To Örebro University

oru.seÖrebro University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Chatzipetrou, Panagiota, Assistant ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0311-1502
Biography [swe]

Dr. Panagiota Chatzipetrou is an Assistant Professor at Örebro University in Örebro,Sweden.

She received her BSc degree in Informatics, MSc in “Informatics and Business Administration” and Ph.D. in Informatics from the Department of Informatics,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTh),Greece. Her doctoral dissertation has the title:“Statistical methods in information systems project planning”.In parallel, she holds a master in pedagogy and didactics and she has been educated in special education,learning difficulties and dyslexia.

As a researcher, she mainly focuses on empirical studies under the different perspectives of software development.Her research interests include applications of statistical methods to quality problems in software engineering and especially to requirements engineering and the exploitation of human factor and the different views that ultimately determine the quality of a software product and the product development.Also, she has been working with decision support systems for the development of software-intensive systems,large-scale agile(and global)software development, and behavioral software engineering.

Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Yu, L., Alégroth, E., Chatzipetrou, P. & Gorschek, T. (2023). Automated NFR testing in continuous integration environments: a multi-case study of Nordic companies. Empirical Software Engineering, 28(6), Article ID 144.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automated NFR testing in continuous integration environments: a multi-case study of Nordic companies
2023 (English)In: Empirical Software Engineering, ISSN 1382-3256, E-ISSN 1573-7616, Vol. 28, no 6, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ContextNon-functional requirements (NFRs) (also referred to as system qualities) are essential for developing high-quality software. Notwithstanding its importance, NFR testing remains challenging, especially in terms of automation. Compared to manual verification, automated testing shows the potential to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of quality assurance, especially in the context of Continuous Integration (CI). However, studies on how companies manage automated NFR testing through CI are limited.ObjectiveThis study examines how automated NFR testing can be enabled and supported using CI environments in software development companies.MethodWe performed a multi-case study at four companies by conducting 22 semi-structured interviews with industrial practitioners.ResultsMaintainability, reliability, performance, security and scalability, were found to be evaluated with automated tests in CI environments. Testing practices, quality metrics, and challenges for measuring NFRs were reported.ConclusionsThis study presents an empirically derived model that shows how data produced by CI environments can be used for evaluation and monitoring of implemented NFR quality. Additionally, the manuscript presents explicit metrics, CI components, tools, and challenges that shall be considered while performing NFR testing in practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Non-functional requirements, NFR, Continuous integration, CI, Automated testing, Metrics, Case study
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109684 (URN)10.1007/s10664-023-10356-1 (DOI)001087927600001 ()2-s2.0-85174862814 (Scopus ID)
Note

We acknowledge support from the KKS Foundation through the S.E.R.T. Research Profile Project and the KKS PLEng 2.0 at Blekinge Institute of Technology.

Available from: 2023-11-15 Created: 2023-11-15 Last updated: 2023-11-15Bibliographically approved
Franch, X., Palomares, C., Quer, C., Chatzipetrou, P. & Gorschek, T. (2023). The state-of-practice in requirements specification: an extended interview study at 12 companies. Requirements Engineering, 28(3), 377-409
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The state-of-practice in requirements specification: an extended interview study at 12 companies
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Requirements Engineering, ISSN 0947-3602, E-ISSN 1432-010X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 377-409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Requirements specification is a core activity in the requirements engineering phase of a software development project. Researchers have contributed extensively to the field of requirements specification, but the extent to which their proposals have been adopted in practice remains unclear. We gathered evidence about the state of practice in requirements specification by focussing on the artefacts used in this activity, the application of templates or guidelines, how requirements are structured in the specification document, what tools practitioners use to specify requirements, and what challenges they face. We conducted an interview-based survey study involving 24 practitioners from 12 different Swedish IT companies. We recorded the interviews and analysed these recordings, primarily by using qualitative methods. Natural language constitutes the main specification artefact but is usually accompanied by some other type of instrument. Most requirements specifications use templates or guidelines, although they seldom follow any fixed standard. Requirements are always structured in the document according to the main functionalities of the system or to project areas or system parts. Different types of tools, including MS Office tools, are used, either individually or combined, in the compilation of requirements specifications. We also note that challenges related to the use of natural language (dealing with ambiguity, inconsistency, and incompleteness) are the most frequent challenges that practitioners face in the compilation of requirements specifications. These findings are contextualized in terms of demographic factors related to the individual interviewees, the organization they are affiliated with, and the project they selected to discuss during our interviews. A number of our findings have been previously reported in related studies. These findings show that, in spite of the large number of notations, models and tools proposed from academia for improving requirements specification, practitioners still mainly rely on plain natural language and general-purpose tool support. We expect more empirical studies in this area in order to better understand the reason of this low adoption of research results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Requirements engineering, Requirements specification, Requirements documentation, Natural language requirements, Requirements management tools, Empirical studies, Interviews
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-106006 (URN)10.1007/s00766-023-00399-7 (DOI)000976172000001 ()2-s2.0-85153952780 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

