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Does beta-blockade reduce the risk of depression in patients with isolated severe extracranial injuries?
Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Division of Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.
Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Division of Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.
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2017 (Engelska)Ingår i: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 41, nr 7, s. 1801-1806Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Approximately half of trauma patients develop post-traumatic depression. It is suggested that beta-blockade impairs trauma memory recollection, reducing depressive symptoms. This study investigates the effect of early beta-blockade on depression following severe traumatic injuries in patients without significant brain injury.

METHODS: Patients were identified by retrospectively reviewing the trauma registry at an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Severe extracranial injuries were defined as extracranial injuries with Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3, intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score <3 and an Injury Severity Score ≥16. In-hospital deaths and patients prescribed antidepressant therapy ≤1 year prior to admission were excluded. Patients were stratified into groups based on pre-admission beta-blocker status. The primary outcome was post-traumatic depression, defined as receiving antidepressants ≤1 year following trauma.

RESULTS: Five hundred and ninety-six patients met the inclusion criteria with 11.4% prescribed pre-admission beta-blockade. Patients receiving beta-blockers were significantly older (57 ± 18 vs. 42 ± 17 years, p < 0.001) with lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (12 ± 3 vs. 14 ± 2, p < 0.001). The beta-blocked cohort spent significantly longer in hospital (21 ± 20 vs. 15 ± 17 days, p < 0.01) and intensive care (4 ± 7 vs. 3 ± 5 days, p = 0.01). A forward logistic regression model was applied and predicted lack of beta-blockade to be associated with increased risk of depression (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-7.2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for group differences, patients lacking beta-blockers demonstrated an increased risk of depression (AOR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6, p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS: Pre-admission beta-blockade is associated with a significantly reduced risk of depression following severe traumatic injury. Further investigation is needed to determine the beneficial effects of beta-blockade in these instances.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
New York: Springer, 2017. Vol. 41, nr 7, s. 1801-1806
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57385DOI: 10.1007/s00268-017-3935-5ISI: 000403056400020PubMedID: 28265730Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85014574094OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-57385DiVA, id: diva2:1093657
Tillgänglig från: 2017-05-08 Skapad: 2017-05-08 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-05-13Bibliografiskt granskad
Ingår i avhandling
1. The Association Between Beta-Blockade and Clinical Outcomes in the Context of Surgical and Traumatic Stress
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>The Association Between Beta-Blockade and Clinical Outcomes in the Context of Surgical and Traumatic Stress
2019 (Engelska)Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

Traumatic injury and major abdominal surgery are areas in general surgery associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The overall colorectal cancer surgery mortality rate is around 4%, with that for emergency surgery more than twice as high as for planned. Surgical morbidity varies between 25% and 45%. Around half of trauma patients develop low mood. In one quarter of patients this becomes permanent. Depression is known to impede physical rehabilitation and recovery. The onset of physiological stress, driven by adrenergic hyperactivity following traumatic and surgical injury is hypothesized to contribute to these adverse outcomes. Interest has therefore been sparked into blocking adrenergic receptor activation.

Papers I and II investigated the role of beta-blocker therapy in preventing post-traumatic depression following severe traumatic brain injury (Paper I) and severe extracranial injury (Paper II). The Karolinska University Hospital Trauma Registry was used to identify patients admitted between 2007 and 2011. In Paper I (n = 545), patients on pre-injury beta-blocker therapy were matched to beta-blocker naïve patients with equivalent injury burden. Results revealed that beta-blocked patients exhibited a 60% reduced risk of needing antidepressant therapy within one year of trauma. In Paper II (n = 596), the lack of beta-blocker use before extracranial trauma was linked to a three-fold increase in the risk of antidepressant initiation.

Papers III-V explored the role of pre-operative beta-blocker therapy in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer between 2007 and 2016, identified using the nationwide Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Paper III (n = 3,187) identified a 69% reduction in the risk of 30-day mortality in beta-blocked patients. Paper IV (n = 22,337) outlined long-term survival benefits for patients on beta-blocker therapy prior to undergoing elective surgery for colon cancer. Beta-blocked patients showed a risk reduction of 42% for 1-year all-cause mortality and 18% for 5-year cancerspecific mortality. Similarly, patients on beta-blocker therapy who underwent surgery for rectal cancer demonstrated improved survival up to one year after surgery with a risk reduction of 57% and a reduction in anastomotic failure and infectious complications in Paper V (n = 11,966).

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Örebro: Örebro University, 2019. s. 96
Serie
Örebro Studies in Medicine, ISSN 1652-4063 ; 194
Nyckelord
Beta-blocker therapy, adrenergic hyperactivity, physiological stress, trauma, depression, colorectal cancer, complications, mortality
Nationell ämneskategori
Kirurgi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73256 (URN)978-91-7529-277-9 (ISBN)
Disputation
2019-06-05, Örebro universitet, Campus USÖ, hörsal C2, Södra Grev Rosengatan 32, Örebro, 10:00 (Engelska)
Opponent
Handledare
Tillgänglig från: 2019-03-21 Skapad: 2019-03-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-08-07Bibliografiskt granskad

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