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Wretenberg, Per
Publications (10 of 54) Show all publications
Jackwert, K., Holmér, M., Hallongren, M., Asmar, T., Wretenberg, P. & Andersson, Å. G. (2024). Agreement between Clinical Frailty Scale-scores based on information from patient interviews and Clinical Frailty Scale-scores based on information from medical records: a cross sectional study. BMC Geriatrics, 24(1), Article ID 570.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreement between Clinical Frailty Scale-scores based on information from patient interviews and Clinical Frailty Scale-scores based on information from medical records: a cross sectional study
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2024 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Frailty is an age-related condition with increased risk for adverse health outcomes. Assessing frailty according to the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) based on data from medical records is useful for previously unassessed patients, but the validity of such scores in exclusively geriatric populations and in patients with dementia is relatively unknown.

METHODS: Patients admitted for the first time to one of two geriatric wards at Örebro University hospital between January 1st - December 31st, 2021, were included in this study if they had been appointed a CFS-score by anamnestic interview (CFSI) at admission. CFS scores based on medical records (CFSR) were appointed by a single medical student, who was blinded to the CFSI score. Score-agreement was evaluated with quadratic weighted Cohen's kappa (κ).

RESULTS: In total, 145 patients between the age of 55-101 were included in the study. The CFSR and CFSI scores agreed perfectly in 102 cases (0.7, 95% CI 0.65-0.77). There was no significant difference regarding age, sex, comorbidity, or number of patients diagnosed with dementia between the patients with complete agreement and the patients whose scores did not agree. Agreement between the scores was substantial, κ = 0.66, 95% CI 0.53-0.80.

CONCLUSIONS: CFS scores based on information from medical records can be generated with substantial agreement to CFS scores based on in-person anamnestic interviews. A dementia diagnosis does not influence the agreement between the scores. Therefore, these scores are a useful tool for assessing frailty in geriatric patients who previously lack a frailty assessment, both in clinical practice and future research. The results support previous findings, but larger studies are warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
Keywords
Agreement, Clinical frailty scale, Dementia, Frailty, Geriatric, Medical records
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-114610 (URN)10.1186/s12877-024-05160-5 (DOI)38956490 (PubMedID)
Funder
Örebro UniversityRegion Örebro County, OLL 961450
Available from: 2024-07-04 Created: 2024-07-04 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Wildeman, P., Rolfson, O., Wretenberg, P., Nåtman, J., Gordon, M., Söderquist, B. & Lindgren, V. (2024). Effect of a national infection control programme in Sweden on prosthetic joint infection incidence following primary total hip arthroplasty: a cohort study. BMJ Open, 14(4), Article ID e076576.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of a national infection control programme in Sweden on prosthetic joint infection incidence following primary total hip arthroplasty: a cohort study
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2024 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e076576Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a serious complication following total hip arthroplasty (THA) entailing increased mortality, decreased quality of life and high healthcare costs.The primary aim was to investigate whether the national project: Prosthesis Related Infections Shall be Stopped (PRISS) reduced PJI incidence after primary THA; the secondary aim was to evaluate other possible benefits of PRISS, such as shorter time to diagnosis.

DESIGN: Cohort study.

SETTING: In 2009, a nationwide, multidisciplinary infection control programme was launched in Sweden, PRISS, which aimed to reduce the PJI burden by 50%.

PARTICIPANTS: We obtained data on patients undergoing primary THA from the Swedish Arthroplasty Registry 2012-2014, (n=45 723 patients, 49 946 THAs). Using personal identity numbers, this cohort was matched with the Swedish Prescribed Drug Registry. Medical records of patients with ≥4 weeks' antibiotic consumption were reviewed to verify PJI diagnosis (n=2240, 2569 THAs).

RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of PJI following the PRISS Project was 1.2% (95% CI 1.1% to 1.3%) as compared with 0.9% (95% CI 0.8% to 1.0%) before. Cox regression models for the PJI incidence post-PRISS indicates there was no statistical significance difference versus pre-PRISS (HR 1.1 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.3)). There was similar time to PJI diagnosis after the PRISS Project 24 vs 23 days (p=0.5).

