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After Universal Grammar: The Ecological Turn in Linguistics
2012 (English)In: Logos & Episteme: an International Journal of Epistemology, ISSN 2069-0533, E-ISSN 2069-3052, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 469-487Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Of all the human sciences, linguistics has had perhaps the most success in pivoting itself towards the physical sciences, particularly in the past fifty years with the dominance of Universal Grammar, which is most closely associated with the work of Noam Chomsky. One of the most important implications of Universal Grammar has been that language production in its most natural and optimal state is organized analytically, and thus shares the same organizational logic of other knowledge systems in Western science, such as the binomial taxonomization of nature and analytic geometry. This essay argues that recent challenges to Universal Grammar represent more than just a theoretical dispute within a single discipline; they threaten to undermine the hegemony of analytical knowledge systems in general. While analytical logic has served Western science well, analogical knowledge systems may be able to address problems that analytical logic cannot, such as ecological crises, the limitations of artificial intelligence, and the problems of complex systems. Instead of studying languages as a means of modeling human thought in general, languages should also be studied and preserved as heteronomous knowledge systems which themselves exist as embodied objects within particular ecologies. Rethinking language as existing on a univocal plane with other ecological objects will provide us with new insight on the ethics and epistemology of analogical knowledge production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bucharest, Romania: Institutul European din Romania / European Institute of Romania , 2012. Vol. 3, no 3, p. 469-487
Keywords [en]
Universal Grammar, linguistics, Noam Chomsky, Daniel Everett, ecology, artificial intelligence, taxonomy
National Category
Languages and Literature Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Research subject
History Of Sciences and Ideas; Linguistics; Rhetoric
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70035DOI: 10.5840/logos-episteme20123327OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-70035DiVA, id: diva2:1261239
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://logos-and-episteme.acadiasi.ro/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/AFTER-UNIVERSAL-GRAMMAR.pdf

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Roderick, Noah

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4445464748495047 of 130
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  • apa
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Output format
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