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Beeckman, Dimitri, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3080-8716
Publications (10 of 122) Show all publications
Ahmed, A., Koza, E., Shi, V., Ma, M., Haq, M., Kottner, J., . . . Alam, M. (2024). Clinical relevance and uptake of core outcome sets in dermatology [Letter to the editor]. Archives of Dermatological Research, 316(2), Article ID 78.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical relevance and uptake of core outcome sets in dermatology
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2024 (English)In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 316, no 2, article id 78Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111030 (URN)10.1007/s00403-023-02814-z (DOI)001145956400002 ()38244063 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182823541 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-30 Created: 2024-01-30 Last updated: 2024-02-02Bibliographically approved
Fourie, A., Ahtiala, M., Black, J., Campos, H. H., Coyer, F., Gefen, A., . . . Beeckman, D. (2024). Enhancing prone positioning and skin damage prevention education: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing a digital education hub (PRONEtect) and a traditional lecture on final-year nursing participants' confidence and knowledge. Journal of tissue viability, Article ID S0965-206X(24)00022-6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing prone positioning and skin damage prevention education: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing a digital education hub (PRONEtect) and a traditional lecture on final-year nursing participants' confidence and knowledge
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2024 (English)In: Journal of tissue viability, ISSN 0965-206X, article id S0965-206X(24)00022-6Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The incidence of pressure ulcers remains high in patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilated in the prone position. A digital platform, dedicated to prone positioning and skin/tissue damage education was developed.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the PRONEtect Education Hub versus a traditional lecture on final-year nursing students' confidence levels and knowledge in a non-inferiority study.

DESIGN: A multicenter, non-blinded, parallel-group, non-inferiority study with equal randomization (1:1 allocation) was conducted at two nursing schools in Belgium. CLINICALTRIALS: gov (NCT05575869).

METHODS: Following baseline assessments, the control group received a 1-h classroom lecture, and the experimental group gained access to the PRONEtect website. Three weeks later, participants completed the knowledge, confidence, and visual knowledge assessment.

RESULTS: At baseline, 67 of the 80 participants completed the assessments and post-intervention, 28 and 27 participants respectively completed the confidence, knowledge, and visual knowledge assessments (dropout rate of 66.25%). Confidence levels: a mean ratio of relative change from baseline = 0.96 (Control (C)/Experimental (E)); 97.5% confidence interval (CI): 0.74 to 1.26; p = 0.74. Knowledge assessment: a mean difference in change from baseline = 1.58 (C-E); 97.5% CI: -0.58 to 3.75; p = 0.1. Although confidence and knowledge scores increased in both groups, the study cannot conclude non-inferiority.

CONCLUSIONS: The trade-off between the inability to conclude efficacy of the impact of the website and the benefit of having an accessible educational platform on prone positioning and skin damage prevention makes the PRONEtect Education Hub an acceptable adjunct to traditional lecturing.

Keywords
Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Continuing education, Critical care, Nurse clinician, Pressure ulcer, Prone position
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111949 (URN)10.1016/j.jtv.2024.02.008 (DOI)38402096 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-02-26 Created: 2024-02-26 Last updated: 2024-02-28Bibliographically approved
Gefen, A., Alves, P., Beeckman, D., Cullen, B., Lázaro-Martínez, J. L., Lev-Tov, H., . . . Nygren, E. (2024). Fluid handling by foam wound dressings: From engineering theory to advanced laboratory performance evaluations. International Wound Journal, 21(2), Article ID e14674.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fluid handling by foam wound dressings: From engineering theory to advanced laboratory performance evaluations
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2024 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 21, no 2, article id e14674Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article describes the contemporary bioengineering theory and practice of evaluating the fluid handling performance of foam-based dressings, with focus on the important and clinically relevant engineering structure-function relationships and on advanced laboratory testing methods for pre-clinical quantitative assessments of this common type of wound dressings. The effects of key wound dressing material-related and treatment-related physical factors on the absorbency and overall fluid handling of foam-based dressings are thoroughly and quantitively analysed. Discussions include exudate viscosity and temperature, action of mechanical forces and the dressing microstructure and associated interactions. Based on this comprehensive review, we propose a newly developed testing method, experimental metrics and clinical benchmarks that are clinically relevant and can set the standard for robust fluid handling performance evaluations. The purpose of this evaluative framework is to translate the physical characteristics and performance determinants of a foam dressing into achievable best clinical outcomes. These guiding principles are key to distinguishing desirable properties of a dressing that contribute to optimal performance in clinical settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
absorbency and retention, adhesion of adhesive dressings, leakage and failure of wound care, testing methods and standards, treatment
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111640 (URN)10.1111/iwj.14674 (DOI)001161410400001 ()38353372 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agency:

Mölnlycke Health Care AB

Available from: 2024-02-19 Created: 2024-02-19 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Flæten, Ø. Ø., Stafseth, S. K., Vinje, H., Johansen, E., Sunde, K., Wøien, H., . . . Petosic, A. (2024). Incidence, characteristics, and associated factors of pressure injuries acquired in intensive care units over a 12-month period: a secondary analysis of a quality improvement project. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 81, Article ID 103587.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence, characteristics, and associated factors of pressure injuries acquired in intensive care units over a 12-month period: a secondary analysis of a quality improvement project
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2024 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 81, article id 103587Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To determine the 12-month cumulative incidence, characteristics, and associated factors of pressure injuries acquired in Intensive Care Units.

