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A break from pain!: Interruption management in the context of pain
Research Group Experimental Health Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands; Research Group Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Belgium.
Department of Experimental-Clinical & Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Research Group Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Belgium.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9462-0256
Research Group Experimental Health Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands; Research Group Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Belgium.
2019 (English)In: Pain management, ISSN 1758-1869, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 81-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Activity interruptions, namely temporary suspensions of an ongoing task with the intention to resume it later, are common in pain. First, pain is a threat signal that urges us to interrupt ongoing activities in order to manage the pain and its cause. Second, activity interruptions are used in chronic pain management. However, activity interruptions by pain may carry costs for activity performance. These costs have recently started to be systematically investigated. We review the evidence on the consequences of activity interruptions by pain for the performance of the interrupted activity. Further, inspired by literature on interruptions from other research fields, we suggest ways to improve interruption management in the field of pain, and provide a future research agenda.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Future Medicine Ltd. , 2019. Vol. 9, no 1, p. 81-91
Keywords [en]
Activity pacing, chronic pain, interruption management
National Category
Medical Ergonomics Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70621DOI: 10.2217/pmt-2018-0038ISI: 000453935500010PubMedID: 30516435OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-70621DiVA, id: diva2:1269366
Note

Funding Agencies:

Research Foundation - Flanders (Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek [FWO] Vlaanderen), Belgium  11N8215N 

Flemish Government, Belgium  METH/15/011 

Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Schrooten, Martien G. S.

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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