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Jönsson, Jessica H.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0810-2848
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Ghazanfareeon Karlsson, S. & Jönsson, J. H. (2019). Forced migration, older people and displacement. In: : . Paper presented at IFSW European Conference, Social Protection & Human Dignity, Vienna, Austria, September 8-11, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forced migration, older people and displacement
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article describes the field of literature concerning globally displaced older refugees and outlines the implications for social work as a human rights profession. The study is based on a review of the social work literature and current examples of globally displaced older refugees; the Rohingya older people at the Bangladesh-Myanmar border and older Palestinians at the Israel-Gaza border and in Lebanon.

The authors suggest that social workers as ‘front-line human rights workers’ are uniquely placed to identify needs, take actionable steps to protect, and advocate for the human rights of displaced older refugees. Global social work ethics and principles of human dignity and human rights need to underpin social work practices that engages people and structures to address life challenges and enhance wellbeing among displaced older refugees at war zones, at the borders and in refugee camps. Future research and welfare projects that aim at analysing the political context, which form the living conditions of forcibly displaced older refugees, whilst enhancing the importance of social workers in interprofessional collaborations and social protection in these areas, are discussed.

National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76422 (URN)
Conference
IFSW European Conference, Social Protection & Human Dignity, Vienna, Austria, September 8-11, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-15 Created: 2019-09-15 Last updated: 2019-09-17Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. (2019). Overfishing, social problems, and ecosocial sustainability in Senegalese fishing communities. Journal of Community Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overfishing, social problems, and ecosocial sustainability in Senegalese fishing communities
2019 (English)In: Journal of Community Practice, ISSN 1070-5422, E-ISSN 1543-3706Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study explores living conditions of people in Senegalese fishing communities in relation to environmental change and unregulated fishing by foreign boats, weakening local opportunities and increasing forced migration of youth, creating problems for the future development of local fishery communities. It employs a postcolonial perspective and analyzes data collected through interviews with individuals from Senegalese fishing communities, social workers and relevant documents. The results show local reactions based on alliances between social workers and local community members to overfishing and the need for national and global structural changes. It is argued that EU’s fishing agreements with Senegalese government is one of the reasons behind youths’ forced migration to EU countries and that the betterment of the living conditions of fishery communities in Senegal requires not only already emerging alliances between social workers and local community members, but also national and global structural changes to protect Africa’s fishing communities and local fisheries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Ecosocial work, fishing communities, Senegal, sustainable development, West Africa
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75974 (URN)10.1080/10705422.2019.1660290 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. (2019). Servants of a 'sinking Titanic' or actors of change?: contested identities of social workers in Sweden [Passiva tjänare av ‘ett sjunkande skepp’ eller förändringsaktörer? Ifrågasatta identiteter hos socialarbetare i Sverige]. European Journal of Social Work, 22(2), 212-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Servants of a 'sinking Titanic' or actors of change?: contested identities of social workers in Sweden [Passiva tjänare av ‘ett sjunkande skepp’ eller förändringsaktörer? Ifrågasatta identiteter hos socialarbetare i Sverige]
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 212-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historically, social workers have been an integral part of a well-developed welfare state in Sweden. However, due to the neoliberal changes, which have seen the weakening of the support system for vulnerable groups and individuals, the traditional ‘solidary role’ of social workers has rapidly altered. This has created uncertainty and dilemmas for the identification of many social workers, who still perceive themselves as promoters of ‘welfare of the people’. This article dwells, therefore, on neoliberal transformations and the changing professional identity of practitioners. The study is based on a comprehensive empirical work of interviews with social workers. The results show a growing and widespread unease with new professional roles and functions of social workers as bureaucrats within a neoliberalised organisation of public social work. Some social workers still try to find creative and new ways of working in solidarity, while others, although critical, see adjustment to the new organisational frames as a way to continue their work. It is argued that social workers are not passive actors in the process of neoliberalisation of public social work in Sweden but could actively take different stances and choose their own identifications, in order to maintain the solidary role of social workers.

Abstract [sv]

