oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Nitrogen dynamics of decomposing Scots pine needle litter depends on colonizing fungal species
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4384-5014
CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie de l'ENS, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France; Umeå University, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå, Sweden.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 95, no 6, article id fiz059Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In boreal ecosystems plant production is often limited by low availability of nitrogen. Nitrogen retention in below-ground organic pools plays an important role in restricting recirculation to plants and thereby hampers forest production. Saprotrophic fungi are commonly assigned to different decomposer strategies, but how these relate to nitrogen cycling remains to be understood. Decomposition of Scots pine needle litter was studied in axenic microcosms with the ligninolytic litter decomposing basidiomycete Gymnopus androsaceus or the stress tolerant ascomycete Chalara longipes. Changes in chemical composition were followed by 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy and nitrogen dynamics was assessed by the addition of a 15N tracer. Decomposition by C. longipes resulted in nitrogen retention in non-hydrolysable organic matter, enriched in aromatic and alkylic compounds, whereas the ligninolytic G. androsaceus was able to access this pool, counteracting nitrogen retention. Our observations suggest that differences in decomposing strategies between fungal species play an important role in regulating nitrogen retention and release during litter decomposition, implying that fungal community composition may impact nitrogen cycling at the ecosystem level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019. Vol. 95, no 6, article id fiz059
Keywords [en]
13C CP/MAS NMR, 15N tracer, functional guilds, litter decomposition, nitrogen cycling, saprotrophic fungi
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74566DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fiz059ISI: 000474762800003PubMedID: 31069387Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85065782720OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-74566DiVA, id: diva2:1320401
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1747Available from: 2019-06-04 Created: 2019-06-04 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Ekblad, Alf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ekblad, Alf
By organisation
School of Science and Technology
In the same journal
FEMS Microbiology Ecology
EcologyMicrobiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 33 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf