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UV-A radiation effects on higher plants: Exploring the known unknown
Environmental Sciences Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Girona, Campus de Montilivi, Girona, Spain.
School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
Environmental Sciences Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Girona, Campus de Montilivi, Girona, Spain.
Division of Plant Biology, Department of Biosciences, Viikki Plant Science Center, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. (Molecular Biochemistry)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9233-7254
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2017 (English)In: Plant Science, ISSN 0168-9452, E-ISSN 1873-2259, Vol. 255, p. 72-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ultraviolet-A radiation (UV-A: 315–400 nm) is a component of solar radiation that exerts a wide range of physiological responses in plants. Currently, field attenuation experiments are the most reliable source of information on the effects of UV-A. Common plant responses to UV-A include both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on biomass accumulation and morphology. UV-A effects on biomass accumulation can differ from those on root: shoot ratio, and distinct responses are described for different leaf tissues. Inhibitory and enhancing effects of UV-A on photosynthesis are also analysed, as well as activation of photoprotective responses, including UV-absorbing pigments. UV-A-induced leaf flavonoids are highly compound-specific and species-dependent. Many of the effects on growth and development exerted by UV-A are distinct to those triggered by UV-B and vary considerably in terms of the direction the response takes. Such differences may reflect diverse UV-perception mechanisms with multiple photoreceptors operating in the UV-A range and/or variations in the experimental approaches used. This review highlights a role that various photoreceptors (UVR8, phototropins, phytochromes and cryptochromes) may play in plant responses to UV-A when dose, wavelength and other conditions are taken into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 255, p. 72-81
Keywords [en]
Ultraviolet-A, Plant biomass, Morphology, Photosynthesis, Photodamage, Phenolics
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72400DOI: 10.1016/j.plantsci.2016.11.014ISI: 000394194800008PubMedID: 28131343Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85003976956OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-72400DiVA, id: diva2:1288040
Funder
Academy of Finland
Note

Funding agencies:

Spanish Government, CGL2010-2283

University of Girona, MPCUdG2016

Foundation Ireland, 11/RFP.1/EOB/3303

COST Action FA0906, UV4Growth

Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved

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Morales, Luis Orlando

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