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Patterns in the social representation of "hearing loss" across countries: how do demographic factors influence this representation?
The Department of Social Work, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore, India; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India.
LERASS Laboratory, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
Department of History and Philosophy of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 925-932Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to understand patterns in the social representation of hearing loss reported by adults across different countries and explore the impact of different demographic factors on response patterns. The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected using a free association task and analysed using qualitative content analysis, cluster analysis and chi-square analysis. The study sample included 404 adults (18 years and over) in the general population from four countries (India, Iran, Portugal and UK). The cluster analysis included 380 responses out of 404 (94.06%) and resulted in five clusters. The clusters were named: (1) individual aspects; (2) aetiology; (3) the surrounding society; (4) limitations and (5) exposed. Various demographic factors (age, occupation type, education and country) showed an association with different clusters, although country of origin seemed to be associated with most clusters. The study results suggest that how hearing loss is represented in adults in general population varies and is mainly related to country of origin. These findings strengthen the argument about cross-cultural differences in perception of hearing loss, which calls for a need to make necessary accommodations while developing public health strategies about hearing loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018. Vol. 57, no 12, p. 925-932
Keywords [en]
Hearing loss, attitude, cross-culture, social representation
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70410DOI: 10.1080/14992027.2018.1516894ISI: 000451230300007PubMedID: 30468404Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85057085145OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-70410DiVA, id: diva2:1267557
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Danermark, Berth

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