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Metal contaminated soil leachates from an art glass factory elicit stress response, alter fatty acid metabolism and reduce lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. The Life Science Centre - Biology.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7845-6495
Detectum AB, Jönköping, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9960-0070
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 651, p. 2218-2227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study evaluated the toxicity of metal contamination in soils from an art glass factory in Smaland Sweden using a Caenorhabditis elegans nematode model. The aim of the study was to chemically analyze the soil samples and study the biological effects of water-soluble leachates on the nematodes using different physiological endpoints. The total metal content showed that As, Cd and Pb were at levels above the guideline values for soils in areas around the factory. Less than 10% of the total metal content in the soil was found in the water-soluble leachates, however, Al, As, Fe and Pb remained higher than the guideline values for safe drinking water. Exposure of C. elegans to the water-soluble leachates, at both post-hatching larvae stage (L1-young adult) for 48 h and at the young adult stage (L4) for 6 h, showed significant gene alteration. Although the nematodes did not exhibit acute lethality, lifespan was significantly reduced upon exposure. C. elegans also showed altered gene expression associated with stress response and fat metabolism, as well as enhanced accumulation of body fat. The study highlighted the significance of assessing environmental samples using a combination of gene expression analysis, fatty acid metabolism and lifespan for providing valuable insight into the negative impact of metals. The altered fat metabolism and reduced lifespan on exposure to soil leachates motivates further studies to explore the mechanism of the toxicity associated with the metals present in the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 651, p. 2218-2227
Keywords [en]
Contaminated soil, Water-soluble leachates, Ecotoxicology, Lipid metabolism, Heavy metals, Glass manufacturing
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70482DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.067ISI: 000450551600055PubMedID: 30326454Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054622934OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-70482DiVA, id: diva2:1268371
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150084Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Rai, NehaSjöberg, ViktorKarlsson, StefanOlsson, Per-ErikJass, Jana

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