CONCLUSIONS: Despite the comprehensive nationwide PRISS Project, Swedish PJI incidence was higher after the project and time to diagnosis remained unchanged. Factors contributing to PJI, such as increasing obesity, higher American Society of Anesthesiology class and more fractures as indications, explain the PJI increase among primary THA patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Epidemiology, Hip, Infection control, Primary Prevention
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-113433 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2023-076576 (DOI)001209953800001 ()38684253 (PubMedID)
Funder
Örebro UniversityRegion Örebro County, OLL- 917121
Note

The funding organisations, Research Committee of Örebro University, Region Örebro County (grant no: OLL- 917121), Sweden and Patientforsakringen LOF, Sweden (grant no: NA) provided financial support for the study.

Available from: 2024-04-30 Created: 2024-04-30 Last updated: 2024-06-05Bibliographically approved
Nerelius, F., Sigmundsson, F. G., Karlén, N., Wretenberg, P. & Joelson, A. (2024). Patient-reported Outcome after Surgical Evacuation of Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematomas at One-year Follow-up. Spine, 49(10), 701-707
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient-reported Outcome after Surgical Evacuation of Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematomas at One-year Follow-up
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2024 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 701-707Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the National Swedish Spine Register (Swespine).

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of symptomatic spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) requiring reoperation on one-year patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in a large cohort of patients treated surgically for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS).

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Studies exploring the outcomes of reoperations after SSEH are scarce and often lack validated outcome measures. As SSEH is considered a serious complication, understanding of the outcome following hematoma evacuation is important.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: After retrieving data from 2007 to 2017 from Swespine, we included all patients with LSS without concomitant spondylolisthesis who were treated surgically with decompression without fusion. Patients with evacuated SSEH were identified in the registry. Back/leg pain numerical rating scales (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and EQ VAS were used for outcome assessment. PROMs before and one-year after decompression surgery were compared between evacuated patients and all other patients. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine if hematoma evacuation predicted inferior one-year PROM scores.

RESULTS: A total of 113 patients with an evacuated SSEH were compared with 19527 patients with no evacuation. One-year after decompression surgery, both groups showed significant improvement in all PROMs. When comparing the two groups' one-year improvement there were no significant differences in any PROM. The proportion of patients achieving the minimum important change was not significantly different for any PROM. Multivariate linear regression found that hematoma evacuation significantly predicted inferior one-year ODI (β=4.35, P=0.043), but it was not a significant predictor of inferior NRS Back (β=0.50, P=0.105), NRS Leg (β=0.41, P=0.221), or EQ VAS (β=-1.97, P=0.470). CONCLUSIONS: A surgically evacuated SSEH does not affect outcome in terms of back/leg pain or health-related quality of life. Commonly used PROM surveys may not capture neurologic deficits associated with SSEH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2024
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-106100 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000004720 (DOI)37235784 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-05-29 Created: 2023-05-29 Last updated: 2024-05-02Bibliographically approved
Forssten, M. P., Mohammad Ismail, A., Ioannidis, I., Wretenberg, P., Borg, T., Cao, Y., . . . Mohseni, S. (2023). A nationwide analysis on the interaction between frailty and beta-blocker therapy in hip fracture patients. European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, 49(3), 1485-1497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A nationwide analysis on the interaction between frailty and beta-blocker therapy in hip fracture patients
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2023 (English)In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 1485-1497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Hip fracture patients, who are often frail, continue to be a challenge for healthcare systems with a high postoperative mortality rate. While beta-blocker therapy (BBt) has shown a strong association with reduced postoperative mortality, its effect in frail patients has yet to be determined. This study's aim is to investigate how frailty, measured using the Orthopedic Hip Frailty Score (OFS), modifies the effect of preadmission beta-blocker therapy on mortality in hip fracture patients.

METHODS: This retrospective register-based study included all adult patients in Sweden who suffered a traumatic hip fracture and subsequently underwent surgery between 2008 and 2017. Treatment effect was evaluated using the absolute risk reduction (ARR) in 30-day postoperative mortality when comparing patients with (BBt+) and without (BBt-) ongoing BBt. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) was used to reduce potential confounding when examining the treatment effect. Patients were stratified based on their OFS (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) and the treatment effect was also assessed within each stratum.

