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So What Has Been, Is, and Might Be Going on in Studying Men and Masculinities?: Some Continuities and Discontinuities
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, England; University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9808-1413
2019 (English)In: Men and Masculinities, ISSN 1097-184X, E-ISSN 1552-6828, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Following introductory remarks on how the terms "masculinities" and "men" have been used differentially in recent critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM), the article reviews some key aspects of CSMM - past, present and future. The diverse influences on CSMM have included various feminisms, gay studies, anti-imperialism, civil rights, anti-racism, green and environmental movements, as well as LGBTIQ+ movements, Critical Race Studies, Globalization/Transnational Studies, and Intersectionality Studies. In the present period, the range of theoretical and political approaches and influences on studies continues to grow, with, for example, queer, post-, post post-, new materialist, posthumanist, and science and technology studies, making for some discontinuities with established masculinities theory. In many regions, there are now more women working explicitly and long-term in the area, even if that is itself not new. CSMM have also become more geographically widespread, more dispersed, more comparative, international, transnational, postcolonial, decolonializing, globally "Southern", global, globalized and globalizing; this diversifying feature is transforming CSMM. Key areas for future research are identified, including the relations of men and masculinities to: first, ecology, environment and climate change; second, ICTs, social media, AI, robotics and big data; third, transnational/global, transnational institutions and processes; and, fourth, nationalism, racism, authoritarianism, neo-fascism and political masculinism. Together, these make for a "lurking doom". At the same time, there is a whole range of wider theoretical, methodological, epistemological and ontological questions to be taken up in CSMM much more fully in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019. Vol. 22, no 1, p. 53-63
Keywords [en]
men, masculinities, critical studies on men and masculinities, academic histories
National Category
Sociology Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73396DOI: 10.1177/1097184X18805550ISI: 000461223500006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85062975196OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-73396DiVA, id: diva2:1300685
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved

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