Setting: Four intensive care units in a Norwegian University Hospital.

Research methodology: A prospective observational cohort study using data from daily skin inspections during a quality improvement project. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Variables associated with the development of intensive care unit-acquired pressure injuries are presented with odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals.

Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence of patients (N = 594) developing intensive care unit-acquired pressure injuries was 29 % (172/594) for all categories and 16 % (95/594) when excluding category I pressure injuries (no skin loss). Cumulative incidence for patients acquiring medical device-related pressure injuries was 15 % (91/594) and 11 % (64/594) for category II or worse. Compression stockings (n = 51) and nasogastric tubes (n = 22) were the most frequent documented medical devices related to pressure injuries. Development of pressure injuries category II or worse was significantly associated with vasoactive drug infusions (OR 11.84, 95 % CI [1.59; 88.13]) and longer intensive care unit length of stay (OR 1.06, 95 % CI [1.04; 1.08]).

Conclusion: The 12-month cumulative incidence of intensive care unit-acquired pressure injuries was relatively high when category I pressure injuries were included, but comparable to other studies when category I was excluded. Some medical device-related pressure injuries were surprisingly frequent, and these may be prevented. However, associated factors of developing pressure injuries were present and deemed non-modifiable.

Implications for clinical practice: Awareness about pressure injury prevention is needed in the intensive care unit considering high incidences. Nurses can detect category I pressure injuries early, which may be reversed. Our findings show several factors that clinicians can control to reduce the risk of pressure injuries in the intensive care unit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Critical care nursing, Equipment and supplies, Incidence, Intensive Care Units, Pressure injury, Pressure ulcer
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109965 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2023.103587 (DOI)001131642800001 ()38029679 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85179413474 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Beeckman, D., Cooper, M., Greenstein, E., Idensohn, P., Klein, R. J., Kolbig, N., . . . White, W. (2024). The role community-based healthcare providers play in managing hard-to-heal wounds. International Wound Journal, 21(1), Article ID e14402.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role community-based healthcare providers play in managing hard-to-heal wounds
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2024 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id e14402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is common for community-based healthcare providers (CHPs)-many of whom have not received specialised training in wound care-to deliver initial and ongoing management for various wound types and diverse populations. Wounds in any setting can rapidly transition to a stalled, hard-to-heal wound (HTHW) that is not following a normal healing trajectory. Failure to recognise or address issues that cause delayed healing can lead to increased costs, healthcare utilisation and suffering. To encourage early intervention by CHPs, a panel of wound care experts developed actionable evidence-based recommendations for CHPs delineating characteristics and appropriate care in identifying and treating HTHWs. A HTHW is a wound that fails to progress towards healing with standard therapy in an orderly and timely manner and should be referred to a qualified wound care provider (QWCP) for advanced assessment and diagnosis if not healed or reduced in size by 40%-50% within 4 weeks. HTHWs occur in patients with multiple comorbidities, and display increases in exudate, infection, devitalised tissue, maceration or pain, or no change in wound size. CHPs can play an important initial role by seeing the individual's HTHW risk, addressing local infection and providing an optimal wound environment. An easy-to-follow one-page table was developed for the CHP to systematically identify, evaluate and treat HTHWs, incorporating a basic toolkit with items easily obtainable in common office/clinic practice settings. A flow chart using visual HTHW clinical cues is also presented to address CHPs with different learning styles. These tools encourage delivery of appropriate early interventions that can improve overall healthcare efficiency and cost.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2024
Keywords
Chronic wound, community healthcare provider, hard-to-heal wound, wound dressing, wound healing
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108318 (URN)10.1111/iwj.14402 (DOI)001067500600001 ()37715348 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171357296 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-18 Created: 2023-09-18 Last updated: 2024-01-29Bibliographically approved
Dabas, M., Schwartz, D., Beeckman, D. & Gefen, A. (2023). Application of artificial intelligence methodologies to chronic wound care and management: A scoping review. Advances in wound care, 12(4), 205-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of artificial intelligence methodologies to chronic wound care and management: A scoping review
2023 (English)In: Advances in wound care, ISSN 2162-1918, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 205-240Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

SIGNIFICANCE: As the number of hard-to-heal wound cases rises with the aging of the population and the spread of chronic diseases, healthcare professionals struggle to provide safe and effective care to all their patients simultaneously. This study aimed to provide an in-depth overview of the relevant methodologies of artificial intelligence (AI) and their potential implementation to support these growing needs of wound care and management.

RECENT ADVANCES: MEDLINE, Compendex, Scopus, Web of Science and IEEE databases, were all searched for new AI methods or novel uses of existing AI methods for diagnosis or management of hard-to-heal wounds. We only included English peer-reviewed original articles, conference proceedings, published patent applications or granted patents (not older than 2010) where the performance of the utilized AI algorithms was reported. Based on these criteria, a total of 75 studies were eligible for inclusion. These varied by the type of the utilized AI methodology, the wound type, the medical record/database configuration and the research goal.

CRITICAL ISSUES: AI methodologies appear to have a strong positive impact and prospect in the wound care and management arena. Another important development that emerged from the findings is AI-based remote consultation systems utilizing smartphones and tablets for data collection and connectivity.

FUTURE DIRECTIONS: The implementation of machine learning algorithms in the diagnosis and management of hard-to-heal wounds is a promising approach for improving the wound care delivered to hospitalized patients, while allowing healthcare professionals to manage their working time more efficiently.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2023
Keywords
bioengineering, machine learning, deep learning, convolutional neural networks, chronic wounds
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-98658 (URN)10.1089/wound.2021.0144 (DOI)000815149500001 ()35438547 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147045115 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

Israeli Ministry of Science Technology 3-17421

Available from: 2022-04-21 Created: 2022-04-21 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Desmet, K., Bracke, P., Deproost, E., Goossens, P. J., Vandewalle, J., Vercruysse, L., . . . Verhaeghe, S. (2023). Associated factors of nurse-sensitive patient outcomes: A multicentred cross-sectional study in psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 30(6), 1231-1244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associated factors of nurse-sensitive patient outcomes: A multicentred cross-sectional study in psychiatric inpatient hospitals
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1231-1244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction The lack of evidence on patient characteristics and relational-contextual factors influencing nurse-sensitive patient outcomes of a nurse-patient relationship is a possible threat to the quality and education of the nurse-patient relationship.

Aim To measure nurse-sensitive patient outcomes of the nurse-patient relationship and to explore the associations between nurse-sensitive patient outcomes and a range of patient characteristics and relational-contextual factors.

Method In a multicenter cross-sectional study, 340 inpatients from 30 units in five psychiatric hospitals completed the Mental Health Nurse-Sensitive Patient Outcome Scale. Descriptive, univariate and Linear Mixed Model analyses were conducted.

Results Overall, patient-reported outcomes were moderate to good. Female participants, nurse availability when needed, more nurse contact and nurse stimulation were associated with higher outcomes. Age differences were observed for some of the outcomes. Outcomes also varied across hospitals but were not related to the number of times patients were hospitalized or to their current length of stay in the hospital.

Discussion The results may help nurses to become more sensitive and responsive to factors associated with nurse-sensitive patient outcomes of the nurse-patient relationship.

Implications The nurse-sensitive results can support nurses in designing future nurse-patient relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2023
Keywords
cross-sectional studies, mental health recovery, patient outcome assessment, psychiatric nursing, surveys and questionnaires
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-107030 (URN)10.1111/jpm.12951 (DOI)001024116400001 ()37409521 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85164534543 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-07 Created: 2023-07-07 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Santamaria, N., Woo, K., Beeckman, D., Alves, P., Cullen, B., Gefen, A., . . . Swanson, T. (2023). Clinical performance characteristics for bordered foam dressings in the treatment of complex wounds: An international wound dressing technology expert panel review. International Wound Journal, 20(9), 3467-3473
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical performance characteristics for bordered foam dressings in the treatment of complex wounds: An international wound dressing technology expert panel review
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2023 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 3467-3473Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to identify and describe clinical practice performance characteristics for bordered foam dressings in the treatment of complex wounds. Our recently published systematic review of outcomes and applied measurement instruments for the use of bordered foam dressings in complex wounds has led to us identifying a range of important clinical and patient-centred issues related to this dressing class. Specifically, here, we focus on an overview of performance criteria in the areas of application, adhesion, exudate management and debridement functions of bordered foam dressings. Our hope is that by highlighting the clinical performance criteria, future testing standards for wound dressings will more closely match our clinical expectations and, thereby, assist clinicians to make better wound treatment choices based on meaningful and clinically relevant dressing product performance standards. complex wounds, complex wound care, treatment, bordered foam dressings, dressing performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
bordered foam dressings, complex wounds, dressing performance, treatment
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105871 (URN)10.1111/iwj.14217 (DOI)000980943600001 ()37139846 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85157990699 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

