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Beeckman, Dimitri, Visiting ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3080-8716
Publications (10 of 50) Show all publications
Van Hecke, A., Duprez, V., Pype, P., Beeckman, D. & Verhaeghe, S. (2020). Criteria for describing and evaluating training interventions in healthcare professions - CRe-DEPTH. Nurse Education Today, 84, Article ID 104254.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Criteria for describing and evaluating training interventions in healthcare professions - CRe-DEPTH
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2020 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 84, article id 104254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Descriptions of training intervention in healthcare include a lot of vagueness, leaving the reader in doubt about the intervention and the true value of the reported effects. A set of reporting criteria to improve the transparency and comprehensiveness in reporting training interventions in healthcare is recommended.

Objective: This study aimed to develop and content validate a set of reporting criteria for the development and evaluation of training interventions for healthcare professionals.

Method: The set of criteria was developed along three stages: (1) a literature review, (2) the design of the criteria, and (3) a Delphi and consensus meeting process with ten experts from different professional disciplines.

Results: The Criteria for Reporting on Development and Evaluation of Professional Training interventions in Healthcare (CRe-DEPTH) set was systematically developed and consisted of 12 items representing four categories: (1) development of the training, (2) characteristics of the training, (3) characteristics of the providers, and (4) assessment of the training outcomes. Each item has a detailed description to support its unambiguous interpretation.

Conclusions: The developed CRe-DEPTH reporting criteria guide high quality development, evaluation and reporting for complex training interventions, while preserving the flexibility to incorporate various teaching content or teaching methods. The Cre-DEPTH criteria will allow for detailed reporting on the training, its developmental process, as well as on the rationale for underlying choices, and will avoid non-reporting of training details.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Healthcare, Consensus, Guideline, Continuing education, Research report/standards, Training, Healthcare professionals
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79084 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2019.104254 (DOI)000501643800007 ()31689586 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074224261 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-15 Created: 2020-01-15 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Zwaenepoel, E., Van Hecke, A., Manderlier, B., Verhaeghe, S. & Beeckman, D. (2020). Pressure ulcer Cat. II-IV incidence on the CuroCell S.A.M. PRO powered reactive air support surface in a high-risk population: A multicentre cohort study in 12 Belgian nursing homes. International Wound Journal, 17(1), 124-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pressure ulcer Cat. II-IV incidence on the CuroCell S.A.M. PRO powered reactive air support surface in a high-risk population: A multicentre cohort study in 12 Belgian nursing homes
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2020 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The primary objective was to study pressure ulcer (PU) category II-IV (including suspected deep tissue injury and unstageable PUs) cumulative incidence and PU incidence density, in a 30day observation period, associated with the use of the CuroCell S.A.M. PRO powered reactive air support surface in nursing home residents at risk for PU development. Secondary objectives were to study (a) PU category I cumulative incidence and PU incidence density and (b) user (caregivers and residents) experiences and perceptions of comfort associated with the use of the support surface under study. A multicentre cohort study was set up in 37 care units of 12 Belgian nursing homes. The sample consisted of 191 residents at risk of PU development (Braden score ≤ 17). The cumulative PU incidence was 4.7% (n = 9). The PU incidence density was 1.7/1000 observation days (9 PU/5370 days). The experience and perceptions of comfort analysis revealed that the CuroCell S.A.M. PRO powered reactive air support surface was comfortable for daily use. The mode of action and the quietness of the pump function had a positive impact on sleep quality. Patient comfort and sleep quality are essential criteria in the selection of a support surface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2020
Keywords
Comfort, pressure ulcer, prevention, reactive air support surface, skin integrity
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77950 (URN)10.1111/iwj.13242 (DOI)000495597700001 ()31713351 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Care of Sweden, Tranemo, Sweden

Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Beeckman, D., Serraes, B., Anrys, C., Van Tiggelen, H., Van Hecke, A. & Verhaeghe, S. (2019). A multicentre prospective randomised controlled clinical trial comparing the effectiveness and cost of a static air mattress and alternating air pressure mattress to prevent pressure ulcers in nursing home residents. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 97, 105-113
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multicentre prospective randomised controlled clinical trial comparing the effectiveness and cost of a static air mattress and alternating air pressure mattress to prevent pressure ulcers in nursing home residents
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 97, p. 105-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Pressure ulcers are a global issue and substantial concern for healthcare systems. Various types of support surfaces that prevent pressure ulcer are available. Data about the effectiveness and cost of static air support surfaces and alternating air pressure mattresses is lacking.