Historiskt sett har svenska socialarbetare varit en integrerad del av en välutvecklad välfärdsstat. Men på grund av de nyliberala förändringar som har inneburit en försvagning av välfärdsstaten och dess stödsystem för utsatta grupper och individer, har socialarbetares traditionella ‘solidariska roll’ snabbt förändrats. Detta har skapat rollkonflikter och flera dilemman för många socialarbetare som fortfarande uppfattar och identifierar sig som en profession som främjar välfärd och solidaritet. Föreliggande artikel ämnar att undersöka hur de senaste decenniernas nyliberala förändringar har påverkat socialarbetares professionella identitet i Sverige. Studien bygger på ett omfattande empiriskt material bestående av intervjuer med socialarbetare verksamma inom den kommunala sektorn. Studiens resultat visar på en växande och utbredd oro hos socialarbetare för deras nya professionella roller och funktioner som byråkrater i en nyliberaliserad organisation i offentligt socialt arbete snarare än välfärdsagenter. Resultatet visar också att socialarbetarna reagerar på olika sätt mot sina nya nyliberala professionella roller och funktioner. En del försöker hitta kreativa och nya sätt att arbeta i solidaritet, medans andra, kritiska attityder tilltrots, ser en anpassning till nya organisatoriska ramar som ett sätt att fortsätta sitt jobb. Artikelförfattaren menar att socialarbetare inte behöver vara passiva aktörer i nyliberaliseringsprocessen av det offentliga socialt arbetet i Sverige, utan kan vara aktiva aktörer i att motverka nyliberala förändringarna inom professionen och inta solidariska arbetssätt och identiteter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Neoliberalism, professional identity, social work, symbolic violence, Sweden, Nyliberalism, professionell identitet, socialt arbete, symboliskt våld, Sverige
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72299 (URN)10.1080/13691457.2018.1529659 (DOI)000457563500004 ()2-s2.0-85054795714 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Finch, J., Jönsson, J. H., Kamali, M. & McKendrick, D. (2019). Social work and countering violent extremism in Sweden and the UK. European Journal of Social Work
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social work and countering violent extremism in Sweden and the UK
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Social Work in many Western democracies, is now being increasingly tasked with managing the “problems” of terrorism, namely supporting those affected by terrorist attacks, managing returnees affiliated with Terrorist groups in the Middle East, or, as will be discussed here, identifying those at risk from radicalisation and extremism. Both Britain and Sweden have long standing Counter-Terrorism policies, but decent results developments in both countries, have made it a statutory requirement for social workers, to work within particular policies, PREVENT in the UK, and CVE in Sweden, to identify and manage the risk of those deemed to have, or are at risk of ddeveloping veloping radical and extremist views. These new developments, have been with little in the way of critical debate from social workers and social work academics, and, in some cases we are witnessing a passive adjustment of social work practices and research to the policies of securitisation rather than concern for the matters of social cohesion and social justice. This paper seeks to explores the policies in both countries utilising a comparative approach, to consider the similarities in not only policy and practice, but also in the ethical consequences such policies pose for social workers across Europe. This paper has implications therefore, beyond the British and Swedish context in terms of the increasing neo-liberalisation of social work across Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76078 (URN)10.1080/13691457.2019.1657803 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-04 Created: 2019-09-04 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. (2018). A weakening welfare state and the changing professional identities of social workers in Sweden. In: 8th European Conference for Social Work Research: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at 8th European Conference for Social Work Research, Edinburgh, Scotland, April 18-20, 2018 (pp. 170-170). The University of Edinburgh
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A weakening welfare state and the changing professional identities of social workers in Sweden
2018 (English)In: 8th European Conference for Social Work Research: Book of Abstracts, The University of Edinburgh , 2018, p. 170-170Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social workers have historically been an integral part of a well-developed welfare state in Sweden. However, the traditional ‘solidary role’ of social workers has rapidly altered due to the neoliberal changes, which has weakened the social support system. This has created ‘identity crisis’ for many social workers who still perceive themselves as promoters of ‘welfare of the people’. This study explores the neoliberal transformations and the changing professional identity of municipal social workers and their experiences of, and responses to, the neoliberal reorganisation of public social work in Sweden. The following questions have guided the study: How has the recent political, social and organisational transformations influenced the daily work of social workers? How such changes have influenced the relationship and trust between social workers and service users? How such neoliberal transformations have influenced social workers professional identity? How do social workers respond to neoliberal changes in and limitations to their professional activities? The contribution is based on interviews with 15 social workers working in different municipalities in Sweden, during 2016-17. The interviewed social workers were engaged in different areas of public municipal social work, such as in the areas of child and family welfare, homelessness, mental health problems and substance abuse and social work with asylum-seekers. The results have been analysed in the frame of critical social theory. The study shows that meanwhile some social workers are resisting the neoliberal managerialism, which influence their sense of pride in their professional identities by finding new creative and progressive ways of working with people in need, others are uncritically adjusting themselves to evolving forms of neoliberal managerialism. It is concluded that the new neoliberal political and organisational landscape of professional social work in Sweden and the retreat of the welfare state from its traditional duties and, thereby, the reduction of social workers possibilities to work directly with service users, make the struggle for revitalisation of rights-based welfare state and solidary social work more urgent than ever.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The University of Edinburgh, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72286 (URN)978-1-9999205-7-9 (ISBN)
Conference
8th European Conference for Social Work Research, Edinburgh, Scotland, April 18-20, 2018
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. & Flem, A. L. (2018). Field training in the Global South and unequal power relations: On the challenges of encounters. In: FORSA/NOUSA - Nordic Social Work Conference 2018: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at FORSA/NOUSA - Nordic Social Work Conference 2018: Power and Social Work, Helsinki, Finland, November 21-23, 2018 (pp. 41-41).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Field training in the Global South and unequal power relations: On the challenges of encounters
2018 (English)In: FORSA/NOUSA - Nordic Social Work Conference 2018: Book of Abstracts, 2018, p. 41-41Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