RESULTS: A total of 127,305 patients were included, of whom 39% had BBt. When IPTW was performed, there were no residual differences in observed baseline characteristics between the BBt+ and BBt- groups, across all strata. This analysis found that there was a stepwise increase in the ARRs for each additional point on the OFS. Non-frail BBt+ patients (OFS 0) exhibited an ARR of 2.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-2.4%, p < 0.001], while the most frail BBt+ patients (OFS 5) had an ARR of 24% [95% CI 18-30%, p < 0.001], compared to BBt- patients within the same stratum.

CONCLUSION: Beta-blocker therapy is associated with a reduced risk of 30-day postoperative mortality in frail hip fracture patients, with a greater effect being observed with higher Orthopedic Hip Frailty Scores.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Urban und Vogel Medien und Medizin Verlagsgesellsc, 2023
Keywords
Beta-blocker therapy, Frailty, Hip fracture, Inverse probability of treatment weighting, Mortality, Orthopedic Hip Frailty Score
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-103177 (URN)10.1007/s00068-023-02219-7 (DOI)000913478200001 ()36633610 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85146172097 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Örebro University
Available from: 2023-01-23 Created: 2023-01-23 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
Reiser, D., Sagerfors, M., Wretenberg, P., Pettersson, K. & Fischer, P. (2023). Clinical, Radiographic, and Patient-Perceived Outcome After Radial Hemi-Wrist Arthroplasty With a New Implant: 20 Cases With 5-Year Follow-up. Hand (New York, N.Y.), Article ID 15589447231151427.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical, Radiographic, and Patient-Perceived Outcome After Radial Hemi-Wrist Arthroplasty With a New Implant: 20 Cases With 5-Year Follow-up
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2023 (English)In: Hand (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 1558-9447, article id 15589447231151427Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Distal component loosening is a common mode of failure in total wrist arthroplasty (TWA). A radial hemi-wrist arthroplasty (RHWA) has the potential to avoid problems related to the distal component in TWA. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical outcomes following surgical treatment with a new RHWA design.

METHODS: In this pilot study of 20 consecutive RHWAs, patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively for range of motion, grip strength, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores, and functional scoring using Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Radiographs were analyzed at 12 months and 5 years (mean, 5.1 years) postoperatively.

RESULTS: A total of 46 secondary surgeries were undertaken in 16 wrists, including 7 revisions. Another 6 patients are waiting for revision to radiocarpal arthrodesis. In non-revised patients, the DASH and PRWE scores improved, and wrist range of motion remained largely unchanged except for wrist flexion, which decreased. The VAS pain score during activity was reduced, and hand grip strength remained largely unchanged.

CONCLUSIONS: The new implant resulted in improved functional scoring and improved VAS pain scores in non-revised patients, but many cases needed secondary surgery due to persistent pain. The high revision rate is a major concern, and further use of the implant in its current form cannot be recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Arthritis, hemi-wrist arthroplasty, osteoarthritis
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-104112 (URN)10.1177/15589447231151427 (DOI)36752076 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147680622 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-09 Created: 2023-02-09 Last updated: 2024-03-22Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, E., Olivecrona, H., Wretenberg, P. & Sagerfors, M. (2023). CT-Based Micromotion Analysis After Locking Plate Fixation of AO Type C Distal Radius Fractures. Indian Journal of Orthopaedics, 57(12), 2031-2039
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CT-Based Micromotion Analysis After Locking Plate Fixation of AO Type C Distal Radius Fractures
2023 (English)In: Indian Journal of Orthopaedics, ISSN 0019-5413, E-ISSN 1998-3727, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 2031-2039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Volar locking plate fixation (VLPF) is the most common method for operative fixation of distal radius fractures (DRF). The dorsal ulnar corner (DUC) can be difficult to stabilize as the fragment is small and not exposed when using the volar approach. The purpose of this study was to study fracture fragment migration after VLPF of AO type C DRF, using a volume registration technique of paired CT scans with special focus on the DUC fragment.

Materials and Methods: This pilot study included ten patients with AO type C DRF, all operated with VLPF. The primary outcome was radiographic outcome. Postoperative and 1-year scans were compared and analyzed. Fragment migration was assessed with CT-based micromotion analysis (CTMA), a software technique used for volume registration of paired CT scans.