Objectives: To compare the effectiveness and cost of static air support surfaces versus alternating air pressure support surfaces in a nursing home population at high risk for pressure ulcers.

Design: Prospective, multicentre, randomised controlled clinical, non-inferiority trial.

Setting: Twenty-six nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium.

Participants: A consecutive sample of 308 participants was selected based on the following eligibility criteria: high risk for pressure ulcer and/or with category 1 pressure ulcer, being bedbound and/or chair bound, aged > 65 years, and use of an alternating air pressure mattress.

Methods: The participants were allocated to the intervention group (n = 154) using static air support surfaces and the control group (n = 154) using alternating air pressure support surfaces. The main outcome measures were cumulative incidence and incidence density of the participants developing a new category II-IV pressure ulcer within a 14-day observation period, time to develop a new pressure ulcer, and purchase costs of the support surfaces.

Results: The intention-to-treat analysis revealed a significantly lower incidence of category II-IV pressure ulcer in the intervention group (n = 8/154, 5.2%) than in the control group (n = 18/154, 11.7%) (p = 0.04). The median time to develop a pressure ulcer was significantly longer in the intervention group (10.5 days, interquartile range [IQR]: 1-14) than in the control group (5.4 days, [IQR]: 1-12; p = 0.05). The probability to remain pressure ulcer free differed significantly between the two study groups (log-rank X-2 = 4.051, df =1, p = 0.04). The overall cost of the mattress was lower in the intervention group than in the control group.

Conclusions: A static air mattress was significantly more effective than an alternating air pressure mattress in preventing pressure ulcer in a high-risk nursing home population. Considering multiple lifespans and purchase costs, static air mattresses were more cost-effective than alternating air pressure mattresses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Alternating air pressure mattress, Cost, Effectiveness, Pressure ulcer, Prevention, Static air mattress overlay
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77443 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.05.015 (DOI)000488331000013 ()31234104 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Frontier Therapeutics Ltd., UK 

Available from: 2019-10-18 Created: 2019-10-18 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Theys, S., Lust, E., Heinen, M., Verhaeghe, S., Beeckman, D., Eeckloo, K., . . . Van Hecke, A. (2019). Barriers and enablers for the implementation of a hospital communication tool for patient participation: a qualitative study. Journal of Clinical Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers and enablers for the implementation of a hospital communication tool for patient participation: a qualitative study
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate potential barriers and enablers prior to the implementation of the Tell-us card.

BACKGROUND: Patient participation has the potential to improve quality of care and has a positive effect on health outcomes. In order to enhance participation of patients, adequate communication between patients, their relatives and healthcare professionals is vital. Communication is considered as a fundament of care according to the Fundamentals of Care Framework. A strategy to improve patient participation is the use of the Tell-us card; a communication tool that patients and relatives can use during hospitalization to point out what is important for them during their admission and before discharge. Investigating barriers and enablers is needed before implementation.

DESIGN: A qualitative study.

METHODS: Semi-structured, individual interviews with (head)nurses, nurse assistants and midwifes. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework analysis method. The COREQ checklist has been used.

RESULTS: The need to maintain control over care, reluctance to engage in in-depth conversations, fear of being seen as unprofessional by patients, fear of repercussions from physicians, the lack of insight in the meaning of patient participation, and the lack of appreciation of the importance of patient participation appeared to be majors barriers. Participants also elaborated on several prerequisites for successful implementation and regarded the cooperation of the multidisciplinary team as an essential enabler.

