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Antonson, Sivert
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Antonson, S., Danermark, B. & Lundström, I. (2006). Importance of social support for hard-of-hearing students in pursuing their "educational careers". Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, 8(4), 298-316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance of social support for hard-of-hearing students in pursuing their "educational careers"
2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 298-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to describe different processes in what is termed the “educational career” of hard-of-hearing students. The data comprises narratives from 30 hard-of-hearing former students representing four groups: students from a special school who continued to university education or to employment; students from ordinary schools who continued to university education or to employment. The results indicate that support within the educational experience is of great importance and the social support provided by parents is of crucial importance for a student's educational trajectory or career. This support, in combination with an adjusted school environment, seems to greatly diminish the importance of the hearing impairment. The conclusion is that hard-of-hearing students should not necessarily choose a special school just because of the impairment itself. When the needs of these students are met, there seem to be more accentuated mechanisms in ordinary educational settings than in special schools that promote post-secondary education.

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Disability Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6414 (URN)10.1080/15017410600874762 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-04-29 Created: 2009-04-29 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Danermark, B., Antonson, S. & Lundström, I. (2001). Social inclusion and career development: transition from upper secondary school to work or post-secondary education among hard of hearing students. Scandinavian Audiology, 30(2), 120-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social inclusion and career development: transition from upper secondary school to work or post-secondary education among hard of hearing students
2001 (English)In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the decision process and to analyse the mechanisms involved in the transition from upper secondary education to post-secondary education or the labour market. Sixteen students with sensorioneural hearing loss were selected. Among these eight of the students continued to university and eight did not. Twenty-five per cent of the students were women and the average age was 28 years. The investigation was conducted about 5 years after graduation from the upper secondary school. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. The results showed that none of the students came from a family where any or both of the parents had a university or comparable education. The differences in choice between the two groups cannot be explained in terms of social inheritance. Our study indicates that given normal intellectual capacity the level of the hearing loss seems to have no predictive value regarding future educational performance and academic career. The conclusion is that it is of great importance that a hearing impaired pupil with normal intellectual capacity is encouraged and guided to choose an upper secondary educational programme which is orientated towards post-secondary education (instead of a narrow vocational programme). Additional to their hearing impairment and related educational problems, hard of hearing students have much more difficulty than normal hearing peers in coping with changes in intentions and goals regarding their educational career during their upper secondary education.

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Disability Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6707 (URN)
Available from: 2009-05-11 Created: 2009-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
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