Ministry of Science and Innovation, Spain (MICINN)

Instituto de Salud Carlos III

Spanish Government PID2020-117191RB-I00/AEI/

Available from: 2023-05-22 Created: 2023-05-22 Last updated: 2023-11-16Bibliographically approved
Klotins, E., Unterkalmsteiner, M., Chatzipetrou, P., Gorschek, T., Prikladnicki, R., Tripathi, N. & Pompermaier, L. B. (2021). A progression model of software engineering goals, challenges, and practices in start-ups. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 47(3), 498-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A progression model of software engineering goals, challenges, and practices in start-ups
Show others...
2021 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, ISSN 0098-5589, E-ISSN 1939-3520, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 498-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Software start-ups are emerging as suppliers of innovation and software-intensive products. However, traditional software engineering practices are not evaluated in the context, nor adopted to goals and challenges of start-ups. As a result, there is insufficient support for software engineering in the start-up context.

Objective: We aim to collect data related to engineering goals, challenges, and practices in start-up companies to ascertain trends and patterns characterizing engineering work in start-ups. Such data allows researchers to understand better how goals and challenges are related to practices. This understanding can then inform future studies aimed at designing solutions addressing those goals and challenges. Besides, these trends and patterns can be useful for practitioners to make more informed decisions in their engineering practice.

Method: We use a case survey method to gather first-hand, in-depth experiences from a large sample of software start-ups. We use open coding and cross-case analysis to describe and identify patterns, and corroborate the findings with statistical analysis.

Results: We analyze 84 start-up cases and identify 16 goals, 9 challenges, and 16 engineering practices that are common among startups. We have mapped these goals, challenges, and practices to start-up life-cycle stages (inception, stabilization, growth, and maturity). Thus, creating the progression model guiding software engineering efforts in start-ups.

Conclusions: We conclude that start-ups to a large extent face the same challenges and use the same practices as established companies. However, the primary software engineering challenge in start-ups is to evolve multiple process areas at once, with a little margin for serious errors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2021
Keywords
Software, Software engineering; Companies, Market opportunities, Requirements engineering, Analytical models, Software start-up, software engineering practices, progression model
National Category
Software Engineering Information Systems Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Information technology; Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72484 (URN)10.1109/TSE.2019.2900213 (DOI)000631200300004 ()
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) 

Foundation for Research Support of the State of Rio Grande do Sul (FAPERGS) 17/2551-0001205-4

Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2021-03-31Bibliographically approved
Palomares, C., Franch, X., Quer, C., Chatzipetrou, P., López, L. & Gorschek, T. (2021). The state-of-practice in requirements elicitation: an extended interview study at 12 companies. Requirements Engineering, 26(2), 273-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The state-of-practice in requirements elicitation: an extended interview study at 12 companies
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Requirements Engineering, ISSN 0947-3602, E-ISSN 1432-010X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 273-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Requirements engineering remains a discipline that is faced with a large number of challenges, including the implementation of a requirements elicitation process in industry. Although several proposals have been suggested by researchers and academics, little is known of the practices that are actually followed in industry. Our objective is to investigate the state-of-practice with respect to requirements elicitation, by closely examining practitioners' current practices. To this aim, we focus on the techniques that are used in industry, the roles that requirements elicitation involves, and the challenges that the requirements elicitation process is faced with. As method, we conducted an interview-based survey study involving 24 practitioners from 12 different Swedish IT companies, and we recorded the interviews and analyzed these recordings by using quantitative and qualitative methods. Several results emerged from the studies. Group interaction techniques, including meetings and workshops, are the most popular type of elicitation techniques that are employed by the practitioners, except in the case of small projects. Additionally, practitioners tend to use a variety of elicitation techniques in each project. We noted that customers are frequently involved in the elicitation process, except in the case of market-driven organizations. Technical staff (for example, developers and architects) are more frequently involved in the elicitation process compared to the involvement of business or strategic staff. Finally, we identified a number of challenges with respect to stakeholders. These challenges include difficulties in understanding and prioritizing their needs. Further, it was noted that requirements instability (i.e., caused by changing needs or priorities) was a predominant challenge. These observations need to be interpreted in the context of the study. We conclude that the relevant observations regarding the survey participants' experiences should be of interest to the industry; experiences that should be analyzed in the practitioners' context. Researchers may find evidence for the use of academic results in practice, thereby inspiring future theoretical work, as well as further empirical studies in the same area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Requirements engineering, Requirements elicitation, Empirical studies, Interviews
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-89703 (URN)10.1007/s00766-020-00345-x (DOI)000610480200001 ()2-s2.0-85099768949 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

GENESIS project - Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion TIN2016-79269-R

Horizon 2020 project OpenReq - European Union 732463

Available from: 2021-02-18 Created: 2021-02-18 Last updated: 2021-12-20Bibliographically approved
Klotins, E., Unterkalmsteiner, M., Chatzipetrou, P., Gorschek, T., Prikladnicki, R., Tripathi, N. & Pompermaier, L. B. (2021). Use of Agile Practices in Start-up Companies. e-Informatica Software Engineering Journal, 15(1), 47-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of Agile Practices in Start-up Companies
Show others...
2021 (English)In: e-Informatica Software Engineering Journal, ISSN 1897-7979, E-ISSN 2084-4840, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 47-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Software start-ups have shown their ability to develop and launch innovative software products and services. Small, motivated teams and uncertain project scope makes start-ups good candidates for adopting Agile practices.

Objective: We explore how start-ups use Agile practices and what effects can be associated with the use of those practices.

Method: We use a case survey to analyze 84 start-up cases and 56 Agile practices. We apply statistical methods to test for statistically significant associations between the use of Agile practices, team, and product factors.

Results: Our results suggest that development of the backlog, use of version control, code refactoring, and development of user stories are the most frequently reported practices. We identify 22 associations between the use of Agile practices, team, and product factors. The use of Agile practices is associated with effects on source code and overall product quality. A teams' positive or negative attitude towards best engineering practices is a significant indicator for either adoption or rejection of certain Agile practices. To explore the relationships in our findings, we set forth a number of propositions that can be investigated in future research.

Conclusions: We conclude that start-ups use Agile practices, however without following any specific methodology. We identify the opportunity for more fine-grained studies into the adoption and effects of individual Agile practices. Start-up practitioners could benefit from Agile practices in terms of better overall quality, tighter control over team performance, and resource utilization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Technical University of Wroclaw, 2021
Keywords
Agile practices, start-up companies
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-92478 (URN)10.37190/e-Inf210103 (DOI)000657427800001 ()
Note

Funding Agencies:

Software Start-up Research Network4 community  

Foundation for Research Support of the State of Rio Grande do Sul 17/2551-0001/205-4

Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (CNPQ) 