Results: All plates were stable over time. Two patients showed signs of screw movement (0.2-0.35 mm and 0.35- > 1 mm respectively). Postoperative reduction was maintained, and there was no fragment migration at the 1-year follow-up except for one case with increased dorsal tilt. The DUC fragment was found in 8/10 cases, fixated in 7/8 cases, and not dislocated in any case at the 1-year follow-up.

Conclusion: The CTMA results indicate that variable-angle VLPF after AO type C DRF can yield and maintain a highly stable reduction of the fracture fragments. The DUC fragment remained stable regardless of the number of screws through the fragment. CT volume registration can be a valuable tool in the detailed assessment of fracture fragment migration following volar plate fixation of DRFs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Articular, Distal radius fractures, Computed tomography, Dorsal ulnar corner, Internal fixation, Micromotion analysis, Volar locking plate, Outcomes, Trauma, Wrist
National Category
Surgery Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109913 (URN)10.1007/s43465-023-01020-3 (DOI)001098629300001 ()38026840 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175634215 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Örebro UniversityRegion Örebro County
Available from: 2023-11-29 Created: 2023-11-29 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, E., Olivecrona, H., Wretenberg, P. & Sagerfors, M. (2023). CT-based micromotion analysis of fracture fragment migration after locking plate fixation of AO type C distal radius fractures. In: FESSH-EFSHT 2023 Congress: Abstract Book. Paper presented at FESSH-EFSHT 2023 Congress, Rimini, Italy, 10-13 May, 2023 (pp. 22-23). , Article ID A-0047.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CT-based micromotion analysis of fracture fragment migration after locking plate fixation of AO type C distal radius fractures
2023 (English)In: FESSH-EFSHT 2023 Congress: Abstract Book, 2023, p. 22-23, article id A-0047Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Surgery Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109599 (URN)
Conference
FESSH-EFSHT 2023 Congress, Rimini, Italy, 10-13 May, 2023
Available from: 2023-11-06 Created: 2023-11-06 Last updated: 2023-11-06Bibliographically approved
Jakobsson, H., Lundqvist, E., Wretenberg, P. & Sagerfors, M. (2023). Pulp-to-palm distance after plate fixation of a distal radius fracture corresponds to functional outcome. Archives of physiotherapy, 13(1), Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pulp-to-palm distance after plate fixation of a distal radius fracture corresponds to functional outcome
2023 (English)In: Archives of physiotherapy, E-ISSN 2057-0082, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Several factors can influence the outcome after a distal radius fracture (DRF). The aim of this study was to assess whether postoperative pulp-to-palm (PTP) distance correlated with functional outcomes after plate fixation of DRF. MATERIALS &

METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effects of plate fixation in patients with type-C fractures. Subjects (N = 135) were divided into 2 groups based on PTP distance (equal to or higher than 0 cm) at 4 weeks postoperatively. Outcome measures were collected prospectively at 3, 6 and 12 months and included Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), Quick Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) scores, wrist range of motion (ROM), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores, and hand grip strength.

RESULTS: Overall, at 3 and 6 months patients with PTP > 0 cm had significantly worse outcomes (PRWE, QuickDASH, wrist ROM) than those with PTP =0 cm. At 12 months, QuickDASH and wrist ROM were still significantly worse. In the volar-plating subgroup, patients with PTP > 0 cm had significantly worse wrist ROM and grip strength at 3 months, but no significant differences were found in subsequent follow-ups. In the combined-plating group, patients with PTP > 0 cm had significantly worse QuickDASH, wrist ROM and grip strength at 3 months. At 6 and 12 months, wrist ROM was still significantly worse.

CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of PTP distance appears to be useful to identify patients likely to have worse outcome after plating of a DRF. This could be a tool to improve the allocation of hand rehabilitation resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Distal radius fracture, Outcome, Patient-related outcome measures, Plating, Pulp-to-palm distance, Rehabilitation, Wrist function
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105118 (URN)10.1186/s40945-023-00159-4 (DOI)000999922000001 ()36941730 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150932411 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-22 Created: 2023-03-22 Last updated: 2023-06-19Bibliographically approved
Forssten, M. P., Mohammad Ismail, A., Ioannidis, I., Wretenberg, P., Borg, T., Cao, Y., . . . Mohseni, S. (2023). The mortality burden of frailty in hip fracture patients: a nationwide retrospective study of cause-specific mortality. European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, 49(3), 1467-1475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The mortality burden of frailty in hip fracture patients: a nationwide retrospective study of cause-specific mortality
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2023 (English)In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 1467-1475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Frailty is a condition characterized by a reduced ability to adapt to external stressors because of a reduced physiologic reserve, which contributes to the high risk of postoperative mortality in hip fracture patients. This study aims to investigate how frailty is associated with the specific causes of mortality in hip fracture patients.

