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Implicated food products for listeriosis and changes in serovars of Listeria monocytogenes affecting humans in recent decades
School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Meal Science, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0154-9452
Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6903-5322
2018 (English)In: Foodborne pathogens and disease, ISSN 1535-3141, E-ISSN 1556-7125, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 387-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Listeriosis is a foodborne disease with a high fatality rate, and infection is mostly transmitted through ready-toeat(RTE) foods contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, such as gravad/smoked fish, soft cheeses, andsliced processed delicatessen (deli) meat. Food products/dishes stored in vacuum or in modified atmospheresand with extended refrigerator shelf lives provide an opportunity for L. monocytogenes to multiply to largenumbers toward the end of the shelf life. Elderly, pregnant women, neonates, and immunocompromisedindividuals are particularly susceptible to L. monocytogenes. Listeriosis in humans manifests primarily assepticemia, meningitis, encephalitis, gastrointestinal infection, and abortion. In the mid 1990s and early 2000s ashift from L. monocytogenes serovar 4b to serovar 1/2a causing human listeriosis occurred, and serovar 1/2a isbecoming more frequently linked to outbreaks of listeriosis, particularly in Europe and Northern America.Consumer lifestyle has changed, and less time is available for food preparation. Modern lifestyle has markedlychanged eating habits worldwide, with a consequent increased demand for RTE foods; therefore, more RTE andtake away foods are consumed. There is a concern that many Listeria outbreaks are reported from hospitals.Therefore, it is vitally important that foods (especially cooked and chilled) delivered to hospitals and residentialhomes for senior citizens and elderly people are reheated to at least 72C: cold food, such as turkey deli meatand cold-smoked and gravad salmon should be free from L. monocytogenes. Several countries have zerotolerance for RTE foods that support the growth of Listeria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2018. Vol. 15, no 7, p. 387-397
Keywords [en]
serovar, RTE foods, hospital, listeriosis
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67759DOI: 10.1089/fpd.2017.2419ISI: 000437227500001PubMedID: 29958028OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-67759DiVA, id: diva2:1231563
Available from: 2018-07-07 Created: 2018-07-07 Last updated: 2018-07-23Bibliographically approved

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Danielsson Tham, Marie-LouiseTham, Wilhelm

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