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Li, Shaoshan
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Kalbina, I., Li, S., Kalbin, G., Björn, L. O. & Strid, Å. (2008). Two separate UV-B radiation wavelength regions control expression of different molecular markers in Arabidopsis thaliana. Functional Plant Biology, 35(3), 222-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two separate UV-B radiation wavelength regions control expression of different molecular markers in Arabidopsis thaliana
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2008 (English)In: Functional Plant Biology, ISSN 1445-4408, E-ISSN 1445-4416, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 222-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fluence-response curves were obtained at nine wavelengths in the interval 280-360 nm for mRNA transcripts of four molecular markers induced by ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation in Arabidopsis thaliana: CHS (encoding chalcone synthase), PDX1.3 (encoding an enzyme involved in formation of pyridoxine), MEB5.2 (encoding a protein with unknown function but which is strongly up-regulated by UV-B), and LHCB1*3 (encoding a chlorophyll a/b binding protein). Intact Arabidopsis plants were irradiated for 3h using a high intensity deuterium radiation source and narrow bandwith filters (Kalbin et al. 2005, J. Biochem. Biophys. Meth. 65, 1-12) without supplementary PAR. The results obtained suggest the existence of two distinct UV-B signal responses: one sensitive between 300 and 310 nm and the other sensitive around 280-290 nm. Among the investigated molecular markers, CHS and PDX1.3 were regulated through the chromophore absorbing around 300 nm, whereas MEB5.2 and LHCB1*3 were regulated through the chromophore absorbing at 280-290 nm. The results obtained show that at least two signal transduction pathways exist that regulate gene expression as a result of absorption of UV-B radiation in plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Collinwood VIC: CSIRO, 2008
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Natural Sciences Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4629 (URN)10.1071/FP07197 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-10-14 Created: 2008-10-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Li, S. & Strid, Å. (2005). Anthocyanin accumulation and changes in CHS and PR-5 gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after removal of the inflorescence stem (decapitation). Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), 43(6), 521-525
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anthocyanin accumulation and changes in CHS and PR-5 gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after removal of the inflorescence stem (decapitation)
2005 (English)In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 521-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthocyanin accumulation occurs in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana within 8 days after removal of the inflorescence stem. Expression of stress-induced genes CHS and PR-5 was strongly up-regulated by stem removal, and was highest on day 4 after decapitation. These levels were 10 and 5 times higher than in the control, respectively. No obvious difference was found in expression of LHCB, MEB5.2, or PYROA genes following stem removal. We demonstrate that removing the inflorescence stem triggers events in Arabidopsis, including pigment accumulation and changes in gene expression of a subset of stress-induced genes, in a tissue distant from the wound site.

Keywords
Anthocyanins/*biosynthesis, Arabidopsis/growth & development/*metabolism, Gene Expression Regulation; Plant, Plant Leaves/growth & development/metabolism
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4138 (URN)10.1016/j.plaphy.2005.05.004 (DOI)15993620 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-11-06 Created: 2007-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Kalbin, G., Li, S., Olsman, H., Pettersson, M., Engwall, M. & Strid, Å. (2005). Effects of UV-B in biological and chemical systems: equipment for wavelength dependence determination. Journal of Biochemical and Biophysical Methods, 65(1), 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of UV-B in biological and chemical systems: equipment for wavelength dependence determination
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2005 (English)In: Journal of Biochemical and Biophysical Methods, ISSN 0165-022X, E-ISSN 1872-857X, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The thinning of the stratospheric ozone layer has prompted a large number of studies of UV-B-induced effects in biological and chemical systems. The wavelength dependency of such effects is of interest from mechanistic, physiological or economic points of view. Here, we describe an apparatus for determining the wavelength dependency of UV-B effects in biological and chemical systems. The apparatus consists of a high intensity UV radiation source and narrow bandpass filters to produce UV radiation in even intervals (between 280 and 360 nm). The usefulness of the equipment is demonstrated in two different systems: 1) Chalcone synthase (CHS) gene is up-regulated by UV-B radiation. Therefore quantitative analysis of the CHS gene expression was chosen in the present investigation for studies of the wavelength dependency of gene expression regulation in plants. Maximum induction of CHS expression was found at 300 nm with a 12-fold induction compared with the control; 2) The wavelength dependency of formation of dioxin-like photoproducts from the brominated flame retardant decabrominated diphenyl ether (DeBDE) is described. This is an example of UV-B-induced conversion of non-toxic species into a number of products of which some may be toxic in the environment. In the UV interval studied, the highest dioxin-like activity was found in the sample irradiated at 330 nm and therefore this wavelength is most important for the mechanism involved in photoconversion of DeBDE.

Keywords
Arabidopsis/growth & development/*radiation effects, Cell Culture Techniques/*instrumentation/methods, Cell Survival/radiation effects, Dioxins/*chemistry/*radiation effects, Dose-Response Relationship; Radiation, Equipment Design, Equipment Failure Analysis, Escherichia coli/physiology/*radiation effects, Radiation Dosage, Radiometry/*instrumentation/methods, Ultraviolet Rays
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4134 (URN)10.1016/j.jbbm.2005.09.001 (DOI)16256203 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-11-12 Created: 2008-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
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