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Enabling activity in palliative care: focus groups among occupational therapists
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Municipality, Healthcare and Social Services, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1781-2729
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4247-2236
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9209-5179
2019 (English)In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Activity participation may support clients in palliative care to maintain dignity and quality of life. Literature and policy documents state that occupational therapists should be part of the team in palliative care, but give limited guidance on how interventions should be employed. Thus, the aim was to describe occupational therapists’ experiences of enabling activity for seriously ill and dying clients.

Methods: In a descriptive, qualitative study, three focus groups with occupational therapists (n = 14) were conducted. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: The findings showed that occupational therapists were enabling activity in clients in palliative care whilst considering the client’s individual preferences. Motivation was seen to facilitate activity, while environmental restrictions act as barriers. The occupational therapists wanted to bring activities physically closer to the clients and felt a need for more client contact to enable activity.

Conclusions: Occupational therapists’ interventions in palliative care includes prioritizing and planning activities according to clients’ preferences and capacities. The individual nature of these activities makes it impossible to create standardised protocol for interventions, but the study results can be used to describe occupational therapists’ strategies and to guide their work, especially unexperienced occupational therapists in palliative care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019. Vol. 18, no 1, article id 17
Keywords [en]
Activities of daily living, leisure activities, client participation, quality of life, qualitative research
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71694DOI: 10.1186/s12904-019-0394-9ISI: 000458150200001PubMedID: 30732615Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85061266778OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-71694DiVA, id: diva2:1281733
Note

Funding Agency:

University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden

Available from: 2019-01-23 Created: 2019-01-23 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Hermansson, LiselotteBlomberg, Karin

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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