Available from: 2021-06-18 Created: 2021-06-18 Last updated: 2021-06-18Bibliographically approved
Chatzipetrou, P., Papatheocharous, E., Wnuk, K., Borg, M., Alégroth, E. & Gorschek, T. (2020). Component attributes and their importance in decisions and component selection. Software quality journal, 28(2), 567-593
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Component attributes and their importance in decisions and component selection
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Software quality journal, ISSN 0963-9314, E-ISSN 1573-1367, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 567-593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Component-based software engineering is a common approach in the development and evolution of contemporary software systems. Different component sourcing options are available, such as: (1) Software developed internally (in-house), (2) Software developed outsourced, (3) Commercial off-the-shelf software, and (4) Open-Source Software. However, there is little available research on what attributes of a component are the most important ones when selecting new components. The objective of this study is to investigate what matters the most to industry practitioners when they decide to select a component. We conducted a cross-domain anonymous survey with industry practitioners involved in component selection. First, the practitioners selected the most important attributes from a list. Next, they prioritized their selection using the Hundred-Dollar ($100) test. We analyzed the results using compositional data analysis. The results of this exploratory analysis showed that cost was clearly considered to be the most important attribute for component selection. Other important attributes for the practitioners were: support of the componentlongevity prediction, and level of off-the-shelf fit to product. Moreover, several practitioners still consider in-house software development to be the sole option when adding or replacing a component. On the other hand, there is a trend to complement it with other component sourcing options and, apart from cost, different attributes factor into their decision. Furthermore, in our analysis, nonparametric tests and biplots were used to further investigate the practitioners’ inherent characteristics. It seems that smaller and larger organizations have different views on what attributes are the most important, and the most surprising finding is their contrasting views on the cost attribute: larger organizations with mature products are considerably more cost aware.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Component-based software engineering, Component sourcing options, Decision making, Compositional data analysis, Cumulative voting
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76412 (URN)10.1007/s11219-019-09465-2 (DOI)000538379800008 ()2-s2.0-85073954446 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-09-13 Created: 2019-09-13 Last updated: 2020-08-12Bibliographically approved
Smite, D., Moe, N. B., Floryan, M., Levinta, G. & Chatzipetrou, P. (2020). Spotify guilds. Communications of the ACM, 63(3), 58-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spotify guilds
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 58-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the increasing popularity of agile development and team-oriented practices, bottom-up coordination structures have found their ways into software companies, first changing the small companies and now revolutionizing large-scale development projects and programs. One of the ways to enable bottom-up coordination is cultivation of communities of practice. Existing research has demonstrated that successful implementation of communities of practice depends on organizational support, mutual engagement and regular interaction. Engagement is said to increase, when a community creates value for the organization and individual community members, while increased engagement is further associated with the ability to create more value. However, little is known about how to ensure member engagement in large-scale environments covering many sites and thousands of developers. In this article, we report our findings from studying member engagement in large-scale distributed communities of practice at Spotify called guilds. We report the perceived value guilds provide on individual and organizational level, and discuss what hinders and what stimulates mutual engagement and value creation across time and space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020
Keywords
Communities of practice, guilds, global software development, large-scale, agile, empirical
National Category
Information Systems Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80774 (URN)10.1145/3343146 (DOI)000582584200021 ()2-s2.0-85080863519 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-25 Created: 2020-03-25 Last updated: 2020-11-23Bibliographically approved
Petersson, J., Hatakka, M. & Chatzipetrou, P. (2020). Students Perception on Group Workshops – A Comparison Between Campus-Based and Online Workshops. In: Carsten Busch, Martin Steinicke and Tilo Wendler (Ed.), Proceedings of the 19th European Conference on e-Learning ECEL 2020: . Paper presented at 19th European Conference on e-Learning (ECEL 2020 - A Virtual Conference), Berlin, Germany, October 28-30, 2020 (pp. 397-405). ACI Academic Conferences International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students Perception on Group Workshops – A Comparison Between Campus-Based and Online Workshops
2020 (English)In: Proceedings of the 19th European Conference on e-Learning ECEL 2020 / [ed] Carsten Busch, Martin Steinicke and Tilo Wendler, ACI Academic Conferences International, 2020, p. 397-405Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present the results of a comparison on students’ perception of group workshops that traditionally have been conducted on campus, but due to the covid-19 pandemic had to be conducted online. The workshops studied in this paper are learning activities where students in groups of 4-5 collaborate to solve programming problems without the help of computers. The course context is an introductory programming course at the information systems department in a Swedish university. Under “normal” campus-based circumstances, course evaluations have shown these workshops to be the most appreciated and engaging elements in a flipped pedagogy, active learning-based course. The aim of the study is to investigate if student perception of the workshops and their outcome differs when the activity no longer is conducted on campus and face-to-face. A survey targeting different aspects of student perception of the workshops was conducted before and after the change from campus to online. The analysis shows that there is a statistically significant difference in regards to the student’s ability to achieve the course goals and the outcome of the workshops. However, there does not appear to be any difference in the student’s perception to get help and feedback from the teachers. Overall, the results show that the students are less pleased with the workshops and with their performance in the online workshops compared to when they are campus-based.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACI Academic Conferences International, 2020
Keywords
online workshops, group workshops, covid-19, emergency remote teaching, introductory programming
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-86757 (URN)978-1-912764-79-2 (ISBN)978-1-912764-78-5 (ISBN)
Conference
19th European Conference on e-Learning (ECEL 2020 - A Virtual Conference), Berlin, Germany, October 28-30, 2020
Available from: 2020-10-23 Created: 2020-10-23 Last updated: 2022-02-08Bibliographically approved
Smite, D., van Solingen, R. & Chatzipetrou, P. (2020). The Offshoring Elephant in the Room: Turnover. IEEE Software, 37(3), 54-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Offshoring Elephant in the Room: Turnover
2020 (English)In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 54-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Staffing software projects with engineers from inexpensive locations has become commonplace. However, distributed development remains practically challenging because of recurring problems, e.g., decreased productivity, low quality, and high, unforeseen costs. Although it is often overlooked, one of the main underlying reasons for these challenges is high employee turnover. This might be especially noticeable in developing countries with strong economic growth such as India. This article examines turnover of Indian software engineers and introduces strategies to address it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2020
Keywords
Project management, Software development management, Productivity, Collaboration, Economics, Employment, Personnel, Offshoring, Global software engineering, Global software development, Turnover, Attrition, Hidden costs
National Category
Information Systems Software Engineering
Research subject
Information technology; Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72483 (URN)10.1109/MS.2018.2886179 (DOI)000528835000008 ()2-s2.0-85062971088 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2020-05-18Bibliographically approved
Yu, L., Alégroth, E., Chatzipetrou, P. & Gorschek, T. (2020). Utilising CI environment for efficient and effective testing of NFRs. Information and Software Technology, 117, Article ID 106199.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utilising CI environment for efficient and effective testing of NFRs
2020 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 117, article id 106199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context