International field training offers unique opportunity for social work students to deepen their understandings of dominant social forces and power relations behind the reproduction of inequalities. Field training in the Global South is often influenced by many students’ colonial discourses and ignorance of their ‘whiteness of power’ received through their West-centric education in the Global North. This creates a challenge for social work educators to properly prepare students for field training in Global South. In this study, based on a mixed method approach, web survey, focus groups and document review of field reports, we examine how international field training influence Swedish and Norwegian students’ knowledge and personal and professional development. The study is guided by the questions: ‘What exemplify inequality of power encountered by the students conducting field training in the Global South?’, ‘What prevent and enable students in identifying unequal power relations during international field training?’, ‘How can social work educators ensure that social work students disentangle power dynamics at personal and structural levels? The results of the study show that international field training can both contribute to deepening students’ understanding of power and privileges and also reinforce their a priori ‘Us’ and ‘Them’-based knowledge. This means that social work educators bear a major responsibility for developing critical curriculums including pedagogical practices using critical reflection of how own biases, assumptions and dominant worldviews may affect the ways students perceive differences and power relations in international field trainings in the Global South.

National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72397 (URN)
Conference
FORSA/NOUSA - Nordic Social Work Conference 2018: Power and Social Work, Helsinki, Finland, November 21-23, 2018
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. & Flem, A. L. (2018). International field training in social work education: beyond colonial divides. Social Work Education, 37(7), 895-908
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International field training in social work education: beyond colonial divides
2018 (English)In: Social Work Education, ISSN 0261-5479, E-ISSN 1470-1227, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 895-908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the influence of and need for a critical and global-oriented social work education on students’ learning and developments in the context of international field training. The study uses mixed methods strategy of web survey, focus groups and document review of field reports. Participants in the study are social work students from social work programs in Norway and Sweden who have conducted their international field training in the Global South. The results of the study show that in order to obtain a critical and postcolonial understanding of global inequalities and the role of social work, students need to be truly prepared for international field training by critical and postcolonial knowledge, which will challenge many students’ West-centric perspectives and facilitate them by a self-reflective positioning throughout their field training. The imagination of traveling to and ‘learning about the others’ should be then replaced by a move beyond ‘us-and-them’ divides in line with the ethical principles and values of social work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Field training, postcolonialism, social work education, social work ethics, West-centrism
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72311 (URN)10.1080/02615479.2018.1461823 (DOI)000442731400006 ()2-s2.0-85045839783 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Kamali, M. & Jönsson, J. H. (2018). Kulturkompetens och antirasistiskt socialt arbete. In: Magnus Dahlstedt & Philip Lalander (Ed.), Manifest: för ett socialt arbete i tiden (pp. 279-289). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kulturkompetens och antirasistiskt socialt arbete
2018 (Swedish)In: Manifest: för ett socialt arbete i tiden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt & Philip Lalander, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2018, p. 279-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72315 (URN)9789144125688 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Kamali, M. & Jönsson, J. H. (Eds.). (2018). Neoliberalism, Nordic Welfare States and Social Work: Current and Future Challenges. New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neoliberalism, Nordic Welfare States and Social Work: Current and Future Challenges
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018. p. 272
Series
Routledge Advances in Social Work
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72316 (URN)9781138084308 (ISBN)9781315111834 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. (2018). Sustainable development and the global role of social work: Discontents and new horizons. In: SWSD 2018: Abstract Book. Paper presented at Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development (SWSD 2018), Dublin, Ireland, July 4-7, 2018 (pp. 925-925).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable development and the global role of social work: Discontents and new horizons
2018 (English)In: SWSD 2018: Abstract Book, 2018, p. 925-925Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social work has only recently embraced sustainable development as part of its global engagement for the improvement of the living conditions of people. This calls for greater global cooperation for monitoring sustainable development in which the betterment of people is the main goals of development. It acknowledges the global roots of local problems and the need for global joined action as part of the core ethical statements of social work in order to handle challenges created by globalisation of neoliberalism. This includes even marketisation and standardisation of professional social work as part of ‘taking care of the problems’ created by recent decades’ neoliberal structural and institutional transformations. This paper aims at exploring the role of social work in counteracting the destructive ‘developmental’ consequences of neoliberal globalisation, including the destruction of local communities’ opportunities and people’s living conditions. Following questions are guiding this study: ‘How can social work research and education help to fulfil the goals of sustainable development? How can social work tackle neoliberal obstacles to sustainable development in its daily practices? The study is based on, research reviews, interviews and documents concerning standardised methods and practices in social work. The results show that critical knowledge of neoliberal models of development and educating students of social work about the necessity of a global sustainable development in which the improvement of people’s living condition and the future of the planet lies at the heart of social work practice are vital for a solidary global social work. It is argued that since neoliberal globalisation have been assisted by political decision makings, social work should be highly engaged in global political and protest social movements, which nurture new and solidary horizons promoting a sustainable and better future for everybody.

Keywords
neoliberalism, social work, sustainable development
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72303 (URN)
Conference
Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development (SWSD 2018), Dublin, Ireland, July 4-7, 2018
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0810-2848

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