CONCLUSION: The identified barriers and enablers revealed that nurses and midwives are rather reluctant towards patient participation and actively facilitating that by using the Tell-us card communication tool.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: A number of issues will have to be factored into the implementation plan of the communication tool. Tailored implementation strategies will be crucial to overcome barriers and to accomplish a successful and sustainable implementation of the Tell-us card.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Science Ltd., 2019
Keywords
Communication, Fundamentals of Care, Hospital care, Nursing, Patient Participation, Qualitative study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76163 (URN)10.1111/jocn.15055 (DOI)31494999 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
LeBlanc, K., Campbell, K. E., Wood, E. & Beeckman, D. (2019). Best Practice Recommendations for Prevention and Management of Skin Tears in Aged Skin: An Overview. Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing (WOCN), 45(6), 540-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Best Practice Recommendations for Prevention and Management of Skin Tears in Aged Skin: An Overview
2019 (English)In: Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing (WOCN), ISSN 1071-5754, E-ISSN 1528-3976, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 540-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73158 (URN)10.1097/WON.0000000000000481 (DOI)000450892200012 ()30395131 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056280906 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Duprez, V., Vansteenkiste, M., Beeckman, D., Verhaeghe, S. & Van Hecke, A. (2019). Capturing motivating versus demotivating self-management support: Development and validation of a vignette-based tool grounded in Self-determination Theory. International Journal of Nursing Studies, Article ID S0020-7489(19)30125-7.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing motivating versus demotivating self-management support: Development and validation of a vignette-based tool grounded in Self-determination Theory
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, article id S0020-7489(19)30125-7Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The trend towards more active involvement of patients in the management of their chronic condition requires professionals to interact in a way that facilitates patients' autonomy and motivation. A self-assessment tool that measures simultaneously motivating and demotivating interaction styles in counselling chronic ill patients is currently not available.

OBJECTIVES: Grounded in Self-Determination Theory, this study aimed to develop and validate a self-report tool that captures healthcare professionals' motivating (i.e., autonomy-support and structure) and demotivating (i.e., control and chaos) interaction styles while supporting patients towards self-management.

METHODS: The Situations In Self-management support - HealthCare Professionals (SIS-HCP) was developed throughout a five-phased psychometric validation study with (1) construct definition, (2) development of the vignette-based questionnaire, (3) ecological validation and piloting, (4) psychometric evaluation (round 1) by multidimensional scaling analysis, and (5) psychometric evaluation (round 2) by internal and construct validity, and reliability testing procedures in 5 independent samples (total N = 1133), between August 2015 and March 2018.

RESULTS: Multidimensional scaling analysis provided evidence for a two-dimensional structure, with motivating, relative to demotivating counselling and high, relative to low, directive counselling representing the two axes. Four styles could be distinguished: autonomy-support (rather motivating and non-directive), structure (rather motivating & directive), control (rather demotivating & directive) and chaos (rather demotivating & non-directive) within self-management support. The SIS-HCP demonstrated good construct validity, and high internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

CONCLUSION: The SIS-HCP is a vignette-based tool, which allows to explore, in an integrative way, which motivating (i.e., autonomy-support and structure) and demotivating (i.e., control and chaos) styles healthcare professionals use when counselling patients living with a chronic illness. The SIS-HCP might enhance professionals' awareness of their (de)motivating counselling styles and the extent to which they promote ownership among patients. The SIS-HCP represents an interesting addition to existing instruments which measure what professionals do in the field of self-management support, and how confident they feel doing so. The thorough process of development and validation led to a theoretical underpinned tool, with the identified (de)motivating dimensions yielding strong psychometric properties. The SIS-HCP can be used as a reflective tool for professionals and for tailored training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Behavior rating scale, Counselling, Nursing, Patient participation, Patient-centered care, Psychometrics, Questionnaire design, Self-management, Validation studies
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77482 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.04.019 (DOI)31171288 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Vandewalle, J., Beeckman, D., Van Hecke, A., Debyser, B., Deproost, E. & Verhaeghe, S. (2019). Contact and communication with patients experiencing suicidal ideation: a qualitative study of nurses' perspectives. Journal of Advanced Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contact and communication with patients experiencing suicidal ideation: a qualitative study of nurses' perspectives
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: To uncover and understand the core elements of how nurses in psychiatric hospitals make contact with patients experiencing suicidal ideation.

DESIGN: A qualitative study based on the principles of grounded theory was performed.

METHODS: Nineteen nurses on wards of four psychiatric hospitals were interviewed between May 2017 and February 2018. The Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven was used to facilitate the constant comparison of data.

FINDINGS: Nurses make contact with patients experiencing suicidal ideation by 'creating conditions for open and genuine communication' while maintaining a focus on 'developing an accurate and meaningful picture of patients'. These interconnected core elements represent nurses' attention to relational processes like building trust as well as their predominant focus on assessing suicide risk. Nurses put other emphases in their contacts with patients depending on whether their approach is guided more by checking and controlling suicide risk or by acknowledging and connecting (with) the person.

CONCLUSION: The study enhances the conceptual understanding of how nurses on psychiatric wards can involve in compassionate and considerate contact and communication with patients experiencing suicidal ideation. These findings can be used to underpin the nurses' role in and contribution to suicide prevention.

IMPACT: The core elements 'creating conditions for open and genuine communication' while maintaining a focus on 'developing an accurate and meaningful picture of patients' can inform policies for nursing practice and education that aim to preserve and improve the capacity of nurses to involve in compassionate and considerate contact and communication with patients experiencing suicidal ideation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
Keywords
Communication, grounded theory, nurse-patient relationship, nursing, psychiatric hospitals, qualitative research, suicidal ideation, suicide
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74784 (URN)10.1111/jan.14113 (DOI)000478330900001 ()31222813 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Foundation Flanders  1150117N

Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Riviere, M., Dufoort, H., Van Hecke, A., Vandecasteele, T., Beeckman, D. & Verhaeghe, S. (2019). Core elements of the interpersonal care relationship between nurses and older patients without cognitive impairment during their stay at the hospital: A mixed-methods systematic review. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 92, 154-172
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Core elements of the interpersonal care relationship between nurses and older patients without cognitive impairment during their stay at the hospital: A mixed-methods systematic review
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 92, p. 154-172Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The fundamental importance of establishing an interpersonal care relationship for quality nursing care has been highlighted. However specific elements of the interpersonal care relationship of importance to older patients in the hospital have not been identified.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to explore and synthesise research findings regarding the elements of the interpersonal care relationship concept from the perspectives of older patients.

DESIGN: A systematic mixed-methods review.

DATA SOURCES: An extensive search was conducted up until October 2018 for articles without any publication date time limit in PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and CINAHL.

REVIEW METHODS: Primary studies were included if they concerned patients aged 65 years or older and their perspectives on the elements of the interpersonal care relationship with nurses. Inclusion was limited to patients without cognitive impairment who were admitted to an acute hospital setting. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme for qualitative studies, the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies and the Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool. Thematic analysis was used to structure the results of the included studies.

RESULTS: Of the 7596 studies found, 24 were included in this review. Twenty articles had a qualitative, three a quantitative and one a mixed methods design. Older patients consider dignity and respect as core values that need to be met in the interpersonal care relationship. Five core elements of the interpersonal care relationship were identified to meet these core values: elements related to caring behaviour and attitude, person-centred care, patient participation, communication and situational aspects. These core elements were structured according to three categories, identified in the literature, that determine the quality of the interpersonal care relationship: nurse-, older-patient-related elements and situational aspects.

