learning, health and social care, undergraduate, training ward, older persons, occupational therapy, nursing, social work, attitudes, phenomenography, social identity, community of practice
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2517 (URN)978-91-7668-632-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-11-14, HSP 2, Prismahuset, Örebro universitet, Örebro, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-10-15 Created: 2008-10-15 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, M., Löfmark, A. & Ahlström, G. (2008). Students' learning experiences from interprofessional collaboration on a training ward in municipal care. Learning in Health and Social Care, 7(3), 134-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' learning experiences from interprofessional collaboration on a training ward in municipal care
2008 (English)In: Learning in Health and Social Care, ISSN 1473-6853, E-ISSN 1473-6861, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 134-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One way to offer students pursuing health and social care programmes realistic experiences of teamwork is interprofessional training wards where students from different educational programmes learn teamwork by working together. In the present study, a training ward in municipal care for older people was evaluated. Students from occupational therapy, nursing and social work programmes worked together on the ward for 3 weeks to learn with, from and about each other. The aim of the study was to compare students' attitudes towards practice on a training ward before and after and to evaluate goal fulfilment after 3 weeks' interprofessional education on a training ward. An attitude questionnaire was distributed to all students before and after their time on the ward, supplemented with a retrospective goal-fulfilment questionnaire afterwards. The results show that the collaborative, social experience the training ward offers was appreciated by the students and in most respects, met the learning goals set up for the course. The most important learning experience was working together in a real-life setting. However, there are some issues to take into consideration when planning and developing training wards. The setting needs to be realistic and relevant in relation to future roles for all of the student groups involved. The value and purpose of engaging together in basic patient care needs to be the subject of further investigation. When it comes to fostering competent team-workers, training wards seem to be one way forward. But to fully understand the challenges and difficulties involved in planning these wards, the learning achieved must be understood in the context of the setting as a whole, in all its aspects.

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3008 (URN)10.1111/j.1473-6861.2008.00181.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-10-15 Created: 2008-10-15 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, M., Löfmark, A. & Ahlström, G. (2007). Interprofessional education on a training ward for older people: Students' conceptions of nurses, occupational therapists and social workers. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 21(4), 387-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interprofessional education on a training ward for older people: Students' conceptions of nurses, occupational therapists and social workers
2007 (English)In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 387-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Collaboration between professionals in health and social care is essential to meet the needs of the patient. The collaboration is dependent on knowledge and understanding of each other's roles. One means of improving communication and collaboration among professionals is interprofessional education. The aim of this study was to describe the variation in how students in nursing, occupational therapy and social work perceived their own and the other professions. Over a three-week period two interviews were conducted with each of 16 students who were on an interprofessional training ward for older people in a municipal setting in Sweden. A phenomenographical approach was used in the analysis of the interviews. The findings showed great variation in how the students perceived the professions, from simplistic in terms of tasks to a more complex conception in terms of knowledge, responsibility and values. Differences in the ways professions were described concerning their professional stance towards the patients were especially accentuated. The findings indicate that the students need opportunities for reflection on and scrutiny of each other's beliefs and knowledge. The influence of interprofessional education involving reflection on the different health-care professions needs to be explored in future research.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3009 (URN)10.1080/13561820701349420 (DOI)17654156 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-10-15 Created: 2008-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
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