Continuous integration (CI) is a practice that aims to continuously verify quality aspects of a software intensive system both for functional and non-functional requirements (NFRs). Functional requirements are the inputs of development and can be tested in isolation, utilising either manual or automated tests. In contrast, some NFRs are difficult to test without functionality, for NFRs are often aspects of functionality and express quality aspects. Lacking this testability attribute makes NFR testing complicated and, therefore, underrepresented in industrial practice. However, the emergence of CI has radically affected software development and created new avenues for software quality evaluation and quality information acquisition. Research has, consequently, been devoted to the utilisation of this additional information for more efficient and effective NFR verification.

Objective

We aim to identify the state-of-the-art of utilising the CI environment for NFR testing, hereinafter referred to as CI-NFR testing.

Method

Through rigorous selection, from an initial set of 747 papers, we identified 47 papers that describe how NFRs are tested in a CI environment. Evidence-based analysis, through coding, is performed on the identified papers in this SLR.

Results

Firstly, ten CI approaches are described by the papers selected, each describing different tools and nine different NFRs where reported to be tested. Secondly, although possible, CI-NFR testing is associated with eight challenges that adversely affect its adoption. Thirdly, the identified CI-NFR testing processes are tool-driven, but there is a lack of NFR testing tools that can be used in the CI environment. Finally, we proposed a CI framework for NFRs testing.

Conclusion

A synthesised CI framework is proposed for testing various NFRs, and associated CI tools are also mapped. This contribution is valuable as results of the study also show that CI-NFR testing can help improve the quality of NFR testing in practices.

Keywords
Agile, Continuous integration, CI, DevOps, Non-functional requirement, NFR, Scaled agile framework, SAFe
National Category
Information Systems Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79434 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2019.106199 (DOI)000496874400005 ()2-s2.0-85073572821 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

We would like to acknowledge that this work was supported by the KKS foundation through the S.E.R.T. Research Profile project at Blekinge Institute of Technology.

Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0311-1502

Search in DiVA

Show all publications