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Physical inactivity and platelet function in humans and brown bears: A comparative study
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Acute Internal Medicine, Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad, Sweden.
CNRS UMR 7178, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim, Norway.
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2018 (English)In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 87-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical inactivity increases the risk of thromboembolism. However, good standardized human models on inactivity are in short supply and experimental models are few.

Our objective was to investigate how standardized bed rest affects platelet aggregation in humans and to investigate if aggregation is altered in a translational model system - the hibernating brown bear (Ursus arctos). We collected blood from (1) healthy male volunteers participating in a 21-day bed rest study in head-down tilt position (-6°) 24 h a day; (2) free-ranging brown bears captured during winter hibernation and again during active state in summer. We analyzed platelet function using multiple electrode platelet aggregometry. In total, 9 healthy male volunteers (age 31.0 ± 6.4 years) and 13 brown bears (7 females and 6 males, age 2.8 ± 0.6 years) were included. In hibernating bears adenosine diphosphate, arachidonic acid, thrombin receptor activating peptide, and collagen impedance aggregometry tests were all halved compared to summer active state. In human volunteers no statistically significant changes were found between baseline and the end of bed rest. In human male volunteers 3 weeks of bed rest did not affect platelet function. In hibernating brown bears platelet aggregation was halved compared to summer and we hypothesize that this is a protective measure to avoid formation of thrombi under periods of low blood flow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 29, no 1, p. 87-90
Keywords [en]
Thrombosis; Platelets; Platelet aggregation; Immobilization
National Category
Physiology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Hematology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61740DOI: 10.1080/09537104.2017.1336530ISI: 000423584700015PubMedID: 28758823Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85026519068OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-61740DiVA, id: diva2:1153930
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Immobilization as a risk factor for arterial and venous thrombosis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immobilization as a risk factor for arterial and venous thrombosis
2018 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: Immobilization and a sedentary lifestyle are correlated with an elevated risk of both arterial and venous thrombosis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether markers associated with cardiovascular disease risk are altered during long term immobilization in a human model and in the brown bear, which survives annual cycles of long-term immobilization.

Methods: In study populations assigned to 20-60 days of strict head-down-tilt bed rest 24h a day, we analysed blood levels of the emerging cardiovascular disease marker cystatin C, soluble markers of in vivo platelet activation P-selectin and PDGF-BB, and platelet aggregation. Blood samples were taken from free-ranging brown bears in summer and again during hibernation for analysis of lipid profile and platelet aggregation. Histological examination was performed on the left anterior descending coronary artery and aortic arches of bears harvested during the hunting season.

Results: During prolonged bed rest in humans, levels of cystatin C and platelet aggregation remained unchanged, but we observed a significant decrease in platelet activation markers. Brown bear plasma lipids were elevated during hibernation compared with the active state and cholesterol levels were generally considerably higher than normal human values. The arterial specimens showed no signs of atherosclerosis. Platelet aggregation was halved during hibernation compared to the active state.

Conclusions: Long-term immobilization has effects on several cardiovascular risk factors in both humans and bears. Increased knowledge and understanding of the protective mechanisms that allows the brown bear to survive repeated periods of immobilization could contribute to new strategies for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2018. p. 69
Series
Örebro Studies in Medicine, ISSN 1652-4063 ; 179
Keywords
Venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, atherosclerosis, cystatin C, cholesterol, platelet activation, platelet aggregation, immobilization
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65003 (URN)978-91-7529-243-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-06-07, Örebro universitet, Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Södra Grev Rosengatan 32, Örebro, 09:15 (Swedish)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved

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Arinell, KarinFröbert, Ole

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