CONCLUSIONS: The elements identified in this review can guide efforts to define the interpersonal care relationship between older patients and nurses. Nurses should be supported and motivated by education and practice to adapt their behaviour, attitudes and communication to meet older patients' expectations. Hospital management can also encourage nurses to communicate well. Investment in the current organisation of care is needed to improve nurses' work overload and presence. Further research is needed to clarify the underlying processes influencing the experience of the interpersonal care relationship from the perspectives of older patients, nurses, informal caregivers and hospital management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Aged, Hospitals, Nurse-patient relations, Nurses, Nursing, Review, Systematic review
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73540 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.02.004 (DOI)000465508800017 ()30826498 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062082704 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
De Meyer, D., Kottner, J., Beele, H., Schmitt, J., Lange, T., Van Hecke, A., . . . Beeckman, D. (2019). Delphi Procedure In Core Outcome Set Development: Rating Scale And Consensus Criteria Determined Outcome Selection. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 111, 23-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delphi Procedure In Core Outcome Set Development: Rating Scale And Consensus Criteria Determined Outcome Selection
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 0895-4356, E-ISSN 1878-5921, Vol. 111, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To compare two different rating scales within one Delphi study for defining consensus in core outcome set development and to explore the influence of consensus criteria on the outcome selection.

STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled parallel group trial with 1:1 allocation within the first Delphi round of the Core Outcome Set in the Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis (CONSIDER) project. Outcomes were rated on a three-point or nine-point Likert scale. Decisions about which outcomes to retain were determined by commonly used consensus criteria (i.e., (combinations of) proportions with restricted ranges, central tendency within a specific range and decrease in variance).

RESULTS: Fifty-seven participants (group 1=28, group 2=29) rated 58 outcomes. The use of the nine-point scale resulted in almost twice as many outcomes being rated as 'critical' compared to the three-point scale (24 versus 13). Stricter criteria and combining criteria led to less outcomes being identified as 'critical'.

CONCLUSION: The format of rating scales in Delphi studies for core outcome set development and the definition of the consensus criteria influence outcome selection. The use of the nine-point scale might be recommended to inform the consensus process for a subsequent rating or face-to-face meeting. The three-point scale might be preferred when determining final consensus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Delphi-procedure, consensus, core outcome set, criteria, dermatology, incontinence-associated dermatitis
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73423 (URN)10.1016/j.jclinepi.2019.03.011 (DOI)000472124400004 ()30922885 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064259913 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Ghent University Special Research Fund 

Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Van Damme, N., Van Hecke, A., Himpens, A., Verhaeghe, S. & Beeckman, D. (2019). Design and psychometric testing of the attitude towards the prevention of incontinence-associated dermatitis instrument (APrIAD). International Wound Journal, 16(2), 492-502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design and psychometric testing of the attitude towards the prevention of incontinence-associated dermatitis instrument (APrIAD)
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2019 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 492-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the availability of a range of skin care products for the prevention of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), prevalence remains high. Nurses' attitude is an important determinant to take into account in quality improvement projects. This study aimed to design a psychometrically test the attitude towards the prevention of incontinence-associated dermatitis instrument (APrIAD). A prospective psychometric instrument validation study was performed in a convenience sample of 217 Belgian nurses. Construct validity and reliability (internal consistency, stability) were tested. The exploratory factor analysis demonstrated a model consisting of four factors and 14 items: (a) beliefs about the impact of IAD on patients, (b) beliefs about team responsibility to prevent IAD, (c) beliefs about personal responsibility to prevent IAD, and (d) beliefs about the effectiveness of IAD prevention products and procedures. Cronbach's α was 0.72 for factor 1, 0.65 for factor 2, 0.63 for factor 3, and 0.47 for factor 4. The intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.689 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.477-0.825) for the total instrument, 0.591 (95% CI 0.388-0.764) for factor 1, 0.387 (95% CI 0.080-0.626) for factor 2, 0.640 (95% CI 0.406-0.795) for factor 3, and 0.768 (95% CI 0.597-0.872) for factor 4. Psychometric testing of the APrIAD demonstrated adequate validity and reliability measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
Attitude, barrier, implementation, incontinence-associated dermatitis, nursing
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71188 (URN)10.1111/iwj.13062 (DOI)000462632200023 ()30588746 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059090464 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
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