To Örebro University

oru.seÖrebro University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Using naso- and oro-intestinal catheters in physiological research for intestinal delivery and sampling in vivo: practical and technical aspects to be considered
Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
Division Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Laboratory of Pediatrics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
Division Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Show others and affiliations
2021 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 843-861Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intestinal catheters have been used for decades in human nutrition, physiology, pharmacokinetics, and gut microbiome research, facilitating the delivery of compounds directly into the intestinal lumen or the aspiration of intestinal fluids in human subjects. Such research provides insights about (local) dynamic metabolic and other intestinal luminal processes, but working with catheters might pose challenges to biomedical researchers and clinicians. Here, we provide an overview of practical and technical aspects of applying naso- and oro-intestinal catheters for delivery of compounds and sampling luminal fluids from the jejunum, ileum, and colon in vivo. The recent literature was extensively reviewed, and combined with experiences and insights we gained through our own clinical trials. We included 60 studies that involved a total of 720 healthy subjects and 42 patients. Most of the studies investigated multiple intestinal regions (24 studies), followed by studies investigating only the jejunum (21 studies), ileum (13 studies), or colon (2 studies). The ileum and colon used to be relatively inaccessible regions in vivo. Custom-made state-of-the-art catheters are available with numerous options for the design, such as multiple lumina, side holes, and inflatable balloons for catheter progression or isolation of intestinal segments. These allow for multiple controlled sampling and compound delivery options in different intestinal regions. Intestinal catheters were often used for delivery (23 studies), sampling (10 studies), or both (27 studies). Sampling speed decreased with increasing distance from the sampling syringe to the specific intestinal segment (i.e., speed highest in duodenum, lowest in ileum/colon). No serious adverse events were reported in the literature, and a dropout rate of around 10% was found for these types of studies. This review is highly relevant for researchers who are active in various research areas and want to expand their research with the use of intestinal catheters in humans in vivo.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2021. Vol. 114, no 3, p. 843-861
Keywords [en]
Aspiration, colon, delivery, human, ileum, intestinal catheter, small intestine, trials
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-91945DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/nqab149ISI: 000704624600008PubMedID: 34036315Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85116958355OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-91945DiVA, id: diva2:1557728
Note

Funding agencies:

Public-private partnership "CarboKinetics"

Agrifirm Innovation Center B.V.

Nutrition Sciences N.V.

Cooperatie Avebe U.A.

DSM Food Specialties B.V.

VanDrie Holding N.V.

Sensus B.V.

 

Available from: 2021-05-27 Created: 2021-05-27 Last updated: 2023-05-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Brummer, Robert Jan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Brummer, Robert Jan
By organisation
School of Medical Sciences
In the same journal
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Pharmaceutical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 19 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf