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Barker-Ruchti, NatalieORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3918-7904
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Publications (10 of 72) Show all publications
Greey, A. & Barker-Ruchti, N. (2019). An auto-ethnographic account of one athlete's journey to reconciling gender diversity through elite boxing: A case of a volleyball athlete who became an elite boxer. In: Natalie Barker-Ruchti (Ed.), Athlete learning in elite sport: A cultural framework (pp. 153-164). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An auto-ethnographic account of one athlete's journey to reconciling gender diversity through elite boxing: A case of a volleyball athlete who became an elite boxer
2019 (English)In: Athlete learning in elite sport: A cultural framework / [ed] Natalie Barker-Ruchti, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge , 2019, p. 153-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2019
Series
Routledge research in sports coaching
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77649 (URN)9781138086418 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-10-29 Created: 2019-10-29 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Barker-Ruchti, N., Schubring, A., Anna, P. & Pettersson, S. (2019). An elite athlete’s storying of injuries and non-qualification for an Olympic Games: A socio-narratological case study. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, 11(5), 687-703
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An elite athlete’s storying of injuries and non-qualification for an Olympic Games: A socio-narratological case study
2019 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 687-703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we present and examine the case of one elite athlete – 28-year old Mark (pseudonym), who during a 10-month lead-up to the 2016 Rio OG qualification deadline, aimed to achieve his NGB/NOC’s qualification standards, but sustained several injuries and was forced to give up his qualification attempt. Adopting a socio-narratological framework, we aim to understand how Mark storied the qualification period; how socio-cultural, organisational, and biographical contexts complicated his qualification and how he handled these complications; and how he made sense of not qualifying. Based on data produced through a longitudinal prospective study that included a background questionnaire, three semi-structured interviews, a weekly web survey, a training observation, and a compilation of competition results, our socio-narratological interpretations evidence that Mark aligned his athletic life to the ‘sport performance investment narrative’, but that this narrative provided limited resources to story poor competitive results and injuries. Instead, as Mark faced unexpected disruptions, he adopted a number of restitution strategies (e.g. alternative training/competition plans; positive thinking; rehabilitation) to re-align to the performance narrative. In so doing, Mark compromised injury recovery to worsen his performance and further injure his body, which eventually stopped his qualification process. After a directionless period and personal suffering, Mark again intended to follow the performance investment narrative. We propose that coaches, support staff and sport organisations recognise the pressurised nature of a qualification phase and provide support strategies to moderate instability and possible non-qualification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Qualification in Olympic sport, socio-narratology, Arthur Frank, performance investment narrative, elite sport restitution narrative
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74352 (URN)10.1080/2159676X.2019.1605405 (DOI)000484464300006 ()2-s2.0-85065311255 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish Research Council for Sport Science  P2017-0026 P2016-0056 P2015-0081

Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Barker-Ruchti, N. (Ed.). (2019). Athlete learning in elite sport: A cultural framework. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Athlete learning in elite sport: A cultural framework
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2019
Series
Routledge research in sports coaching
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77648 (URN)9781138086418 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-10-29 Created: 2019-10-29 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Andersson, R. & Barker-Ruchti, N. (2019). Career paths of Swedish top-level women soccer players. Soccer & Society, 20(6), 857-871
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Career paths of Swedish top-level women soccer players
2019 (English)In: Soccer & Society, ISSN 1466-0970, E-ISSN 1743-9590, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 857-871Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores seven Swedish top-level women’s soccer players’ career development experiences. Data were produced through semi-structured interviews and a biographical mapping grid. The theoretical framework of ‘careership’ was employed to understand the data. The results showed homogenous career paths. Moreover, the data show that the players decided at a young age to pursue a career in soccer; experienced the transition from junior to senior level soccer as difficult because of a lack of physical preparedness; soccer over school commitments. We recommend that soccer stakeholders (e.g. federations, clubs, coaches) give the transition from junior to senior level soccer special attention to prevent intense demands that may cause dropout. We further propose that if athletes should give sport and education equal priority, the Swedish dual career concept of high school education and sport needs further reflection and adjustment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71597 (URN)10.1080/14660970.2018.1431775 (DOI)000481483500007 ()2-s2.0-85041898484 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Kerr, R., Barker-Ruchti, N., Schubring, A., Cervin, G. & Nunomura, M. (2019). Coming of age: Coaches transforming the pixie-style model of coaching in women's artistic gymnastics. Sports Coaching Review, 8(1), 7-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coming of age: Coaches transforming the pixie-style model of coaching in women's artistic gymnastics
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2019 (English)In: Sports Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coaches and coach educators have recognised the difficulty of creating changes to traditional coaching practice. In this article, we draw on interviews with five successful coaches who, we argue, engaged in actively changing their gymnastics coaching practice through promoting alternative "games of truth" which challenged the authoritarian women's gymnastics coaching model. This alternative truth game included a focus on energy levels (over thinness) and a belief that older gymnasts can learn new skills and be successful, which led to adaptations of their coaching. We demonstrate how coaches' experiences of coaching older gymnasts and their observations of successful gymnasts' older ages and powerful physiques produced critical reflections of their former views, which led to the recognition of alternative truths. This article illustrates the possibility of coaches changing their coaching practices, although we found that coaches were motivated by success rather than athlete empowerment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Foucault, games of truth, age, coaching, gymnastics
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77639 (URN)10.1080/21640629.2017.1391488 (DOI)000461231600003 ()
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2016-0013 P2015-0013
Note

Funding Agencies:

Lincoln University  2013-25

University of Sao Paulo  14/08006-0

Available from: 2019-10-29 Created: 2019-10-29 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Kuhlin, F., Barker-Ruchti, N. & Stewart, C. (2019). Long-term impact of the coach-athlete relationship on development, health, and wellbeing: stories from a figure skater. Sports Coaching Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term impact of the coach-athlete relationship on development, health, and wellbeing: stories from a figure skater
2019 (English)In: Sports Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Coaches have been shown to detriment athletes’ health, well-being and development. Knowledge of this long-term effect and what it means for athletes to live with such stories is under-explored. Using self-narrative, we examine the long-lasting impact of the coach-athlete relationship in the stories of a former figure skater, Fanny. Guided by Arthur Frank’s dialogical analysis, we present creative non-fictional stories to show how Fanny made sense of her figure skating experiences, which were framed by a sport investment narrative and a career-wrecking injury that terminated her dream of becoming a professional figure skater. We suggest that if handled as an act of self-care, storytelling can re-configure the dominant coach-athlete relationship and sport investment narrative and help athletes to understand and reconstruct their stories. Finally, we reflect upon the impact of Fanny’s story on her advisers and consider the pedagogical implications of such narrative work in sport coaching and sport education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Narrative, socio-narratology, figure skating, ice skating, long-term health, auto-ethnography
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74351 (URN)10.1080/21640629.2019.1620016 (DOI)000468703500001 ()
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Schubring, A., Barker-Ruchti, N., Kerr, R., Cervin, G. & Nunomoura, M. (2019). Maintaining a dual career horizon in women’s artistic gymnastics: A case of a gymnast. In: Natalie Barker-Ruchti (Ed.), Athlete learning in elite sport: A cultural framework. Routledge, s. 45-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining a dual career horizon in women’s artistic gymnastics: A case of a gymnast
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2019 (English)In: Athlete learning in elite sport: A cultural framework / [ed] Natalie Barker-Ruchti, Routledge, 2019, Vol. s. 45-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73308 (URN)10.4324/9781315111025 (DOI)9781351617819 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-22 Created: 2019-03-22 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Schubring, A., Barker-Ruchti, N., Post, A. & Pettersson, S. (2019). Researching health behaviour in ‘real time’: Insights from a prospective study on Olympic hopefuls. Methodological Innovations, 12(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching health behaviour in ‘real time’: Insights from a prospective study on Olympic hopefuls
2019 (English)In: Methodological Innovations, ISSN 2059-7991, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we share our experience of navigating qualitative longitudinal research with a ‘hard to recruit’ population. To detail design conception, methodological challenges and insights, we draw on the case of a 1-year-long study on health behaviour in Olympic hopefuls. In order to accompany 12 athletes who aimed to qualify for either an Olympic Games (n = 10) or a World Championship (n = 2), we developed and implemented a career background questionnaire; semi-structured interviews; weekly web surveys; a training observation and a compilation of competition results. Based on the longitudinal research experience, we present project management and project data of the Paths-to-Rio study to discuss the challenges we faced, including gaining access to an elite population, their retention and anonymity. We further outline insights the prospective study gave us on the value of missing data as data and on the benefits participants described in terms of learning through research involvement. We conclude with recommendations for future qualitative longitudinal research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Qualitative longitudinal research, methodological challenges, career, elite sport, weekly web survey
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74353 (URN)10.1177/2059799119840976 (DOI)
Note