International Wound Dressing Technology Expert Panel (IWDTEP)

Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Sezgin, D., Geraghty, J., Graham, T., Blomberg, K., Charnley, K., Dobbs, S., . . . Gethin, G. (2023). Defining palliative wound care: A scoping review by European Association for Palliative Care wound care taskforce. Journal of tissue viability, 32(4), 627-634
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defining palliative wound care: A scoping review by European Association for Palliative Care wound care taskforce
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2023 (English)In: Journal of tissue viability, ISSN 0965-206X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 627-634Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Deciding whether to transition to wound palliation is challenging for health care professionals because there is no agreed definition or understanding of palliative wound care, including the goals, core elements and differences from general wound management.

OBJECTIVES: To conduct a scoping review with qualitative synthesis to define palliative wound care in terms of its conceptual framework, goals, principles, components, and differences from general wound management, and provide a new definition of palliative wound care based on this scoping review.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Published literature that refers to the definitions, concept, goals and core elements of palliative wound care using any methodological approach, without any time limits, published in English.

SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: The searches were conducted in CINAHL Complete via Ebsco, Medline via Ovid, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar.

CHARTING METHODS: A data extraction form was developed by the review team and used independently for data charting purposes. Braun and Clarke's six phases of thematic analysis guided the qualitative synthesis.

RESULTS: A total of 133 publications met the inclusion criteria. Three main themes were developed to define palliative wound care and understand its differences from general wound management: 1- Healing potential of wounds and patient vulnerability, 2- Understanding the impact on individuals and family to address needs, 3- Towards new goals and perspectives in approach to care.

CONCLUSIONS: Palliative wound care focuses on symptom management, comfort, and dignity, but does not always target the healing of the wound, which is the goal of general wound care. The needs of the individual and their family must be addressed by clinicians through the provision of care and support that takes into account the true meaning of living and dying with a palliative wound.

PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: A review protocol was developed but not registered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Concept, Definition, End of life wound care, Goal, Non-healing, Palliation, Palliative wound care, Principle, Terminal wound care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-107460 (URN)10.1016/j.jtv.2023.07.002 (DOI)001132790600001 ()37482507 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165657914 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-09 Created: 2023-08-09 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved
Fourie, A., Ahtiala, M., Black, J., Campos, H. H., Coyer, F., Gefen, A., . . . Beeckman, D. (2023). Development of prone positioning and skin damage prevention digital education: the PRONEtect project. Journal of Wound Care, 32(9), 570-578
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of prone positioning and skin damage prevention digital education: the PRONEtect project
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Wound Care, ISSN 0969-0700, E-ISSN 2052-2916, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 570-578Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The incidence of skin/tissue damage, such as pressure ulcers, remains high in mechanically ventilated patients in the prone position. According to guidelines, critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) should be prone for at least 12-16 hours to improve oxygenation and decrease mortality. Therefore, educating clinicians on how to reposition and manage the patient safely in a prone position plays a vital role in preventing adverse events. This project aimed to develop accessible online educational content to assist clinicians in safely executing the prone manoeuvre and minimise skin/tissue damage.

METHOD: The development of the educational content was based on: a gap analysis and comprehensive review of available educational resources; evidence-based scientific literature; advice from international experts; and a qualitative study exploring the learning needs of 20 clinicians in Belgium and Sweden between February-August 2022.

RESULTS: Volunteer clinicians assisted with the creation of eight simulation videos which were professionally filmed and edited. The interactive videos included the supine-to-prone and prone-to-supine manoeuvres, endotracheal and nasogastric tube securement, eye care, stoma care, protecting high-risk areas from pressure damage, and incontinence-associated dermatitis prevention. A prone positioning protocol, a checklist summarising the key aspects of the protocol, and teaching aids (slide deck for didactic lecturing) were developed and validated by a review of the relevant evidence-based literature and the international expert panel. A website was designed to host the content, with free user access, at www.pronetection.com.

CONCLUSION: Education is one strategy towards prevention of complications of prone positioning. Accessible education could assist clinicians unfamiliar with prone positioning or current clinicians requiring refresher training to safely manage patients in this position.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MA Healthcare Ltd., 2023
Keywords
Acute respiratory distress syndrome, education, incontinence-associated dermatitis, medical adhesive-related skin injuries, medical device-related pressure injuries, moisture-associated skin damage, pressure ulcer, prone position, skin tears, wound, wound care, wound dressing, wound healing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108190 (URN)10.12968/jowc.2023.32.9.570 (DOI)001067437800007 ()37682782 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175464325 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3080-8716

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