To Örebro University

oru.seÖrebro University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Sigmundsson, Freyr GautiORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7376-4664
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Szigethy, L., Sigmundsson, F. G. & Joelson, A. (2024). Surgically Treated Degenerative Lumbar Spine Diseases in Twins. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surgically Treated Degenerative Lumbar Spine Diseases in Twins
2024 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume, ISSN 0021-9355, E-ISSN 1535-1386Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence to suggest a potential genetic component underlying the development and progression of lumbar spine diseases. However, the heritability and the concordance rates for the phenotypes requiring surgery for the common spine diseases lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and lumbar disc herniation (LDH) are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the heritability and the concordance rates for LSS and LDH requiring surgery by studying monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs.

METHODS: Patients between 18 and 85 years of age who underwent surgery for LSS or LDH between 1996 and 2022 were identified in the national Swedish spine registry (LSS: 45,110 patients; LDH: 39,272 patients), and matched with the Swedish Twin Registry to identify MZ and DZ twins. Pairwise and probandwise concordance rates, heritability estimates, and MZ/DZ concordance ratios were calculated.

RESULTS: We identified 414 twin pairs (92 MZ and 322 DZ pairs) of whom 1 or both twins underwent surgery for LSS. The corresponding number for LDH was 387 twin pairs (118 MZ and 269 DZ pairs). The probandwise concordance rate for LSS requiring surgery was 0.25 (26 of 105) (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14 to 0.34) for MZ twins and 0.04 (12 of 328) (95% CI, 0.01 to 0.07) for DZ twins. The corresponding values for LDH requiring surgery were 0.03 (4 of 120) (95% CI, 0 to 0.08) and 0.01 (4 of 271) (95% CI, 0 to 0.04), respectively. The probandwise MZ/DZ concordance ratio was 6.8 (95% CI, 2.9 to 21.5) for LSS and 2.3 (95% CI, 0 to 8.9) for LDH. The heritability was significantly higher in LSS compared with LDH (0.64 [95% CI, 0.50 to 0.74] versus 0.19 [95% CI, 0.08 to 0.35]).

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that genetic factors may play an important role in the risk of developing LSS requiring surgery, whereas heredity seems to be of less importance in LDH requiring surgery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2024
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111852 (URN)10.2106/JBJS.23.00902 (DOI)38386722 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-02-23 Created: 2024-02-23 Last updated: 2024-02-23Bibliographically approved
Joelson, A., Szigethy, L., Wildeman, P., Sigmundsson, F. G. & Karlsson, J. (2023). Associations between future health expectations and patient satisfaction after lumbar spine surgery: a longitudinal observational study of 9929 lumbar spine surgery procedures. BMJ Open, 13(9), Article ID e074072.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between future health expectations and patient satisfaction after lumbar spine surgery: a longitudinal observational study of 9929 lumbar spine surgery procedures
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e074072Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the associations between general health expectations and patient satisfaction with treatment for the two common spine surgery procedures diskectomy for lumbar disk herniation (LDH) and decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). DESIGN: Register study with prospectively collected preoperative and 1-year postoperative data.

SETTING: National outcome data from Swespine, the national Swedish spine register.

PARTICIPANTS: A total of 9929 patients, aged between 20 and 85 years, who were self-reported non-smokers, and were operated between 2007 and 2016 for one-level LSS without degenerative spondylolisthesis, or one-level LDH, were identified in the national Swedish spine register (Swespine). We used SF-36 items 11c and 11d to assess future health expectations and present health perceptions. Satisfaction with treatment was assessed using the Swespine satisfaction item.

INTERVENTIONS: One-level diskectomy for LDH or one-level decompression for LSS.

PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Satisfaction with treatment. RESULTS: For LSS, the year 1 satisfaction ratio among patients with negative future health expectations preoperatively was 60% (95% CI 58% to 63%), while it was 75% (95% CI 73% to 76%) for patients with positive future health expectations preoperatively. The corresponding numbers for LDH were 73% (95% CI 71% to 75%) and 84% (95% CI 83% to 85%), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients operated for the common lumbar spine diseases LSS or LDH, with negative future general health expectations, were significantly less satisfied with treatment than patients with positive expectations with regard to future general health. These findings are important for patients, and for the surgeons who counsel them, when surgery is a treatment option for LSS or LDH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Adult orthopaedics, Quality of Life, Spine
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108559 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2023-074072 (DOI)001077459700021 ()37748852 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85172248880 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-26 Created: 2023-09-26 Last updated: 2024-01-02Bibliographically approved
Nerelius, F., Sigmundsson, F. G., Karlén, N., Wretenberg, P. & Joelson, A. (2023). Patient-reported Outcome after Surgical Evacuation of Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematomas at One-year Follow-up. Spine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient-reported Outcome after Surgical Evacuation of Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematomas at One-year Follow-up
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the National Swedish Spine Register (Swespine).

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of symptomatic spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) requiring reoperation on one-year patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in a large cohort of patients treated surgically for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS).

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Studies exploring the outcomes of reoperations after SSEH are scarce and often lack validated outcome measures. As SSEH is considered a serious complication, understanding of the outcome following hematoma evacuation is important.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: After retrieving data from 2007 to 2017 from Swespine, we included all patients with LSS without concomitant spondylolisthesis who were treated surgically with decompression without fusion. Patients with evacuated SSEH were identified in the registry. Back/leg pain numerical rating scales (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and EQ VAS were used for outcome assessment. PROMs before and one-year after decompression surgery were compared between evacuated patients and all other patients. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine if hematoma evacuation predicted inferior one-year PROM scores.

RESULTS: A total of 113 patients with an evacuated SSEH were compared with 19527 patients with no evacuation. One-year after decompression surgery, both groups showed significant improvement in all PROMs. When comparing the two groups' one-year improvement there were no significant differences in any PROM. The proportion of patients achieving the minimum important change was not significantly different for any PROM. Multivariate linear regression found that hematoma evacuation significantly predicted inferior one-year ODI (β=4.35, P=0.043), but it was not a significant predictor of inferior NRS Back (β=0.50, P=0.105), NRS Leg (β=0.41, P=0.221), or EQ VAS (β=-1.97, P=0.470). CONCLUSIONS: A surgically evacuated SSEH does not affect outcome in terms of back/leg pain or health-related quality of life. Commonly used PROM surveys may not capture neurologic deficits associated with SSEH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2023
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-106100 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000004720 (DOI)37235784 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-05-29 Created: 2023-05-29 Last updated: 2023-05-29Bibliographically approved
Elmose, S. F., Andersen, G. O., Carreon, L. Y., Sigmundsson, F. G. & Andersen, M. O. (2023). Radiological Definitions of Sagittal Plane Segmental Instability in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine - A Systematic Review. Global Spine Journal, 13(2), 523-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiological Definitions of Sagittal Plane Segmental Instability in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine - A Systematic Review
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Global Spine Journal, ISSN 2192-5682, E-ISSN 2192-5690, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 523-533Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Design: Systematic Review.

Objective: To collect and group definitions of segmental instability, reported in surgical studies of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and/or lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS). To report the frequencies of these definitions. To report on imaging measurement thresholds for instability in patients and compare these to those reported in biomechanical studies and studies of spine healthy individuals.To report on studies that include a reliability study.

Methods: This review was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies eligible for inclusion were clinical and biomechanical studies on adult patients with LDS and/or LSS who underwent surgical treatment and had data on diagnostic imaging. A systematic literature search was conducted in relevant literature databases. Full text screening inclusion criteria was definition of segmental instability or any synonym. Two reviewers independently screened articles in a two-step process. Data synthesis presented by tabulate form and narrative synthesis.

Results: We included 118 studies for data extraction, 69% were surgical studies with decompression or fusion as interventions, 31% non-interventional studies. Grouping the definitions of segmental instability according similarities showed that 24% defined instability by dynamic sagittal translation, 26% dynamic translation and dynamic angulation, 8% used a narrative definition. Comparison showed that non-interventional studies with a healthy population more often had a narrative definition.