Methods: All adult patients in Sweden who suffered a traumatic hip fracture and underwent surgery between 2008 and 2017 were eligible for inclusion. The Orthopedic Hip Frailty Score (OFS) was used to classify patients as non-frail (OFS 0), pre-frail (OFS 1), and frail (OFS & GE; 2). The association between the degree of frailty and both all-cause and cause-specific mortality was determined using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors and presented using incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for potential sources of confounding.

Results: After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 127,305 patients remained for further analysis. 23.9% of patients were non-frail, 27.7% were pre-frail, and 48.3% were frail. Frail patients exhibited a 4 times as high risk of all-cause mortality 30 days [adj. IRR (95% CI): 3.80 (3.36-4.30), p < 0.001] and 90 days postoperatively [adj. IRR (95% CI): 3.88 (3.56-4.23), p < 0.001] as non-frail patients. Of the primary causes of 30-day mortality, frailty was associated with a tripling in the risk of cardiovascular [adj. IRR (95% CI): 3.24 (2.64-3.99), p < 0.001] and respiratory mortality [adj. IRR (95% CI): 2.60 (1.96-3.45), p < 0.001] as well as a five-fold increase in the risk of multiorgan failure [adj. IRR (95% CI): 4.99 (3.95-6.32), p < 0.001].

Conclusion: Frailty is associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality at 30 and 90 days postoperatively. Across both timepoints, cardiovascular and respiratory events along with multiorgan failure were the most prevalent causes of mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Frailty, Hip fracture, Postoperative mortality, Cause-specific mortality, Poisson regression
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102991 (URN)10.1007/s00068-022-02204-6 (DOI)000904003600001 ()36571633 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144836759 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Örebro University
Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Ighani Arani, P., Wretenberg, P., Stenberg, E., Ottosson, J. & W-Dahl, A. (2023). Total knee arthroplasty and bariatric surgery: change in BMI and risk of revision depending on sequence of surgery. BMC Surgery, 23(1), Article ID 53.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Total knee arthroplasty and bariatric surgery: change in BMI and risk of revision depending on sequence of surgery
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2023 (English)In: BMC Surgery, E-ISSN 1471-2482, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients with obesity have a higher risk of complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We investigated the change in weight 1 and 2 years post-Bariatric Surgery (BS) in patients that had undergone both TKA and BS as well as the risk of revision after TKA based on if BS was performed before or after the TKA.

METHODS: Patients who had undergone BS within 2 years before or after TKA were identified from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Register (SOReg) and the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR) between 2007 and 2019 and 2009 and 2020, respectively. The cohort was divided into two groups; patients who underwent TKA before BS (TKA-BS) and patients who underwent BS before TKA (BS-TKA). Multilinear regression analysis and a Cox proportional hazards model were used to analyze weight change after BS and the risk of revision after TKA.

RESULTS: Of the 584 patients included in the study, 119 patients underwent TKA before BS and 465 underwent BS before TKA. No association was detected between the sequence of surgery and total weight loss 1 and 2 years post-BS, - 0.1 (95% confidence interval (CI), - 1.7 to 1.5) and - 1.2 (95% CI, - 5.2 to 2.9), or the risk of revision after TKA [hazard ratio 1.54 (95% CI 0.5-4.5)].

CONCLUSION: The sequence of surgery in patients undergoing both BS and TKA does not appear to be associated with weight loss after BS or the risk of revision after TKA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Bariatric surgery, Gonathrosis, Obesity, Revision, Total knee arthroplasty
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-104889 (URN)10.1186/s12893-023-01951-6 (DOI)000947945000001 ()36899340 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85149961393 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-13 Created: 2023-03-13 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
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