Funding agency:

Swedish Research Council for Sport Science (CIF) under Grant (P2015-0081 and P2016-0056)

Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved
Pinheiro, C., Stewart, C., Barker-Ruchti, N., Schubring, A. & Smits, F. (2019). Springboard: An interactive education tool to prevent gender-based violence against girls in gymnastics. In: : . Paper presented at International Congress - CIDESD 2019, Maia, Portugal, February 1-2, 2019 (pp. 218-218). UTAD - Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Springboard: An interactive education tool to prevent gender-based violence against girls in gymnastics
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Gymnastics is a highly gendered sporting environment (Weber & Barker-Ruchti, 2012) with a history of documented violence in all its forms (Mountjoy et al., 2016) against the girl child who represents over 75% 10 million gymnasts in Europe. Girl gymnasts are at high risk of violence and denied basic child rights. There is compelling evidence of the psychological and physical effects of violence on girl gymnasts which include disordered self-image and body dissatisfaction (Neves et al., 2017), self-harming (Ryan, 1995), disordered eating (Stewart, Schiavon, & Bellotto, 2017), stunted growth and puberty, life-long debilitation and death. Tolerance, normalisation and silencing of violent coaching models have been attributed as causes of violence inflicted on girl gymnasts and there is a strong bystander effect amongst adults (Jacobs, Smits, & Knoppers, 2016; Smits, Jacobs, & Knoppers, 2017). The main goals of the project are: To prevent genderbased violence (GBV) in all its forms against girls in gymnastics by creating, implementing, evaluating and sustaining an effective online education tool; to change social norms and behaviour and empower girls in gymnastics to stand up and call out against GBV; to increase bystander intervention and reporting of GBV in gymnastics; to provide any European country with a scalable, effective and sustainable primary intervention tool.  

METHODS: The methodology consists on the creation, implementation, evaluation and sustainability of Springboard, a website with interactive tools to achieve behavioural levers or solutions, for girls in gymnastics (target audience) and bystanders (target group). Education packages will be created and pre-tested. Springboard will also contain a self-audit tool in the form of an interactive digital quiz. Springboard will use a multitrack storytelling approach and will contain a resource of gymnasts’ stories in the form of short films created and produced through a digital storytelling methodology. A mixed method pre-post testing design to evaluate Springboard intervention and measure behaviour outcomes will be adopted. Baseline and end line data will be collected in the form of an interactive survey corresponding to attitudes, social norms and behaviours. Qualitative data on attitudes, social norms and behaviours will also be collected via focus groups.  

EXPECTED RESULTS: Increased knowledge of GBV and reduction of tolerant attitudes towards violence in gymnastics; increased knowledge that violent relationships and practices are wrong and reduction in the social norm that bystanders should not intervene; increased feelings of empowerment to challenge and report violence; increased awareness of reporting pathways and reporting.  

Funding: Project submitted to the REC-AG Action Grants of the European Commission. Call for proposals for action grants under 2018 Rights, Equality and Citizenship Work Programme; Topic: REC-RDAP-GBV-AG-2018; Type of action: REC-AG

References:

  • Jacobs, F., Smits, F., & Knoppers, A. (2016). You don’t realize what you see!: The    institutional context of emotional abuse in elite youth sport. Sport in Society, 20(1), 1–18.
  • Mountjoy, M., Brackenridge, C., Arrington, M., Blauwer, C., Carska-Sheppard, A., Fasting, K., … Budgett, R. (2016). The IOC consensus statement: harassment and abuse (non-accidental violence) in sport. Br J Sports Medicine, 50(17), 1019–1029.
  • Neves, C., Meireles, J., Berbert de Carvalho, P., Schubring, A., Barker-Ruchti, N., & Ferreira, M. E. (2017). Body dissatisfaction in women’s artistic gymnastics: A longitudinal study of psychosocial indicators. Journal of Sports Sciences, 35(17), 1–7.
  • Ryan, J. (1995). Little girls in pretty boxes: The making and breaking of elite gymnasts and figure skaters. New York: Doubleday.
  • Smits, F., Jacobs, F., & Knoppers, A. (2017). Everything revolves around gymnastics: How elite athletes and their parents make sense of practices in women’s gymnastics that challenges a positive pedagogical culture. Sport in Society, 20(1), 66–83.
  • Stewart, C., Schiavon, L. M., & Bellotto, M. L. (2017). Knowledge, nutrition and coaching pedagogy: a perspective from female Brazilian Olympic gymnasts. Sport, Education and Society, 22(4), 511–527. https://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2015.1046428
  • Weber, J., & Barker-Ruchti, N. (2012). Bending, floating, flirting, flying: A critical analysis of 1970s gymnastics photographs. Sociology of Sport, 29(1), 22–41.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UTAD - Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 2019
Series
Journal Motricidade, ISSN 1646-107X, E-ISSN 2182-2972 ; 15: S1
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72024 (URN)
Conference
International Congress - CIDESD 2019, Maia, Portugal, February 1-2, 2019
Available from: 2019-02-02 Created: 2019-02-02 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Myrian, N., Kerr, R., Cervin, G., Schubring, A. & Barker-Ruchti, N. (2019). THE CODE OF POINTS AND THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT IN WOMEN ' S ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS. Science of Gymnastics Journal, 11(1), 5-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>THE CODE OF POINTS AND THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT IN WOMEN ' S ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS
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2019 (English)In: Science of Gymnastics Journal, ISSN 1855-7171, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 5-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The premise of this article is that the rules of Women's Artistic Gymnastics (WAG) as outlined in the Code of Points significantly affect the experiences of older gymnasts in both positive and negative ways. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of gymnasts, coaches, and judges on the WAG rules and the body ideals, age and career length in Brazil. We draw on qualitative interviews with a sample of two coaches and seven gymnasts from the Brazilian national team, and four judges with international experience. Both coaches and gymnasts perceived younger bodies to be more responsive to the actual rules requirements regarding difficulty and training demands. On the other hand, older gymnasts were felt to be advantaged due to being able to perform more artistically and with less mistakes. Results will allow both the FIG and the Brazilian Gymnastics Federation to reflect on the way the demands of the Code of Points affect the experiences of gymnasts. As our article finds both the rules and the established WAG culture affect gymnasts, both needs to be considered in order to keep healthy gymnasts in the sport longer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ljubljana, Republic of Slovenia: University of Ljubljana, 2019
Keywords
women's artistic gymnastics, body ideals, career development, ageing, rules
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72987 (URN)000459385800002 ()
Note

Funding Agency:

Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)

Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3918-7904

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