Conclusion: Despite a reputation of non-consensus, segmental instability in the degenerative lumbar spine can radiologically be defined as > 3 mm dynamic sagittal translation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
systematic review, lumbar segmental instability, lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, diagnostic imaging, clinical spine surgery
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-99445 (URN)10.1177/21925682221099854 (DOI)000800548900001 ()35606897 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85130994896 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-10 Created: 2022-06-10 Last updated: 2023-03-15Bibliographically approved
Elmose, S. F., Andersen, M. O., Sigmundsson, F. G. & Carreon, L. Y. (2023). Response to "letter to the Editor Regarding: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Proxies for Segmental Instability in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Patients" [Letter to the editor]. Spine, 48(13), E221-E221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response to "letter to the Editor Regarding: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Proxies for Segmental Instability in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Patients"
2023 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 48, no 13, p. E221-E221Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2023
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-107220 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000004635 (DOI)001006696600006 ()2-s2.0-85162894191 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-31 Created: 2023-07-31 Last updated: 2023-07-31Bibliographically approved
Joelson, A. & Sigmundsson, F. G. (2022). Additional operation rates after surgery for degenerative spine diseases: minimum 10 years follow-up of 4705 patients in the national Swedish spine register. BMJ Open, 12(12), Article ID e067571.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Additional operation rates after surgery for degenerative spine diseases: minimum 10 years follow-up of 4705 patients in the national Swedish spine register
2022 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e067571Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To identify rates of additional operation after the index operation for degenerative lumbar spine diseases.Design Retrospective register study.Setting National outcome data from Swespine, the National Swedish spine register.

Participants: A total of 4705 patients who underwent one-level surgery for degenerative disk disease (DDD) or lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) with or without degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010 were followed from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2020 to record all cases of additional lumbar spine operations.Interventions One-level spinal decompression and/or posterolateral fusion for degenerative spine diseases.

Primary outcome measures: Number of additional operations.

Results: Additional operations were more common at adjacent levels for patients with LSS with DS treated with decompression and fusion whereas additional operations were more evenly distributed between the index level and the adjacent levels for DDD treated with fusion and LSS with and without DS treated with decompression only. For patients younger than 60 years, treated with decompression and fusion for LSS with DS, the additional operations were evenly distributed between the index level and the adjacent levels.

Conclusions: There are different patterns of additional operations following the index procedure after surgery for degenerative spine diseases. Rigidity across previously mobile segments is not the only important factor in the development of adjacent segment disease (ASD) after spinal fusion, also the underlying disease and age may play parts in ASD development. The findings of this study can be used in the shared decision-making process when surgery is a treatment option for patients with degenerative lumbar spine diseases as the first operation may be the start of a series of additional spinal operations for other degenerative spinal conditions, either at the index level or at other spinal levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2022
Keywords
Spine, Back pain, Adult orthopaedics
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102636 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-067571 (DOI)000901531900022 ()36600338 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144516132 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-09 Created: 2022-12-09 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Sigmundsson, F. G., Joelson, A. & Strömqvist, F. (2022). Additional operations after surgery for lumbar disc prolapse: indications, type of surgery, and long-term follow-up of primary operations performed from 2007 to 2008. The Bone & Joint Journal, 104-B(5), 627-632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Additional operations after surgery for lumbar disc prolapse: indications, type of surgery, and long-term follow-up of primary operations performed from 2007 to 2008
2022 (English)In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 104-B, no 5, p. 627-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: Lumbar disc prolapse is a frequent indication for surgery. The few available long-term follow-up studies focus mainly on repeated surgery for recurrent disease. The aim of this study was to analyze all reasons for additional surgery for patients operated on for a primary lumbar disc prolapse.

METHODS: We retrieved data from the Swedish spine register about 3,291 patients who underwent primary surgery for a lumbar disc prolapse between January 2007 and December 2008. These patients were followed until December 2020 to record all additional lumbar spine operations and the reason for them.

RESULTS: In total, 681 of the 3,291 patients (21%) needed one or more additional operations. More than three additional operations was uncommon (2%; 15/906). Overall, 906 additional operations were identified during the time period, with a mean time to the first of these of 3.7 years (SD 3.6). The most common reason for an additional operation was recurrent disc prolapse (47%; 426/906), followed by spinal stenosis or degenerative spondylolisthesis (19%; 176/906), and segmental pain (16%; 145/906). The most common surgical procedures were revision discectomy (43%; 385/906) and instrumented fusion (22%; 200/906). Degenerative spinal conditions other than disc prolapse became a more common reason for additional surgery with increasing length of follow-up. Most patients achieved the minimally important change (MIC) for the patient-reported outcomes after the index surgery. After the third additional spinal operation, only 20% (5/25) achieved the MIC in terms of leg pain, and 29% (7/24) in terms of the EuroQol five-dimension index questionnaire visual analogue scale.

CONCLUSION: More than one in five patients operated on for a lumbar disc prolapse underwent further surgery during the 13-year follow-up period. Recurrent disc prolapse was the most common reason for additional surgery, followed by spinal stenosis and segmental pain. This study shows that additional operations after primary disc surgery are needed more frequently than previously reported, and that the outcome profoundly deteriorates after the second additional operation. The findings from this study can be used in the shared decision-making process. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2022;104-B(5):627-632.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS), 2022
Keywords
Complications, Degenerative disc disease, Degenerative spine, Lumbar disc herniation, Outcome, Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), Recurrent disc herniation, Reoperation, degenerative spondylolisthesis, discectomy, leg pain, lumbar disc, lumbar spine, primary surgery, spinal stenosis, spine, visual analogue scale (VAS)
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-98850 (URN)10.1302/0301-620X.104B5.BJJ-2021-1706.R2 (DOI)35491575 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-05-04 Created: 2022-05-04 Last updated: 2022-05-04Bibliographically approved
Elmose, S. F., Andersen, M. O., Sigmundsson, F. G. & Carreon, L. Y. (2022). Magnetic Resonance Imaging Proxies for Segmental Instability in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Patients. Spine, 47(21), 1473-1482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Magnetic Resonance Imaging Proxies for Segmental Instability in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Patients
2022 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 47, no 21, p. 1473-1482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study design: Retrospective cohort study.

Objective: The aim was to investigate whether findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be proxies (MRIPs) for segmental instability in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS) L4/L5.

Background: LDS has a heterogeneous nature. Some patients have a dynamic component of segmental instability associated with LDS. Studies have shown that MRI can show signs of instability.

Methods: Patients with LSS or LDS at L4/L5 undergoing decompressive surgery +/- fusion from 2010 to 2017, with preoperative standing lateral spine radiographs and supine lumbar MRI and enrolled in Danish national spine surgical database, DaneSpine. Instability defined as slip of >3 mm on radiographs. Patients divided into two groups based upon presence of instability. Outcome measures: radiograph: sagittal slip (mm). MRIPs for instability: sagittal slip >3 mm, facet joint angle (degrees), facet joint effusion (mm), disk height index (%), and presence of vacuum phenomena. Optimal thresholds for MRIPs was determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the curve (AUC). Logistic regression to investigate association between instability and MRIPs.

Results: Two hundred thirty-two patients: 47 stable group and 185 unstable group. The two groups were comparable with regard to baseline patient-reported outcome measures. Thresholds for MRIPs: bilateral facet joint angle >= 46 degrees; bilateral facet effusion >= 1.5 mm and disk height index >= 13%. Logistic regression showed statistically significant association with MRIPs except vacuum phenomena, ROC curve AUC of 0.951. By absence of slip on MRI logistic regression showed statistically significant association between instability on radiograph and the remaining MRIPs, ROC curve AUC 0.757.

Conclusion: Presence of MRIPs for instability showed statistically significant association with instability and excellent ability to predict instability on standing radiograph in LSS and LDS patients. Even in the absence of slip on MRI the MRIPs had a good ability to discriminate presence of instability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2022
Keywords
lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, magnetic resonance imaging proxies, segmental instability
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-101953 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000004437 (DOI)000865487700003 ()35877558 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139571096 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-27 Created: 2022-10-27 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved
Holy, M., Joelson, A. & Sigmundsson, F. G. (2022). Occult spondylodiscitis after cervical intradiscal injection with radiopaque gelified ethanol, DiscoGel: A case report. Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery, 28, Article ID 101453.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occult spondylodiscitis after cervical intradiscal injection with radiopaque gelified ethanol, DiscoGel: A case report
2022 (English)In: Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery, E-ISSN 2214-7519, Vol. 28, article id 101453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A 25-year-old patient was treated for post-traumatic neck pain with intradiscal injections at the C3-4 and C4-5 levels using radiopaque gelified ethanol. After the injections, the axial neck pain increased. Laboratory infection parameters were normal despite the progressive disc destruction observed on CT scans at both index levels. The patient underwent debridement and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Staphylococcus epi-dermidis and Cutibacterium acnes grew in all the intraoperative cultures. The patient was subsequently treated with Rifampicin and Moxifloxacin and after 3 months no signs of infection were observed. CT scan showed solid fusion of the at the index segments 7 months postoperatively.

Conclusion: Infections after intradiscal injections are rare and we believe this is the first case describing iatrogenic spondylodiscitis after DiscoGel injection. When increased axial neck pain is experienced after injection with DiscoGel, post-operative spondylodiscitis should be suspected. Even if laboratory parameters are normal, examinations with MRI and CT should be performed and if these studies show signs of infection, surgical revision should be conducted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Occult infection, ACDF, Discitis, Spondylodiscitis
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-96203 (URN)10.1016/j.inat.2021.101453 (DOI)000734875800011 ()2-s2.0-85121228444 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-07 Created: 2022-01-07 Last updated: 2022-01-07Bibliographically approved
Sigmundsson, F. G., Joelson, A. & Strömqvist, F. (2022). Patients with no preoperative back pain have the best outcome after lumbar disc herniation surgery. European spine journal, 31(2), 408-413
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with no preoperative back pain have the best outcome after lumbar disc herniation surgery
2022 (English)In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 408-413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Most patients with lumbar disc herniations requiring surgery have concomitant back pain. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the outcome of surgery for lumbar disc herniations in patients with no preoperative back pain (NBP) compared to those reporting low back pain (LBP).

METHODS: 15,418 patients surgically treated due to LDH with primary discectomy from 1998 until 2020 were included in the study. Self-reported low back pain assessed with a numerical rating scale (NRS) was used to dichotomize the patients in two groups, patients without preoperative back pain (NBP, NRS = 0, n = 1333, 9%) and patients with preoperative low back pain (LBP, NRS > 0, n = 14,085, 91%). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) collected preoperatively and one-year postoperatively were used to evaluate differences in outcomes between the groups.

RESULTS: At the one-year follow-up, 89% of the patients in the NBP group were completely pain free or much better compared with 76% in the LBP group. Significant improvement regarding leg pain was seen in all measured PROMs in both groups oneyear after surgery. In the NBP group, 13% reported clinically significant back pain (NRS difference greater than Minimally Clinical Important Difference (MICD)) at the one-year follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients without preoperative back pain are good candidates for LDH surgery. 13% of patients without preoperative back pain develop clinically significant back pain one-year after surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Back pain, Discectomy, Leg pain, Lumbar disc herniation, Outcome
National Category
Orthopaedics Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-95269 (URN)10.1007/s00586-021-07033-6 (DOI)000711346800001 ()34704128 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118144693 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

Örebro University

Available from: 2021-10-28 Created: 2021-10-28 Last updated: 2022-03-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7376-4664

Search in DiVA

Show all publications